Intervention Review

The impact of user fees on access to health services in low- and middle-income countries

  1. Mylene Lagarde*,
  2. Natasha Palmer

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 13 APR 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009094

How to Cite

Lagarde M, Palmer N. The impact of user fees on access to health services in low- and middle-income countries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD009094. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009094.

Author Information

  1. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Department of Global Health and Development, London, UK

*Mylene Lagarde, Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Mylene.Lagarde@lshtm.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 13 APR 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Following an international push for financing reforms, many low- and middle-income countries introduced user fees to raise additional revenue for health systems. User fees are charges levied at the point of use and are supposed to help reduce ‘frivolous’ consumption of health services, increase quality of services available and, as a result, increase utilisation of services.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of introducing, removing or changing user fees to improve access to care in low-and middle-income countries

Search methods

We searched 25 international databases, including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group’s Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We also searched the websites and online resources of international agencies, organisations and universities to find relevant grey literature. We conducted the original searches between November 2005 and April 2006 and the updated search in CENTRAL (DVD-ROM 2011, Issue 1); MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid (January 25, 2011); MEDLINE, Ovid (1948 to January Week 2 2011); EMBASE, Ovid (1980 to 2011 Week 03) and EconLit, CSA Illumina (1969 - present) on the 26th of January 2011.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials, interrupted time-series studies and controlled before-and-after studies that reported an objective measure of at least one of the following outcomes: healthcare utilisation, health expenditures, or health outcomes.

Data collection and analysis

We re-analysed studies with longitudinal data. We computed price elasticities of demand for health services in controlled before-and-after studies as a standardised measure. Due to the diversity of contexts and outcome measures, we did not perform meta-analysis. Instead, we undertook a narrative summary of evidence.

Main results

We included 16 studies out of the 243 identified. Most of the included studies showed methodological weaknesses that hamper the strength and reliability of their findings. When fees were introduced or increased, we found the use of health services decreased significantly in most studies. Two studies found increases in health service use when quality improvements were introduced at the same time as user fees. However, these studies have a high risk of bias. We found no evidence of effects on health outcomes or health expenditure.

Authors' conclusions

The review suggests that reducing or removing user fees increases the utilisation of certain healthcare services. However, emerging evidence suggests that such a change may have unintended consequences on utilisation of preventive services and service quality. The review also found that introducing or increasing fees can have a negative impact on health services utilisation, although some evidence suggests that when implemented with quality improvements these interventions could be beneficial. Most of the included studies suffered from important methodological weaknesses. More rigorous research is needed to inform debates on the desirability and effects of user fees.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

The impact of user fees on access to health services in low- and middle-income countries

Researchers in the Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the impact of user fees on people’s access to health services in low- and middle-income countries. After searching for all relevant studies, they found 16 studies. Their findings are summarised below.

User fees and people’s use of health services

In many countries, people may have to pay a charge, or user fee, for their health services, for instance when visiting the doctor or receiving drugs and other medical supplies.

User fees were introduced in many low- and middle-income countries in the 1980s with the support of UNICEF and the World Bank. A number of reasons were given for the introduction of these fees. One argument is that user fees are expected to stop people from seeking unnecessary health care. They are also seen as a way to raise extra funds that can be used to improve the quality of health services. These extra funds can also be used to expand health services and ensure that the whole population gets access to health care.

Critics have, however, argued that the introduction of user fees prevents poor people from using necessary health services. Recently, several campaigns have advocated the removal of user fees, especially for primary care.

What happens when user fees are introduced or removed?

The studies in this review took place in 12 different countries. They evaluated either the effects of introducing user fees; removing fees; or increasing or decreasing fees. The studies varied according to the type of health services and the level and nature of payment. While some of the studies looked at the impact of large-scale national reforms, other studies looked at small-scale pilot projects.

All of the evidence was of very low quality and the studies showed mixed results:

When user fees were introduced or increased:

- People’s use of preventive healthcare services decreased.

- People’s use of curative services generally decreased. However, when quality improvements were made to the health services at the same time as fees were introduced, people’s use of curative services increased. In addition, poor parts of the population began to use health care services more.

 When user fees were removed:

- There was usually no immediate impact on people’s use of preventive healthcare services. But in several cases, people’s use of these services did increase after some time.

- There was some increase in the number of outpatient visits, but no increase in the number of inpatient visits.

When user fees were decreased:

- There was an increase in the use of preventive and curative healthcare services, ranging from a very small to a large increase.

To summarise, results were mixed and the quality of the evidence was very low. We are therefore uncertain about the effects of user fees on health service use.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Repercusión de las estrategias de financiamiento sanitario en el acceso a los servicios de salud en países de ingresos bajos y medios

Después de presiones a nivel internacional sobre reformas de financiamiento, muchos países de ingresos bajos y medios introdujeron estrategias de financiamiento sanitario para los usuarios con el objetivo de aumentar los ingresos adicionales de los sistemas de salud. Las estrategias de financiamiento sanitario para los usuarios son los costos exigidos en el momento de utilizar los servicios y se supone que ayudan a reducir el consumo “frívolo” de los servicios de salud, aumentar la calidad de los servicios disponibles y, como resultado, aumentar el uso de los servicios.

