Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age

  1. Luz Maria De-Regil1,*,
  2. Maria Elena D Jefferds2,
  3. Allison C Sylvetsky3,
  4. Therese Dowswell4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 23 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009085.pub2

How to Cite

De-Regil LM, Jefferds MED, Sylvetsky AC, Dowswell T. Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009085. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009085.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Micronutrient Initiative, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, International Micronutrient Malnutrition Prevention and Control Program, Nutrition Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  3. 3

    Emory University, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  4. 4

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

*Luz Maria De-Regil, Micronutrient Initiative, 180 Elgin Street, Suite 1000, Ottawa, ON, K2P 2K3, Canada. lderegil@micronutrient.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

Background

Approximately 600 million children of preschool and school age are anaemic worldwide. It is estimated that half of the cases are due to iron deficiency. Consequences of iron deficiency anaemia during childhood include growth retardation, reduced school achievement, impaired motor and cognitive development, and increased morbidity and mortality. The provision of daily iron supplements is a widely used strategy for improving iron status in children but its effectiveness has been limited due to its side effects, which can include nausea, constipation or staining of the teeth. As a consequence, intermittent iron supplementation (one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) has been proposed as an effective and safer alternative to daily supplementation.

Objectives

To assess the effects of intermittent iron supplementation, alone or in combination with other vitamins and minerals, on nutritional and developmental outcomes in children from birth to 12 years of age compared with a placebo, no intervention or daily supplementation.

Search methods

We searched the following databases on 24 May 2011: CENTRAL (2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1948 to May week 2, 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 20), CINAHL (1937 to current), POPLINE (all available years) and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). On 29 June 2011 we searched all available years in the following databases: SCIELO, LILACS, IBECS and IMBIOMED. We also contacted relevant organisations (on 3 July 2011) to identify ongoing and unpublished studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised trials with either individual or cluster randomisation. Participants were children under the age of 12 years at the time of intervention with no specific health problems. The intervention assessed was intermittent iron supplementation compared with a placebo, no intervention or daily supplementation.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies against the inclusion criteria, extracted data from included studies and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.

Main results

We included 33 trials, involving 13,114 children (˜49% females) from 20 countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia. The methodological quality of the trials was mixed.

Nineteen trials evaluated intermittent iron supplementation versus no intervention or a placebo and 21 studies evaluated intermittent versus daily iron supplementation. Some of these trials contributed data to both comparisons. Iron alone was provided in most of the trials.

Fifteen studies included children younger than 60 months; 11 trials included children 60 months and older, and seven studies included children in both age categories. One trial included exclusively females. Seven trials included only anaemic children; three studies assessed only non-anaemic children, and in the rest the baseline prevalence of anaemia ranged from 15% to 90%.

In comparison with receiving no intervention or a placebo, children receiving iron supplements intermittently have a lower risk of anaemia (average risk ratio (RR) 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.72, ten studies) and iron deficiency (RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.91, three studies) and have higher haemoglobin (mean difference (MD) 5.20 g/L, 95% CI 2.51 to 7.88, 19 studies) and ferritin concentrations (MD 14.17 µg/L, 95% CI 3.53 to 24.81, five studies).

Intermittent supplementation was as effective as daily supplementation in improving haemoglobin (MD –0.60 g/L, 95% CI –1.54 to 0.35, 19 studies) and ferritin concentrations (MD –4.19 µg/L, 95% CI –9.42 to 1.05, 10 studies), but increased the risk of anaemia in comparison with daily iron supplementation (RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.04 to1.47, six studies). Data on adherence were scarce and it tended to be higher among those children receiving intermittent supplementation, although this result was not statistically significant.

We did not identify any differential effect of the type of intermittent supplementation regimen (one, two or three times a week), the total weekly dose of elemental iron, the nutrient composition, whether recipients were male or female or the length of the intervention.

