Intensive glucose control versus conventional glucose control for type 1 diabetes mellitus

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Birgit Fullerton,

    Corresponding author
    1. Goethe University, Institute of General Practice, Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Klaus Jeitler,

    1. Medical University of Graz, Institute of General Practice and Evidence-Based Health Services Research / Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Graz, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mirjam Seitz,

    1. München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Karl Horvath,

    1. Medical University of Graz, Institute of General Practice and Evidence-Based Health Services Research / Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Graz, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrea Berghold,

    1. Medical University of Graz, Institute of General Practice and Evidence-Based Health Services Research / Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Graz, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrea Siebenhofer

    1. Graz, Austria / Institute of General Practice, Goethe University, Institute of General Practice and Evidence-Based Health Services Research, Medical University of Graz, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Clinical guidelines differ regarding their recommended blood glucose targets for patients with type 1 diabetes and recent studies on patients with type 2 diabetes suggest that aiming at very low targets can increase the risk of mortality.

Objectives

To assess the effects of intensive versus conventional glycaemic targets in patients with type 1 diabetes in terms of long-term complications and determine whether very low, near normoglycaemic values are of additional benefit.

Search methods

A systematic literature search was performed in the databases The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE. The date of the last search was December 2012 for all databases.

Selection criteria

We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that had defined different glycaemic targets in the treatment arms, studied patients with type 1 diabetes, and had a follow-up duration of at least one year.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data, assessed studies for risk of bias, with differences resolved by consensus. Overall study quality was evaluated by the 'Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation' (GRADE) system. Random-effects models were used for the main analyses and the results are presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes.

Main results

We identified 12 trials that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including a total of 2230 patients. The patient populations varied widely across studies with one study only including children, one study only including patients after a kidney transplant, one study with newly diagnosed adult patients, and several studies where patients had retinopathy or microalbuminuria at baseline. The mean follow-up duration across studies varied between one and 6.5 years. The majority of the studies were carried out in the 1980s and all trials took place in Europe or North America. Due to the nature of the intervention, none of the studies could be carried out in a blinded fashion so that the risk of performance bias, especially for subjective outcomes such as hypoglycaemia, was present in all of the studies. Fifty per cent of the studies were judged to have a high risk of bias in at least one other category.

Under intensive glucose control, the risk of developing microvascular complications was reduced compared to conventional treatment for a) retinopathy: 23/371 (6.2%) versus 92/397 (23.2%); RR 0.27 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.42); P < 0.00001; 768 participants; 2 trials; high quality evidence; b) nephropathy: 119/732 (16.3%) versus 211/743 (28.4%); RR 0.56 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.68); P < 0.00001; 1475 participants; 3 trials; moderate quality evidence; c) neuropathy: 29/586 (4.9%) versus 86/617 (13.9%); RR 0.35 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.53); P < 0.00001; 1203 participants; 3 trials; high quality evidence. Regarding the progression of these complications after manifestation, the effect was weaker (retinopathy) or possibly not existent (nephropathy: RR 0.79 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.70); P = 0.55; 179 participants with microalbuminuria; 3 trials; very low quality evidence); no adequate data were available regarding the progression of neuropathy. For retinopathy, intensive glucose control reduced the risk of progression in studies with a follow-up duration of at least two years (85/366 (23.2%) versus 154/398 (38.7%); RR 0.61 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.76); P < 0.0001; 764 participants; 2 trials; moderate quality evidence), while we found evidence for an initial worsening of retinopathy after only one year of intensive glucose control (17/49 (34.7%) versus 7/47 (14.9%); RR 2.32 (95% CI 1.16 to 4.63); P = 0.02; 96 participants; 2 trials; low quality evidence).

Major macrovascular outcomes (stroke and myocardial infarction) occurred very rarely, and no firm evidence could be established regarding these outcome measures (low quality evidence).

We found that intensive glucose control increased the risk for severe hypoglycaemia, however the results were heterogeneous and only the 'Diabetes Complications Clinical Trial' (DCCT) showed a clear increase in severe hypoglycaemic episodes under intensive treatment. A subgroup analysis according to the baseline haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of participants in the trials (low quality evidence) suggests that the risk of hypoglycaemia is possibly only increased for patients who started with relatively low HbA1c values (< 9.0%). Several of the included studies also showed a greater weight gain under intensive glucose control, and the risk of ketoacidosis was only increased in studies using insulin pumps in the intensive treatment group (very low quality evidence).

Overall, all-cause mortality was very low in all studies (moderate quality evidence) except in one study investigating renal allograft as treatment for end-stage diabetic nephropathy. Health-related quality of life was only reported in the DCCT trial, showing no statistically significant differences between the intervention and comparator groups (moderate quality evidence). In addition, only the DCCT published data on costs, indicating that intensive glucose therapy control was highly cost-effective considering the reduction of potential diabetes complications (moderate quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

Tight blood sugar control reduces the risk of developing microvascular diabetes complications. The evidence of benefit is mainly from studies in younger patients at early stages of the disease. Benefits need to be weighed against risks including severe hypoglycaemia, and patient training is an important aspect in practice. The effects of tight blood sugar control seem to become weaker once complications have been manifested. However, further research is needed on this issue. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence from RCTs on the effects of tight blood sugar control in older patient populations or patients with macrovascular disease. There is no firm evidence for specific blood glucose targets and treatment goals need to be individualised taking into account age, disease progression, macrovascular risk, as well as the patient's lifestyle and disease management capabilities.