Objetivos

Evaluar la efectividad de introducir, eliminar o cambiar las estrategias de financiamiento sanitario en los usuarios para mejorar el acceso a los servicios de salud en los países de ingresos bajos y medios

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en 25 bases de datos internacionales, incluyendo el Registro de Ensayos del Grupo Cochrane para una Práctica y Organización Sanitaria Efectivas (Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care, EPOC), CENTRAL, MEDLINE y EMBASE. También se buscó en los sitios web y en recursos en línea de organismos internacionales, organizaciones y universidades para encontrar literatura gris pertinente. Se realizaron las búsquedas originales entre noviembre 2005 y abril 2006 y la búsqueda actualizada en CENTRAL (DVDROM 2011, número 1); MEDLINE InProcess & Other NonIndexed Citations, Ovid (25 enero, 2011); MEDLINE, Ovid (1948 hasta enero, semana 2, 2011); EMBASE, Ovid (1980 hasta 2011, semana 03) y en EconLit, CSA Illumina (1969  presente) el 26 de enero 2011.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios, estudios de series de tiempo interrumpido y estudios controlados tipo antes y después (before and after studies) que informaron una medida objetiva de al menos uno de los resultados siguientes: utilización de la asistencia sanitaria, gastos sanitarios o resultados de salud.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Se volvieron a analizar los estudios con datos longitudinales. En los estudios controlados del tipo antes y después (before and after studies), la elasticidad de los precios de la demanda de servicios de salud se computaron como una medida estandarizada. No se realizó un metanálisis debido a la diversidad de contextos y medidas de resultado. En su lugar se realizó un resumen narrativo de las pruebas.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron 16 estudios de 243 identificados. La mayoría de los estudios incluidos mostró deficiencias metodológicas que afectan la fortaleza y la confiabilidad de sus resultados. Cuando se introdujo o se aumentó el financiamiento sanitario se encontró que el uso de los servicios de salud se redujo significativamente en la mayoría de los estudios. Dos estudios encontraron un aumento del uso de los servicios de salud cuando se introdujeron mejorías en la calidad al mismo tiempo que las estrategias de financiamiento sanitario para los usuarios. Sin embargo, estos estudios tienen un alto riesgo de sesgo. No se encontraron pruebas de los efectos sobre los resultados sanitarios ni sobre el gasto sanitario.

Conclusiones de los autores

La revisión indica que la reducción o la eliminación del financiamiento sanitario para los usuarios aumentan la utilización de algunos servicios de asistencia sanitaria. Sin embargo, las pruebas emergentes indican que tal cambio puede tener consecuencias no planificadas sobre la utilización de los servicios preventivos y la calidad de los servicios. La revisión también encontró que la introducción o el aumento del financiamiento sanitario pueden tener una repercusión negativa sobre la utilización de los servicios de salud, aunque algunas pruebas indican que cuando se implementan con mejorías en la calidad estas intervenciones podrían ser beneficiosas. La mayoría de los estudios incluidos presentaron deficiencias metodológicas importantes. Se necesitan investigaciones más rigurosas que aporten información a los debates sobre la conveniencia y los efectos de las estrategias de financiamiento sanitario para los usuarios.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Impact du paiement direct sur l'accès aux services de santé dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Contexte

Suivant une campagne internationale visant à imposer des réformes financières, de nombreux pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire ont instauré le paiement direct afin de constituer un revenu supplémentaire pour les systèmes de santé. Le paiement direct est une charge prélevée au moment de l'utilisation et est supposé permettre la réduction de la consommation « fantaisiste » des services de santé, accroître la qualité des services accessibles et, comme résultante, augmenter l'utilisation des services.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de l'instauration, de la suppression ou du changement du paiement direct pour améliorer l'accès aux soins dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans 25 bases de données internationales, y compris dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'efficacité des pratiques et l'organisation des soins (EPOC), CENTRAL, MEDLINE et EMBASE. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les sites et les ressources en ligne des institutions et des organisations internationales et des universités afin de trouver de la littérature grise pertinente. Nous avons effectué les premières recherches entre novembre 2005 et avril 2006 et une recherche de mise à jour dans CENTRAL (DVD-ROM 2011, numéro 1) ; MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid (25 janvier 2011) ; MEDLINE, Ovid (1948 jusqu'à la 2ème semaine du mois de janvier 2011) ; EMBASE, Ovid (1980 jusqu'à la 3ème semaine de 2011) et dans EconLit, CSA Illumina (1969 - jusqu'à présent) le 26 janvier 2011.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés, des séries temporelles interrompues et des études comparatives avant-après qui rapportaient une mesure objective d'au moins l'un des critères de jugement suivants : utilisation des services de soins de santé, dépenses de santé ou résultats sur la santé.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons ré-analysés les études avec des données longitudinales. Nous avons calculé l'inconstance des prix de la demande pour des services de santé dans les études comparatives avant-après considérée comme mesure standard. Compte tenu de la diversité des contextes et des résultats estimés, nous n'avons pas réalisé de méta-analyse. A la place, nous avons élaboré un résumé narratif des preuves.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 16 études sur les 243 identifiées. La plupart des études incluses comportaient des limites méthodologiques qui réduisaient la qualité des résultats. Quand les frais étaient instaurés ou augmentés, nous avons découvert que l'utilisation des services de santé avait diminué de façon significative dans la plupart des études. Deux études ont permis de démontrer que l'utilisation des services de santé augmentait lorsque des améliorations étaient apportées à la qualité au moment de l'instauration du paiement direct. Ces études présentent toutefois un risque élevé de biais. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves présentant les effets sur les résultats ou les dépenses de santé.

