Intervention Review

Phonics training for English-speaking poor readers

  1. Genevieve McArthur*,
  2. Philippa M Eve,
  3. Kristy Jones,
  4. Erin Banales,
  5. Saskia Kohnen,
  6. Thushara Anandakumar,
  7. Linda Larsen,
  8. Eva Marinus,
  9. Hua-Chen Wang,
  10. Anne Castles

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 3 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009115.pub2


How to Cite

McArthur G, Eve PM, Jones K, Banales E, Kohnen S, Anandakumar T, Larsen L, Marinus E, Wang HC, Castles A. Phonics training for English-speaking poor readers. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009115. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009115.pub2.

Author Information

  1. Macquarie University, ARC Centre of Excellence of Cognition and its Disorders, Department of Cognitive Science, Sydney, NSW, Australia

*Genevieve McArthur, ARC Centre of Excellence of Cognition and its Disorders, Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia. genevieve.mcarthur@mq.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Around 5% of English speakers have a significant problem with learning to read words. Poor word readers are often trained to use letter-sound rules to improve their reading skills. This training is commonly called phonics. Well over 100 studies have administered some form of phonics training to poor word readers. However, there are surprisingly few systematic reviews or meta-analyses of these studies. The most well-known review was done by the National Reading Panel (Ehri 2001) 12 years ago and needs updating. The most recent review (Suggate 2010) focused solely on children and did not include unpublished studies.

Objectives

The primary aim of this review was to measure the effect that phonics training has on the literacy skills of English-speaking children, adolescents, and adults whose reading was at least one standard deviation (SD), one year, or one grade below the expected level, despite no reported problems that could explain their impaired ability to learn to read. A secondary objective was to explore the impact of various factors, such as length of training or training group size, that might moderate the effect of phonics training on poor word reading skills.

Search methods

We searched the following databases in July 2012: CENTRAL 2012 (Issue 6), MEDLINE 1948 to June week 3 2012, EMBASE 1980 to 2012 week 26, DARE 2013 (Issue 6), ERIC (1966 to current), PsycINFO (1806 to current), CINAHL (1938 to current), Science Citation Index (1970 to 29 June 2012), Social Science Citation Index (1970 to 29 June 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (1990 to 29 June 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Science & Humanities (1990 to 29 June 2012), ZETOC, Index to Theses-UK and Ireland, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, DART Europe E-theses Portal, Australasian Digital Theses Program, Education Research Theses, Electronic Theses Online System, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations. Theses Canada portal, www.dissertation.com, and www.thesisabstracts.com. We also contacted experts and examined the reference lists of published studies.

Selection criteria

We included studies that use randomisation, quasi-randomisation, or minimisation to allocate participants to either a phonics intervention group (phonics alone, phonics and phoneme awareness training, or phonics and irregular word reading training) or a control group (no training or alternative training, such as maths). Participants were English-speaking children, adolescents, or adults whose word reading was below the level expected for their age for no known reason (that is, they had adequate attention and no known physical, neurological, or psychological problems).

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data.

Main results

We found 11 studies that met the criteria for this review. They involved 736 participants. We measured the effect of phonics training on eight outcomes. The amount of evidence for each outcome varied considerably, ranging from 10 studies for word reading accuracy to one study for nonword reading fluency. The effect sizes for the outcomes were: word reading accuracy standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06 to 0.88; 10 studies), nonword reading accuracy SMD 0.76 (95% CI 0.25 to 1.27; eight studies), word reading fluency SMD -0.51 (95% CI -1.14 to 0.13; two studies), reading comprehension SMD 0.14 (95% CI -0.46 to 0.74; three studies), spelling SMD 0.36 (95% CI -0.27 to 1.00; two studies), letter-sound knowledge SMD 0.35 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.65; three studies), and phonological output SMD 0.38 (95% -0.04 to 0.80; four studies). There was one result in a negative direction for nonword reading fluency SMD 0.38 (95% CI -0.55 to 1.32; one study), though this was not statistically significant.

We did five subgroup analyses on two outcomes that had sufficient data (word reading accuracy and nonword reading accuracy). The efficacy of phonics training was not moderated significantly by training type (phonics alone versus phonics and phoneme awareness versus phonics and irregular word training), training intensity (less than two hours per week versus at least two hours per week), training duration (less than three months versus at least three months), training group size (one-on-one versus small group training), or training administrator (human administration versus computer administration).

Authors' conclusions

Phonics training appears to be effective for improving some reading skills. Specifically, statistically significant effects were found for nonword reading accuracy (large effect), word reading accuracy (moderate effect), and letter-sound knowledge (small-to-moderate effect). For several other outcomes, there were small or moderate effect sizes that did not reach statistical significance but may be meaningful: word reading fluency, spelling, phonological output, and reading comprehension. The effect for nonword reading fluency, which was measured in only one study, was in a negative direction, but this was not statistically significant.