Résumé scientifique

Contrôle glycémique intensif versus contrôle glycémique classique pour le diabète de type 1

Contexte

Les recommandations cliniques diffèrent concernant les cibles glycémiques conseillées pour les patients atteints de diabète de type 1, et des études récentes sur des diabétiques de type 2 suggèrent que l'objectif de valeurs cibles très basses peut augmenter le risque de mortalité.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des cibles glycémiques intensives versus conventionnelles chez les patients atteints de diabète de type 1 en termes de complications à long terme et déterminer si des valeurs très basses proches de la normoglycémie apportent un bénéfice supplémentaire.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Une recherche bibliographique systématique a été effectuée dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane ainsi que dans les bases MEDLINE et EMBASE. La dernière recherche a été effectuée en décembre 2012 pour toutes ces bases de données.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ayant défini différentes cibles glycémiques dans les bras de traitement, portant sur des patients atteints de diabète de type 1 et avec une durée de suivi d'au moins un an.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais des études, les désaccords ayant été résolus par consensus. La qualité globale des études a été évaluée par le système GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation). Des modèles à effets aléatoires ont été utilisés pour les analyses principales et les résultats sont présentés sous forme de risques relatifs (RR) avec intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour les résultats dichotomiques.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons identifié 12 essais qui remplissaient les critères d'inclusion, portant sur un total de 2 230 patients. Les populations de patients variaient largement entre les études, avec une étude portant uniquement sur des enfants, une autre sur des patients ayant subi une transplantation rénale, une troisième sur des patients adultes nouvellement diagnostiqués, et plusieurs études où les patients présentaient une rétinopathie ou une microalbuminurie au départ. La durée moyenne de suivi variait entre les études de un à 6,5 ans. La majorité des études ont été effectuées dans les années 1980 et tous les essais étaient réalisés en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord. En raison de la nature de l'intervention, aucune de ces études n'a pu être effectuée à l'aveugle, de sorte que le risque de biais de performance, en particulier pour les critères de jugement subjectifs tels que l'hypoglycémie, était présent dans toutes les études. Cinquante pour cent des études ont été évaluées à risque élevé de biais dans au moins une autre catégorie.

Sous contrôle glycémique intensif, le risque de développement de complications microvasculaires a été réduit par rapport à un traitement conventionnel pour a) la rétinopathie : 23/371 (6,2 %) versus 92/397 (23,2 %) ; RR 0,27 (IC à 95 % 0,18 à 0,42) ; P < 0,00001 ; 768 participants ; 2 essais ; preuves de qualité élevée ; b) la néphropathie : 119/732 (16,3 %) versus 211/743 (28,4 %) ; RR 0,56 (IC à 95 % 0,46 à 0,68) ; P < 0,00001 ; 1 475 participants ; 3 essais ; preuves de qualité modérée ; c) la neuropathie : 29/586 (4,9 %) versus 86/617 (13,9 %) ; RR 0,35 (IC à 95 % 0,23 à 0,53) ; P < 0,00001 ; 1 203 participants ; 3 essais ; preuves de qualité élevée. Concernant la progression de ces complications après leur manifestation, l'effet était plus faible (rétinopathie) ou potentiellement inexistant (néphropathie : RR 0,79 (IC à 95 % 0,37 à 1,70) ; P = 0,55 ; 179 participants avec une microalbuminurie ; 3 essais ; preuves de très faible qualité) ; aucune donnée adéquate n'était disponible concernant la progression de la neuropathie. Pour la rétinopathie, un contrôle glycémique intensif réduisait le risque de progression dans les études avec une durée de suivi d'au moins deux ans (85/366 (23,2 %) versus 154/398 (38,7 %) ; RR 0,61 (IC à 95 % 0,49 à 0,76) ; P < 0,0001 ; 764 participants ; 2 essais ; preuves de qualité modérée), tandis que nous avons trouvé des preuves pour une aggravation initiale de la rétinopathie après seulement un an de contrôle glycémique intensif (17/49 (34,7 %) versus 7/47 (14,9 %) ; RR 2,32 (IC à 95 % 1,16 à 4,63) ; P = 0,02 ; 96 participants ; 2 essais ; preuves de faible qualité).

Des événements macrovasculaires majeurs (accident vasculaire cérébral et infarctus du myocarde) sont survenus très rarement, et aucune preuve solide n'a pu être établie concernant ces mesures de résultat (preuves de faible qualité).