Authors' conclusions

Intermittent iron supplementation is efficacious to improve haemoglobin concentrations and reduce the risk of having anaemia or iron deficiency in children younger than 12 years of age when compared with a placebo or no intervention, but it is less effective than daily supplementation to prevent or control anaemia. Intermittent supplementation may be a viable public health intervention in settings where daily supplementation has failed or has not been implemented. Information on mortality, morbidity, developmental outcomes and side effects, however, is still lacking.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

One, two or three times a week iron supplements for improving health and development among children under 12 years of age

Approximately 600 million preschool and school-age children are anaemic worldwide. It is estimated that half of these cases are due to a lack of iron. Iron deficiency anaemia during childhood may slow down growth, reduce motor and brain development, and increase illness and death. If anaemia is not treated promptly, these problems may persist later in life. Taking supplements containing iron (sometimes combined with folic acid and other vitamins and minerals) on a daily basis has shown to improve children's health but its use has been limited because supplements may produce side effects such as nausea, constipation or staining of the teeth. It has been suggested that giving iron one, two or three times a week (known as 'intermittent' supplementation) may reduce these side effects and be easier to remember, and thus encourage children to continue taking the iron supplements.

We analysed 33 trials involving 13,314 children (49% females) from 20 countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia, to assess the effects of intermittent iron supplementation, alone or in combination with other vitamins and minerals, on nutritional and developmental outcomes in children from birth to 12 years of age compared with a placebo, no intervention.or daily supplementation.

The studies were of mixed quality. Overall, the results of this review show that giving children supplements with iron alone or in combination with other vitamins and minerals one, two or three times a week approximately halves their risk of having anaemia in comparison with receiving no iron supplements or a placebo. Giving children supplements on a intermittent basis was as effective as daily supplementation for improving haemoglobin and ferritin concentrations, although, children receiving iron supplements intermittently were at higher risk of having anaemia.

We aimed to examine the effects of intermittent supplementation on illness, death, and school and physical performance, as well as on other side effects, but there was insufficient information to draw firm conclusions.

In summary, intermittent iron supplementation is efficacious to improve haemoglobin concentrations and reduce the risk of having anaemia or iron deficiency in children younger than 12 years of age when compared with a placebo or no intervention, but it is less effective than daily supplementation to prevent or control anaemia. Intermittent supplementation may be a viable public health intervention in settings where daily supplementation has failed or has not been implemented. Information on mortality, morbidity, developmental outcomes and side effects, however, is still lacking.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age

Contexte

Environ 600 millions d'enfants d'âge préscolaire et scolaire dans le monde sont anémiques. On estime que la moitié des cas sont dus à une carence en fer. Les conséquences de l'anémie ferriprive dans l'enfance comprennent le retard de croissance, la moins bonne réussite scolaire, le développement moteur et cognitif déficient et l'augmentation de la morbidité et la mortalité. La supplémentation quotidienne en fer est une stratégie largement utilisée pour améliorer le statut du fer chez les enfants mais son efficacité a été limitée en raison de ses effets secondaires, tels que nausées, constipation ou taches sur les dents. En conséquence, la supplémentation en fer intermittente (une, deux ou trois fois par semaine, des jours non consécutifs) a été proposée comme alternative efficace et plus sûre à la supplémentation quotidienne.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la supplémentation en fer intermittente, seule ou en combinaison avec d'autres vitamines et minéraux, sur les résultats nutritionnels et développementaux chez les enfants de la naissance à l'âge de 12 ans, comparativement à un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention ou à une supplémentation quotidienne.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons cherché dans les bases de données suivantes le 24 mai 2011 : CENTRAL (2011, numéro 2), MEDLINE (de 1948 à la 2ème semaine de mai 2011), EMBASE (de 1980 à la 20ème semaine de 2011), CINAHL (de 1937 à aujourd'hui), POPLINE (toutes les années disponibles) et le Système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'OMS (ICTRP). Le 29 Juin 2011, nous avons passé au crible toutes les années disponibles dans les bases de données suivantes : SCIELO, LILACS, IBECS et IMBIOMED. Nous avons également contacté des organisations pertinentes (le 3 Juillet 2011) pour identifier des études en cours ou non publiés.

Critères de sélection

Des essais randomisés et quasi-randomisés avec randomisation individuelle ou en grappes. Les participants étaient des enfants âgés de moins de 12 ans au moment de l'intervention, sans problèmes de santé spécifiques. L'intervention évaluée était une supplémentation en fer intermittente comparée à un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention ou à une supplémentation quotidienne.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué de manière indépendante l'éligibilité des études au regard des critères d'inclusion, extrait les données des études incluses et évalué le risque de biais des études incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 33 essais, portant au total sur 13 114 enfants (~ 49 % de filles) de 20 pays d'Amérique latine, d'Afrique et d'Asie. La qualité méthodologique des essais était inégale.