Future studies of phonics training need to improve the reporting of procedures used for random sequence generation, allocation concealment, and blinding of participants, personnel, and outcome assessment.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Phonics training for English-speaking poor readers

Around 5% of English speakers have a significant problem with learning to read words. Poor word readers are often trained to use letter-sound rules to improve their reading skills. This training is commonly called phonics. The primary aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of phonics training for improving eight literacy skills in English-speaking poor word readers. A secondary objective was to explore the impact of various factors, such as training duration and training group size, that might moderate the effect of phonics training on poor word reading skills.

We found 11 studies that met the criteria for this review. These studies involved a total of 736 people. The amount of evidence for each literacy skill varied considerably, ranging from around 10 studies for word reading accuracy to just one study for nonword reading fluency.

The outcomes suggests that phonics training may be effective for improving some reading skills. Specifically, it seems to have a large effect on nonword reading accuracy, a moderate effect on word reading accuracy, and a small-to-moderate effect on letter-sound knowledge. For some outcomes (word reading fluency, spelling, phonological output, and reading comprehension), phonics training may have a small or moderate effect but it is difficult to be sure as the results found could also be due to chance. Results for nonword reading fluency, which was measured in only one study, were in a negative direction but again, this may be a chance finding.

Future studies of phonics training need to improve how they report the procedure used to put participants into groups and how they try to ensure participants do not know whether they are part of the 'experimental' group or the 'control' group. Studies should also report clearly how they ensure those measuring children's reading progress do not know if they have been part of the phonics training group or not.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation à la phonétique pour les anglophones ayant des difficultés à lire

Contexte

Environ 5 % des anglophones ont un gros problème d'apprentissage de la lecture de mots. Les personnes ayant des difficultés à lire des mots sont souvent formées à l'utilisation de règles d'association de lettres et de sons pour améliorer leurs compétences en lecture. Dans la langue courante, on appelle cette formation la phonétique. Bien plus de 100 études ont dispensé une formation à la phonétique, quelle qu'elle soit, aux personnes ayant des difficultés à lire des mots. Cependant, il existe étonnamment peu de revues systématiques ou de méta-analyses de ces études. La revue la plus connue a été réalisée par le National Reading Panel (Ehri 2001) il y a 12 ans et doit être mise à jour. La revue la plus récente (Suggate 2010) s'est intéressée uniquement aux enfants et n'a pas inclus d'études non publiées.

Objectifs

L'objectif principal de cette revue était de mesurer l'effet de la formation à la phonétique sur les aptitudes à lire et à écrire d'enfants, d'adolescents et d'adultes anglophones dont le niveau de lecture était inférieur d'au moins un écart type (SD), d'un an ou d'une classe par rapport au niveau attendu, malgré l'absence de problèmes rapportés qui pourraient expliquer leur difficulté à apprendre à lire. Un objectif secondaire était d'examiner l'impact de différents facteurs, tels que la durée de la formation et la taille des groupes de formation, qui pourraient modérer l'effet de la formation à la phonétique sur les mauvaises compétences en lecture.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En juillet 2012, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : CENTRAL 2012 (numéro 6), MEDLINE de 1948 à la semaine 3 de juin 2012, EMBASE de 1980 à la semaine 26 de 2012, DARE 2013 (numéro 6), ERIC (de 1966 à aujourd'hui), PsycINFO (de 1806 à aujourd'hui), CINAHL (de 1938 à aujourd'hui), Science Citation Index (de 1970 au 29 juin 2012), Social Science Citation Index (de 1970 au 29 juin 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (de 1990 au 29 juin 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Science & Humanities (de 1990 au 29 juin 2012), ZETOC, Index to Theses-UK and Ireland, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP, le méta-registre des essais contrôlés, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, DART Europe E-theses Portal, Australasian Digital Theses Program, Education Research Theses, Electronic Theses Online System, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations. Theses Canada portal, www.dissertation.com et www.thesisabstracts.com. Nous avons également contacté des experts et examiné les listes bibliographiques d'études publiées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des études qui utilisaient une randomisation, une quasi-randomisation ou une minimisation pour assigner les participants à un groupe d'intervention de phonétique (phonétique seule, phonétique et formation à l'identification des phonèmes ou phonétique et formation à la lecture de mots irréguliers) ou à un groupe témoin (absence de formation ou autre formation, par ex. en mathématiques). Les participants étaient des enfants, des adolescents ou des adultes anglophones dont la lecture de mots était en-deçà du niveau attendu pour leur âge en l'absence de raison connue (c'est-à-dire qu'ils avaient une attention adéquate et n'avaient aucun problème physique, neurologique ou psychologique connu).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné les études, évalué leurs risques de biais et extrait les données de façon indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons trouvé 11 études répondant aux critères d'inclusion de cette revue. Elles portaient sur 736 participants. Nous avons mesuré l'effet de la formation à la phonétique sur huit critères de jugement. La quantité de preuves pour chaque critère de jugement variait considérablement, de 10 études pour l'exactitude de la lecture de mots à une étude pour la fluidité de la lecture de non-mots. Les quantités d'effet pour les critères de jugement ont été les suivantes : différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) pour l'exactitude de la lecture de mots 0,47 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,06 à 0,88 ; 10 études), DMS pour l'exactitude de la lecture de non-mots 0,76 (IC à 95 % 0,25 à 1,27 ; huit études), DMS pour la fluidité de la lecture de mots -0,51 (IC à 95 % -1,14 à 0,13 ; deux études), DMS pour la compréhension à la lecture 0,14 (IC à 95 % -0,46 à 0,74 ; trois études), DMS pour l'orthographe 0,36 (IC à 95 % -0,27 à 1,00 ; deux études), DMS pour la connaissance des correspondances entre les lettres et les sons 0,35 (IC à 95 % 0,04 à 0,65 ; trois études) et DMS pour la production phonologique 0,38 (IC à 95 % -0,04 à 0,80 ; quatre études). Il y a eu un résultat orienté négativement concernant le DMS pour la fluidité de la lecture de non-mots 0,38 (IC à 95 % -0,55 à 1,32 ; une étude), bien que cela n'ait pas été statistiquement significatif.

