Intervention Review

Osmotic and stimulant laxatives for the management of childhood constipation

  1. Morris Gordon1,2,
  2. Khimara Naidoo3,
  3. Anthony K Akobeng1,
  4. Adrian G Thomas1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group

Published Online: 11 JUL 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009118.pub2

How to Cite

Gordon M, Naidoo K, Akobeng AK, Thomas AG. Osmotic and stimulant laxatives for the management of childhood constipation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009118. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009118.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    University of Salford, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Salford, UK

  3. 3

    Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

*Adrian G Thomas, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL, UK. adrian.thomas@cmft.nhs.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 11 JUL 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Constipation within childhood is an extremely common problem. Despite the widespread use of osmotic and stimulant laxatives by health professionals to manage constipation in children, there has been a long standing paucity of high quality evidence to support this practice.

Objectives

We set out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of osmotic and stimulant laxatives used to treat functional childhood constipation.

Search methods

The search (inception to May 7, 2012) was standardised and not limited by language and included electronic searching (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group Specialized Trials Register), reference searching of all included studies, personal contacts and drug companies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared osmotic or stimulant laxatives with either placebo or another intervention, with patients aged 0 to 18 years old were considered for inclusion. The primary outcome was frequency of defecation. Secondary endpoints included faecal incontinence, disimpaction, need for additional therapies and adverse events.

Data collection and analysis

Relevant papers were identified and the authors independently assessed the eligibility of trials. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.The Cochrane RevMan software was used for analyses. Patients with final missing outcomes were assumed to have relapsed. For continuous outcomes we calculated a mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using a fixed-effect model. For dichotomous outcomes we calculated an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using a fixed-effect model. The chi square and I2 statistics were used to assess statistical heterogeneity. A random-effects model was used in situations of unexplained heterogeneity

Main results

Eighteen RCTs (1643 patients) were included in the review. Nine studies were judged to be at high risk of bias due to lack of blinding, incomplete outcome data and selective reporting. Meta-analysis of two studies (101 patients) comparing polyethylene glycol (PEG) with placebo showed a significantly increased number of stools per week with PEG (MD 2.61 stools per week, 95% CI 1.15 to 4.08). Common adverse events in the placebo-controlled studies included flatulence, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhoea and headache. Meta-analysis of 4 studies with 338 participants comparing PEG with lactulose showed significantly greater stools per week with PEG (MD 0.95 stools per week, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.44), although follow up was short. Patients who received PEG were significantly less likely to require additional laxative therapies. Eighteen per cent of PEG patients required additional therapies compared to 30% of lactulose patients (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.89). No serious adverse events were reported with either agent. Common adverse events in these studies included diarrhoea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and pruritis ani. Meta-analysis of 3 studies with 211 participants comparing PEG with milk of magnesia showed that the stools/wk was significantly greater with PEG (MD 0.69 stools per week, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.89). However, the magnitude of this difference is quite small and may not be clinically significant. One child was noted to be allergic to PEG, but there were no other serious adverse events reported. Meta-analysis of 2 studies with 287 patients comparing liquid paraffin (mineral oil) with lactulose revealed a relatively large statistically significant difference in the number of stools per week favouring paraffin (MD 4.94 stools per week, 95% CI 4.28 to 5.61). No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events included abdominal pain, distention and watery stools. No statistically significant differences in the number of stools per week were found between PEG and enemas (1 study, 90 patients, MD 1.00, 95% CI -1.58 to 3.58), dietary fibre mix and lactulose (1 study, 125 patients, P = 0.481), senna and lactulose (1 study, 21 patients, P > 0.05), lactitol and lactulose (1 study, 51 patients, MD -0.80, 95% CI -2.63 to 1.03), and PEG and liquid paraffin (1 study, 158 patients, MD 0.70, 95% CI -0.38 to 1.78).

Authors' conclusions

The pooled analyses suggest that PEG preparations may be superior to placebo, lactulose and milk of magnesia for childhood constipation. GRADE analyses indicated that the overall quality of the evidence for the primary outcome (number of stools per week) was low or very low due to sparse data, inconsistency (heterogeneity), and high risk of bias in the studies in the pooled analyses. Thus, the results of the pooled analyses should be interpreted with caution because of quality and methodological concerns, as well as clinical heterogeneity, and short follow up. However, PEG appears safe and well tolerated. There is also evidence suggesting the efficacy of liquid paraffin (mineral oil), which was also well tolerated.There is no evidence to demonstrate the superiority of lactulose when compared to the other agents studied, although there is a lack of placebo controlled studies. Further research is needed to investigate the long term use of PEG for childhood constipation, as well as the role of liquid paraffin.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Laxatives for the management of childhood constipation