Dix-neuf essais ont évalué la supplémentation intermittente en fer par rapport à l'absence d'intervention ou à un placebo et 21 études ont comparé les supplémentations en fer quotidienne versus intermittente. Certains de ces essais ont fourni des données pour les deux comparaisons. Dans la plupart des essais le fer était administré seul.

Quinze études incluaient des enfants de moins de 60 mois, 11 essais incluaient des enfants de 60 mois et plus, et sept études incluaient des enfants des deux tranches d'âge. Un essai ne comprenait que des filles. Sept essais incluaient seulement des enfants anémiques, trois études n'avaient évalué que des enfants non anémiques, et dans les autres études la prévalence de l'anémie au départ variait de 15 % à 90 %..

En comparaison avec l'absence d'intervention ou avec la réception d'un placebo, les enfants recevant des suppléments de fer par intermittence ont un moindre risque d'anémie (ratio de risque moyen (RR) 0,51 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,37 à 0,72 ; dix études) et de carence en fer (RR 0,24 ; IC à 95 % 0,06 à 0,91 ; trois études) et ont des taux plus élevés d'hémoglobine (différence moyenne (DM) 5,20 g/L ; IC à 95 % 2,51 à 7,88 ; 19 études) et de concentration de ferritine (DM 14,17 mg/L ; IC à 95 % 3,53 à 24,81 ; cinq études).

La supplémentation intermittente s'est montrée aussi efficace que la supplémentation quotidienne dans l'amélioration des concentrations d'hémoglobine (DM -0,60 g/L ; IC à 95 % -1,54 à 0,35 ; 19 études) et de ferritine (DM -4,19 mg/L ; IC à 95 % -9,42 à 1,05 ; 10 études), mais augmentait le risque d'anémie en comparaison avec la supplémentation en fer quotidienne (RR 1,23 ; IC à 95 % 1,04 à 1,47 ; six études). Les données sur l'observance du traitement étaient rares et elle avait tendance à être plus élevée chez les enfants recevant une supplémentation intermittente, bien que ce résultat n'était pas statistiquement significatif.

Nous n'avons pas relevé d'effet différentiel du type de régime de supplémentation intermittente (une, deux ou trois par semaine), de la dose hebdomadaire totale de fer élémentaire, de la composition en éléments nutritifs, du fait que les bénéficiaires étaient des garçons ou des filles, ou de la durée de l'intervention.

Conclusions des auteurs

La supplémentation en fer intermittente est efficace pour améliorer le taux d'hémoglobine et réduire le risque d'anémie ou de carence en fer chez les enfants âgés de moins de 12 ans en comparaison avec un placebo ou avec l'absence d'intervention, mais il est moins efficace que la supplémentation quotidienne pour prévenir ou contrôler l'anémie. La supplémentation intermittente peut être une intervention de santé publique viable dans des contextes où la supplémentation quotidienne a échoué ou n'a pas été mise en œuvre. On manque cependant encore d'informations sur la mortalité, la morbidité, les résultats développementaux et les effets secondaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age

La supplémentation en fer une, deux ou trois fois par semaine pour améliorer la santé et le développement des enfants de moins de 12 ans

Environ 600 millions d'enfants d'âge préscolaire et scolaire dans le monde sont anémiques. On estime que la moitié de ces cas sont dus à une carence en fer. L'anémie ferriprive durant l'enfance peut ralentir la croissance, réduire le développement moteur et cérébral, et augmenter les risques de maladie et de mort. Si l'anémie n'est pas traitée rapidement, ces problèmes peuvent persister plus tard dans la vie. Il a été montré que la prise de suppléments contenant du fer (parfois combiné avec de l'acide folique et d'autres vitamines et minéraux) sur une base quotidienne améliorait la santé des enfants, mais son utilisation a été limitée parce que les suppléments peuvent produire des effets secondaires tels que nausées, constipation ou taches sur les dents. Il a été suggéré que ne donner du fer qu'une, deux ou trois fois par semaine (ce qu'on appelle la supplémentation 'intermittente') pourrait réduire ces effets secondaires et être plus facile à ne pas oublier, et donc encourager les enfants à continuer à prendre les suppléments de fer

Nous avons analysé 33 essais impliquant 13 314 enfants (49 % de filles) de 20 pays d'Amérique latine, d'Afrique et d'Asie, afin d'évaluer les effets de la supplémentation en fer intermittente, seule ou en combinaison avec d'autres vitamines et minéraux, sur les résultats nutritionnels et développementaux chez les enfants de la naissance à l'âge de 12 ans, comparativement à un placebo, à l'absence d'intervention ou à la supplémentation quotidienne.