Nous avons réalisé cinq études en sous-groupe sur deux critères de jugement qui disposaient de données suffisantes (exactitude de la lecture de mots et exactitude de la lecture de non-mots). L'efficacité de la formation à la phonétique n'a pas été modérée significativement par le type de formation (phonétique seule versus phonétique et formation à l'identification des phonèmes versus phonétique et formation à la lecture de mots irréguliers), la durée de la formation (moins de trois mois versus au moins trois mois), la taille du groupe de formation (formation individuelle versus en petit groupe) ou le responsable de la formation (responsable humain versus formation informatisée).

Conclusions des auteurs

La formation à la phonétique semble efficace pour améliorer certaines compétences en lecture. Précisément, des effets statistiquement significatifs ont été découverts pour l'exactitude de la lecture de non-mots (effet important), l'exactitude de la lecture de mots (effet modéré) et la connaissance des correspondances entre les lettres et les sons (effet faible à modéré). Pour plusieurs autres critères de jugement, on a observé des quantités d'effet faibles ou modérées qui n'ont pas atteint une signification statistique, mais qui peuvent être utiles : fluidité de la lecture de mots, orthographe, production phonologique et compréhension à la lecture. L'effet pour la fluidité de la lecture de non-mots, qui n'a été mesurée que dans une seule étude, était orienté négativement, mais cela n'était pas statistiquement significatif.

Les études à venir concernant la formation à la phonétique doivent améliorer la notification des procédures utilisées pour la génération de séquences aléatoires, l'assignation secrète et la mise en aveugle des participants, du personnel, et l'évaluation des critères de jugement.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation à la phonétique pour les anglophones ayant des difficultés à lire

Formation à la phonétique pour les anglophones ayant des difficultés à lire

Environ 5 % des anglophones ont un gros problème d'apprentissage de la lecture de mots. Les personnes ayant des difficultés à lire des mots sont souvent formées à l'utilisation de règles d'association de lettres et de sons pour améliorer leurs compétences en lecture. Dans la langue courante, on appelle cette formation la phonétique. Le principal objectif de cette revue était de déterminer l'efficacité de la formation à la phonétique pour améliore huit aptitudes à lire et à écrire chez des anglophones ayant des difficultés de lecture. Un objectif secondaire était d'examiner l'impact de différents facteurs, tels que la durée de la formation et la taille des groupes de formation, qui pourraient modérer l'effet de la formation à la phonétique sur les mauvaises compétences en lecture de mots.

Nous avons trouvé 11 études répondant aux critères d'inclusion de cette revue. Ces études impliquaient un total de 736 personnes. La quantité de preuves pour chaque aptitude à lire et à écrire variait considérablement, d'environ 10 études pour l'exactitude de la lecture de mots à une seule étude pour la fluidité de la lecture de non-mots.

Les critères d'évaluation suggèrent que la formation à la phonétique peut être efficace pour améliorer certaines compétences en lecture. Précisément, elle semble avoir un important effet sur l'exactitude de la lecture de non-mots, un effet modéré sur l'exactitude de la lecture de mots et un effet faible à modéré sur la connaissance des correspondances entre les lettres et les sons. Pour certains critères d'évaluation (la fluidité de la lecture de mots, l'orthographe, la production phonologique et la compréhension à la lecture), la formation à la phonétique peut avoir un effet faible ou modéré, mais il est difficile d'avoir des certitudes, car les résultats constatés pourraient également être dus au hasard. Les résultats concernant la fluidité de la lecture de non-mots, qui n'a été mesurée que dans une seule étude, étaient orientés négativement, mais là encore, cela peut être un résultat dû au hasard.

Les études futures concernant la formation à la phonétique doivent améliorer la manière dont elles rendent compte de la procédure utilisée pour placer les participants dans des groupes et la manière dont elles tentent de s'assurer que les participants ne sachent pas s'ils font partie du groupe « expérimental » ou du groupe « témoin ». Les études devront également indiquer clairement la manière dont elles garantissent que les personnes mesurant les progrès des enfants en lecture ne sachent pas s'ils ont été affectés au groupe de formation à la phonétique ou non.

Notes de traduction

Aucun.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th January, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