Constipation within childhood is an extremely common problem. Despite the widespread use of laxatives by health professionals to manage constipation in children, there has been a long standing lack of evidence to support this practice.This review included eighteen studies with a total of 1643 patients that compared nine different agents to either placebo (inactive medications) or each other. The results of this review suggest that polyethylene glycol preparations may increase the frequency of bowel motions in constipated children. Polyethylene glycol was generally safe, with lower rates of minor side effects compared to other agents. Common side effects included flatulence, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhoea and headache. There was also some evidence that liquid paraffin (mineral oil) increased the frequency of bowel motions in constipated children and was also safe. Common side effects with liquid paraffin included abdominal pain, distention and watery stools. There was no evidence to suggest that lactulose is superior to the other agents studied, although there were no trials comparing it to placebo. The results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to methodological quality and statistical issues in the included studies. In addition, these studies were relatively short in duration and so it is difficult to assess the long term effectiveness of these agents for the treatment of childhood constipation. Long term effectiveness is important, given the often chronic nature of this problem in children.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Laxatifs osmotiques et laxatifs stimulants pour la prise en charge de la constipation de l'enfant

Contexte

Durant l'enfance, la constipation est un problème extrêmement fréquent. Malgré l'utilisation très répandue de laxatifs osmotiques et de laxatifs stimulants par le personnel médical pour la prise en charge de la constipation chez l'enfant, on manque depuis toujours de preuves de bonne qualité pouvant étayer cette pratique.

Objectifs

Nous avons cherché à évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité des laxatifs osmotiques et des laxatifs stimulants utilisés pour traiter la constipation fonctionnelle de l'enfant.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

La recherche (des origines jusqu'au 7 mai 2012) fut normalisée et non limitée par la langue ; elle incluait la recherche électronique (Medline, Embase, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés, le registre spécialisé des essais du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies inflammatoires de l'intestin et les troubles fonctionnels intestinaux), le passage au crible des références bibliographiques de toutes les études incluses, des contacts personnels et des compagnies pharmaceutiques.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons considéré l'inclusion de tout essai contrôlé randomisé (ECR) ayant comparé des laxatifs osmotiques ou des laxatifs stimulants à un placebo ou à une autre intervention, chez des patients âgés de 0 à 18 ans. Le principal critère de jugement était la fréquence de défécation. Les critères secondaires incluaient l'incontinence fécale, la désimpaction, le besoin de traitements complémentaires et les événements indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Des articles pertinents ont été identifiés et les auteurs ont évalué, de manière indépendante, l'éligibilité des essais. La qualité méthodologique a été évaluée à l'aide de l'outil Cochrane de détermination des risques de biais. Le logiciel RevMan de Cochrane a été utilisé pour les analyses. Les patients pour qui manquaient les résultats finaux ont été considérés comme ayant rechuté. Pour les résultats de type continu, nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) ainsi que l'intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % au moyen d'un modèle à effet fixe. Pour les résultats de type dichotomique, nous avons calculé le rapport de cotes (RC) ainsi que l'intervalle de confiance (IC à 95 %) au moyen d'un modèle à effet fixe. Les statistiques chi-carré et I2 ont été utilisées pour évaluer l'hétérogénéité statistique. Un modèle à effets aléatoires a été utilisé en cas d'hétérogénéité inexpliquée.