Conclusions des auteurs

La revue avance que la réduction ou la suppression du paiement direct augmente l'utilisation de certains services de soins de santé. Toutefois, des preuves récentes suggèrent qu'un tel changement peut entraîner des conséquences non intentionnelles sur l'utilisation des services de soins préventifs et sur la qualité des services. La revue a aussi découvert que l'instauration ou l'augmentation des frais peut avoir un impact négatif sur l'utilisation des services de santé, même si certaines preuves suggèrent lorsqu' elles étaient mises en œuvre en apportant des améliorations à la qualité, ces interventions pouvaient être bénéfiques. La plupart des études incluses souffraient d'importantes faiblesses méthodologiques. Des recherches plus rigoureuses sont nécessaires pour fournir des informations aux discussions sur la nécessité et les effets du paiement direct.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Impact du paiement direct sur l'accès aux services de santé dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Impact du paiement direct sur l'accès aux services de santé dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Les chercheurs de la Collaboration Cochrane ont procédé à une revue de l'impact du paiement direct sur l'accès des personnes vivant dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire aux services de santé. Après avoir recherché toutes les études pertinentes, ils en ont trouvé 16. Leurs résultats sont résumés ci-dessous.

Paiement direct et accès des personnes aux services de santé

Dans de nombreux pays, il se peut que les personnes aient à payer des frais pour leurs services de santé ou paiement direct, par exemple pour une consultation chez le médecin ou l'obtention des médicaments et d'autres besoins d’ordre médical.

Le paiement direct a été instauré dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire dans les années 1980 avec l’appui de l'UNICEF et de la Banque Mondiale. Un certain nombre de raisons étaient avancées en faveur de l'instauration de ce paiement direct. Un argument est que le paiement direct est supposé dissuader les personnes à recourir aux soins de santé inutiles. Il est également perçu comme étant un moyen de réunir des fonds supplémentaires qui peuvent être utilisés pour améliorer la qualité des services de santé. Ces fonds supplémentaires peuvent aussi être utilisés pour développer les services de santé et garantir que toute la population accède aux soins de santé.

Cependant, des remarques selon lesquelles l’instauration du paiement direct empêchait les populations démunies d’utiliser des services de santé prioritaires ont été avancées. Récemment, plusieurs campagnes ont été menées préconisant la suppression du paiement direct, en particulier pour les soins primaires.

Que se passe-t-il lorsque le paiement direct est instauré ou supprimé?

Les études examinées dans cette revue se sont déroulées dans 12 pays différents. Elles évaluaient soit les effets de l'instauration du paiement direct ; sa suppression ; soit l'augmentation ou la diminution des frais. Les études variaient selon le type des services de santé, le niveau et la nature de la rémunération. Tandis que certaines des études considéraient l'impact des grandes réformes nationales, d'autres études examinaient les petits projets pilotes.

La qualité de toutes les preuves était très faible et les études aboutissaient à des résultats mitigés :

Lorsque le paiement direct était instauré ou augmenté :

- L'utilisation des services de soins de santé préventifs par les populations diminuait.

- L'utilisation des services curatifs par les personnes diminuait globalement. Toutefois, lorsque des améliorations étaient apportées à la qualité des services de santé en même temps que l'instauration du paiement direct, l'utilisation des services curatifs par les personnes augmentait. En outre, les catégories pauvres de la population commençaient à utiliser davantage les services de soins de santé.

 Lorsque le paiement direct était supprimé :

- Généralement, il n'y avait pas d'impact immédiat sur l'utilisation des services de soins de santé préventifs par les populations. Mais dans plusieurs cas, l'utilisation par les populations de ces services avait augmenté après quelque temps.

- Il y avait une certaine augmentation du nombre de consultations médicales, mais il n'y avait pas d'augmentation du nombre de visites de patients hospitalisés.

Lorsque le paiement direct était diminué :

- Il y avait une augmentation de l'utilisation des services de soins de santé préventifs et curatifs, augmentation allant de très faible à importante.

Pour résumer, les résultats étaient mitigés et la qualité des preuves était très faible. Les effets du paiement direct sur l'utilisation des services de santé sont par conséquent incertains.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 21st August, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français