Les études étaient de qualité inégale. Globalement, les résultats de cette revue montrent que donner aux enfants des suppléments de fer, seul ou en combinaison avec d'autres vitamines et minéraux, une, deux ou trois fois par semaine diminue à peu près de moitié leur risque de souffrir d'anémie, en comparaison avec ne pas recevoir de suppléments de fer ou recevoir un placebo. Donner des suppléments aux enfants sur une base intermittente était aussi efficace que la supplémentation quotidienne pour améliorer le taux d'hémoglobine et de ferritine, mais toutefois les enfants recevant des suppléments de fer par intermittence avaient un risque plus élevé d'anémie.

Nous avons cherché à examiner les effets de la supplémentation intermittente sur la maladie, la mort, les performances physiques et scolaires, ainsi que sur d'autres effets secondaires, mais il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'informations pour tirer des conclusions solides.

En résumé, la supplémentation en fer intermittente est efficace pour améliorer le taux d'hémoglobine et réduire le risque d'anémie ou de carence en fer chez les enfants âgés de moins de 12 ans en comparaison avec un placebo ou avec l'absence d'intervention, mais il est moins efficace que la supplémentation quotidienne pour prévenir ou contrôler l'anémie. La supplémentation intermittente peut être une intervention de santé publique viable dans des contextes où la supplémentation quotidienne a échoué ou n'a pas été mise en œuvre. On manque cependant encore d'informations sur la mortalité, la morbidité, les résultats développementaux et les effets secondaires..

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

摘要

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

間歇性補鐵以改善12歲以下孩童的營養與發展

背景

全世界約有60億的學齡前與學齡兒童貧血。估計有半數的原因是缺鐵。兒童時期缺鐵貧血的後果包含有生長遲緩、降低學業成就、運動與認知發展受損、還有增加的發病率與死亡率。每日鐵質的補充是改善兒童鐵質條件所廣泛使用的策略,但其有效性因為副作用而受限,副作用會造成噁心、便秘或牙齒染色。因此,提出間歇性補鐵一周1、2或3次於非連續天) 做為每日補充更為有效且安全的替代方案。 評估間歇性補鐵與安慰劑、無干介入或是每日補充比較,以單獨或是與其他微生素與礦物質結合方式,對出生到12歲兒童在營養與發展成果的效果。

目標

評估間歇性補鐵與安慰劑、無干介入或是每日補充比較,以單獨或是與其他微生素與礦物質結合方式,對出生到12歲兒童在營養與發展成果的效果。

搜尋策略

我們搜尋了下列數據庫到2011年5月24日為止: CENTRAL (2011年第2期), MEDLINE (1948年到2011年5月第2周)、EMBASE (1980 年到2011年第20周)、 CINAHL (1937年至今)、POPLINE (所有可得年份)以及WHO國際臨床試驗註冊平台(ICTRP)。至2011年6月29日止,我們搜尋了下列資料庫中所有可取得的年份: SCIELO、LILACS、IBECS與IMBIOMED。我們也與相關組織聯絡(於2011年7月3日)以找出進行中與未公開的研究。

選擇標準

隨機與準隨機試驗,不論是個人或群集隨機分派。參與者為12歲以下孩童,介入時無特定健康問題。評估介入為間歇性補鐵與安慰劑、無介入或是每日補充進行比較。

資料收集與分析

兩位作者獨立評估研究對比納入條件之合格性、由所包含研究中萃取資訊並評估所包含研究的偏誤風險。

主要結論

我們納入了33個試驗,涵蓋來自拉丁美洲、非洲與亞洲20個國家的13114名兒童(~49% 女性) 。試驗方法論品質是混合的。

19個試驗評值了間歇性補鐵對比無介入或是安慰劑,而有21個試驗評估間歇性對照每日補充鐵質。這些試驗中有某些在兩個比較中都有貢獻。單獨補鐵在大多數的試驗中提出 。

15個研究中包含60個月以下的孩童; 11個試驗包含60個月與以上的孩童,還有7個研究包含兩個年齡類別的孩童。一個試驗中僅有女性。7個試驗僅包含貧血孩童;3個研究僅評估非貧血孩童,且在其餘中,貧血基線普遍率範圍由15%到 90%。