Résultats Principaux

Dix-huit études (soit 1 643 participants) ont été incluses dans la revue. Neuf études ont été jugées à risque élevé de biais pour manque de masquage, données de résultat incomplètes et compte-rendu sélectif. La méta-analyse de deux études (101 patients) comparant le polyéthylène glycol (PEG) à un placebo a montré un nombre significativement accru de selles par semaine avec le PEG (DM 2,61 selles par semaine ; IC à 95 % 1,15 à 4,08). Les événements indésirables les plus fréquents dans les études contrôlées par placebo étaient notamment les flatulences, les douleurs abdominales, les nausées, les diarrhées et les maux de tête. La méta-analyse de 4 études, soit 338 participants, ayant comparé le PEG au lactulose a montré qu'il y avait significativement plus de selles par semaine avec le PEG (DM 0,95 selles par semaine ; IC à 95 % 0,46 à 1,44), bien que le suivi ait été court. Les patients ayant reçu du PEG étaient significativement moins susceptibles d'avoir besoin de traitements laxatifs supplémentaires. Dix-huit pour cent des patients du groupe à PEG avaient nécessité des traitements supplémentaires, à comparer à 30 % dans le groupe à lactulose (RC 0,49 ; IC à 95 % 0,27 à 0,89). Aucun des agents n'avait occasionné d'effet indésirable grave. Les événements indésirables les plus communs dans ces études étaient notamment la diarrhée, la douleur abdominale, la nausée, le vomissement et le prurit anal. La méta-analyse de 3 études, soit 211 participants, comparant le PEG au lait de magnésie a montré que le nombre de selles par semaine était significativement plus élevé avec le PEG (DM 0,69 selles par semaine ; IC à 95 % 0,48 à 0,89). Cette différence est toutefois de très petite ampleur et n'est peut-être pas significative cliniquement. Une allergie au PEG avait été remarquée chez un enfant, mais aucun autre effet indésirable grave n'avait été signalé. La méta-analyse de 2 études, soit 287 patients, comparant la paraffine liquide (de l'huile minérale) au lactulose a révélé une différence statistiquement significative et relativement importante dans le nombre de selles par semaine en faveur de la paraffine (DM 4,94 selles par semaine ; IC à 95 % 4,28 à 5,61). Aucun effet indésirable grave n'avait été signalé. Les événements indésirables étaient notamment la douleur abdominale, la distension et les selles liquides. Aucune différence statistiquement significative dans le nombre de selles par semaine n'avait été trouvée entre le PEG et les lavements (1 étude, 90 patients ; DM 1,00 ; IC à 95 % -1,58 à 3,58), le mélange de fibres alimentaires et le lactulose (1 étude, 125 patients ; P = 0,481), le séné et le lactulose (1 étude, 21 patients ; P > 0,05), le lactitol et le lactulose (1 étude, 51 patients ; DM -0,80 ; IC à 95 % -2,63 à 1,03) ou le PEG et la paraffine liquide (1 étude, 158 patients ; DM 0,70 ; IC à 95 % -0,38 à 1,78).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les méta-analyses laissent penser que les préparations de PEG pourraient être supérieures au placebo, au lactulose et au lait de magnésie pour la constipation de l'enfant. Les analyses GRADE ont indiqué que la qualité globale des données pour le critère de jugement principal (le nombre de selles par semaine) était faible ou très faible en raison de données éparses, d'un manque de cohérence (hétérogénéité) et d'un risque élevé de biais dans les études regroupées pour analyse. Les résultats des méta-analyses doivent donc être interprétés avec prudence en raison de problèmes de qualité et de méthodologie, ainsi que de l'hétérogénéité clinique et du suivi de courte durée. Le PEG semble cependant sûr et bien toléré. Il y a également certaines preuves de l'efficacité de la paraffine liquide (de l'huile minérale), qui était aussi bien tolérée. Il n'existe aucune preuve d'une supériorité du lactulose sur les autres agents étudiés, bien qu'on manque d'études contrôlées par placebo. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour étudier l'utilisation à long terme du PEG pour la constipation de l'enfant, de même que le rôle de la paraffine liquide.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Laxatifs osmotiques et laxatifs stimulants pour la prise en charge de la constipation de l'enfant

Les laxatifs pour la prise en charge de la constipation de l'enfant

Durant l'enfance, la constipation est un problème extrêmement fréquent. Malgré l'utilisation très répandue de laxatifs par le personnel médical pour la prise en charge de la constipation chez les enfants, on manque depuis toujours de données probantes pouvant étayer cette pratique. Cette revue a inclus dix-huit études, soit un total de 1 643 patients, ayant comparé neuf agents différents, soit à un placebo (un médicament inactif) soit entre eux. Les résultats de cette revue suggèrent que les préparations de polyéthylène glycol peuvent augmenter la fréquence des selles chez les enfants constipés. Le polyéthylène glycol était généralement sûr, et avait moins d'effets secondaires mineurs que les autres agents. Les effets secondaires les plus courants étaient notamment les flatulences, les douleurs abdominales, les nausées, les diarrhées et les maux de tête. Il y avait aussi certaines preuves que la paraffine liquide (de l'huile minérale) augmentait la fréquence des selles chez les enfants constipés et était également sans danger. Les effets indésirables fréquents de la paraffine liquide étaient notamment les douleurs abdominales, la distension intestinale et les selles liquides. Il n'y avait pas de preuve d'une quelconque supériorité du lactulose sur les autres agents étudiés, bien qu'il n'y ait pas d'essais le comparant à un placebo. Les résultats de la revue doivent être interprétés avec prudence en raison de problèmes de qualité méthodologique et de statistique dans les études incluses. De plus, ces études étaient de relativement courte durée et il est donc difficile d'évaluer l'efficacité à long terme de ces agents pour le traitement de la constipation chez l'enfant. L'efficacité à long terme est importante, vue la nature souvent chronique de ce problème chez les enfants.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français