與接受無介入與安慰劑者比較,接受間歇性補鐵的兒童貧血 (平均風險比 (RR) 0.51, 95% 信賴區間 (CI) 0.37到 0.72,10個研究)與缺鐵風險較低(RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.06到0.91,3個研究),並有較高的血紅素 (平均數差異(MD) 5.20 g/L, 95% CI 2.51 到 7.88,19個研究) 與鐵蛋白濃度(MD 14.17 µg/L, 95% CI 3.53 到24.81,5個研究)。

間歇性補鐵在改善血紅素 (MD –0.60 g/L, 95% CI –1.54到0.35,19個研究)與鐵蛋白濃度(MD –4.19 µg/L, 95% CI –9.42 到1.05,10個研究)上與每日補充一樣有效,但與每日補鐵相比增加了貧血的風險(RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.04到1.47,6個研究)。 缺少一致性相關數據,且其傾向於在接受間歇性補充的孩童身上風險較高,雖然此結果不具統計上的顯著性。

我們沒有找出任何間歇性補鐵治療方法(一周1、2或3次)、一週總計的鐵素劑量、營養成分類型的差異效果,不論接受者為男性或女性,又或是介入長度。

作者結論

與安慰劑或無介入相比,間歇性補鐵在改善血紅素濃度與降低貧血風險或是12歲以下兒童缺鐵上有效,但較每日補充在避免或控致貧血上效果差 。於每日補充失敗或是未曾執行處,週期性補充或許是可行的大眾健康介入。然而,死亡率、發病率、發展性成果與副作用相關資訊仍然缺乏。

 

一般語言總結

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要
  7. 一般語言總結

間歇性補鐵以改善12歲以下孩童的營養與發展

一週1、2或3次補鐵以改善12歲以下孩童的健康與發展

全世界約有60億學齡前與學齡兒童有貧血問題。估計此情形半數是因為缺鐵。兒童時期缺鐵貧血會延緩生長、降低運動與腦部發展、並增加疾病與死亡。若未適當治療貧血,這些問題會持續到往後的人生。以每日基礎服用含鐵的補充 (有時與葉酸與及其他微生素與礦物質結合)顯示出能改善兒童健康,但它的使用因為可能產生噁心、便秘或牙齒染色這樣的副作用而受限制 。建議一週補鐵1、2或3次(稱為"間歇性"補充)可能可以降低這些副作用並易於記得,因此可鼓勵孩童繼續服用鐵質補充。

我們分析了33個試驗,涵蓋來自拉丁美洲、非洲與亞洲20個國家的13314名兒童(49%女性),與安慰劑、無介入或每日補充相比,想要評估間歇性補鐵、單獨或是與其他微生素與礦物質結合在12歲以下兒童營養與發展上的效果。

研究品質是混合。整體而言,此文獻回顧的研究結果顯示與無治療與安慰劑相比,單獨提供兒童鐵質補充或是與其他為生素與礦物質結合,一週1、2或3次,大約可減半他們產生貧血的風險。雖然接受間歇性補充的兒童貧血風險較高,但以間歇基礎提供兒童補充在改善血紅素與鐵蛋白濃度上與每日補充一樣有效。

我們的目標在於檢驗間歇性補血在疾病、死亡、以及學校與身體表現、還有其他副作用上的影響,但沒有充分的證據可得出確切的結論。

總之,與安慰劑或無介入比較,間歇性補鐵在改善血紅素濃度與降低12歲以下孩童貧血風險或缺鐵情形上有效,但較每日補充在預防或控制貧血的效果差。於每日補充失敗或是未曾執行處,間歇性補充或許是可行的大眾健康介入。然而,死亡率、發病率、發展性成果與副作用相關資訊仍然缺乏。

譯註

East Asian Cochrane Alliance 5th March, 2014 翻譯
翻譯由 台灣衛生福利部/台北醫學大學實證醫學研究中心 資助