Nous avons constaté qu'un contrôle glycémique intensif augmentait le risque d'hypoglycémie sévère, cependant les résultats étaient hétérogènes et seule l'étude Diabetes Complications Clinical Trial (DCCT) a montré une augmentation nette des épisodes d'hypoglycémie sévère sous traitement intensif. Une analyse en sous-groupes en fonction de l'hémoglobine A1c (HbA1c) des participants au départ des essais (preuves de faible qualité) suggère que le risque d'hypoglycémie est potentiellement augmenté seulement pour les patients commençant avec des valeurs relativement basses d'HbA1c (< 9,0 %). Plusieurs des études incluses ont également montré une prise de poids supérieure sous contrôle glycémique intensif, et le risque d'acidocétose n'était augmenté que dans les études utilisant des pompes à insuline dans le groupe de traitement intensif (preuves de très faible qualité).

Dans l'ensemble, la mortalité toutes causes confondues était très faible dans toutes les études (preuves de qualité modérée), sauf dans une étude examinant l'allogreffe rénale en tant que traitement pour la néphropathie diabétique terminale. La qualité de vie liée à la santé n'était rapportée que dans l'essai DCCT, qui ne montrait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes d'intervention et de comparaison (preuves de qualité modérée). En outre, seul l'essai DCCT a publié des données sur les coûts, indiquant que le traitement de contrôle glycémique intensif était très rentable compte tenu de la réduction des complications potentielles du diabète (preuves de qualité modérée).

Conclusions des auteurs

Un contrôle strict de la glycémie réduit le risque de développer des complications microvasculaires du diabète. Les preuves du bénéfice sont principalement issues d'études chez les patients les plus jeunes au stade précoce de la maladie. Les effets bénéfiques doivent être mis en balance avec les risques, notamment l'hypoglycémie sévère, et l'éducation des patients est un aspect important dans la pratique. Les effets du contrôle glycémique strict semblent s'affaiblir après des complications ont été manifestées. Cependant, des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires sur cette question. En outre, il existe un manque de preuves issues d'ECR sur les effets d'un contrôle de la glycémie chez des populations de patients plus âgés ou chez les patients atteints de maladies macrovasculaires. Il n'existe aucune preuve solide pour des cibles glycémiques spécifiques et les objectifs de traitement doivent être individualisés en tenant compte de l'âge, de la progression de la maladie, du risque macrovasculaire, ainsi que le mode de vie du patient et les capacités de prise en charge de la maladie.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Cochrane France

Resumo

Controle glicêmico intensivo versus controle glicêmico convencional para diabetes mellitus tipo 1

Introdução

As diretrizes clínicas diferem em relação às metas glicêmicas recomendadas para pacientes com diabetes tipo 1. Estudos recentes em pacientes com diabetes tipo 2 sugerem que metas glicêmicas muito baixas podem aumentar o risco de mortalidade.

Objetivos

Avaliar os efeitos do controle glicêmico intensivo versus o convencional em pacientes com diabetes tipo 1, em termos de complicações a longo prazo. Avaliar se valores glicêmicos muito baixos, próximos à normalidade, trazem benefícios adicionais.

Métodos de busca

Fizemos buscas nas seguintes bases de dados eletrônicas: Biblioteca Cochrane, MEDLINE e Embase. A busca foi realizada em dezembro de 2012.

Critério de seleção

Incluímos todos os ensaios clínicos randomizados (ECR) que testaram diferentes metas de controle glicêmico em pacientes com diabetes tipo 1 e que tinham acompanhamento de pelo menos um ano.

Coleta dos dados e análises

Dois revisores extraíram os dados e avaliaram o risco de viés dos estudos, de forma independente. As divergências foram resolvidas por consenso. A qualidade geral das evidências foi avaliada pelo sistema GRADE. Fizemos metanálises usando os modelos de efeitos aleatórios. Apresentamos os resultados dos desfechos dicotômicos como risco relativo (RR), com intervalos de confiança de 95% (95% CI).

Principais resultados

Identificamos 12 ECRs (2.230 pacientes) que preencheram nossos critérios de seleção. As características dos pacientes variaram muito entre os estudos. Um estudo incluiu apenas crianças, outro incluiu apenas pacientes com transplante renal, um incluiu apenas adultos recém-diagnosticados com DM1 e diversos estudos incluíram pacientes com retinopatia ou microalbuminúria instalada. A duração média de acompanhamento dos pacientes nos diversos estudos variou entre 1 ano e 6,5 anos. A maioria dos estudos foi realizada na década de 1980, e todos ocorreram na Europa ou na América do Norte. Todos os estudos tiveram um alto risco de viés de desempenho (performance bias) para desfechos subjetivos (como hipoglicemia), já que não foi possível cegar os participantes quanto à intervenção. Metade dos estudos foi classificada como tendo alto risco de viés em pelo menos um dos outros domínios.

O controle glicêmico intensivo, em comparação com o tratamento convencional, reduziu o risco de complicações microvascularesa) retinopatia: 23/371 (6,2%) versus 92/397 (23,2%); RR 0,27 (95% CI 0,18 a 0,42); P < 0,00001; 768 participantes; 2 estudos; evidência de alta qualidade; b) nefropatia: 119/732 (16,3%) contra 211/743 (28,4%); RR 0,56 (95% CI 0,46 a 0,68); P < 0,00001; 1.475 participantes; 3 estudos; evidência de moderada qualidade; c) neuropatia: 29/586 (4,9%) contra 86/617 (13,9%); RR 0,35 (95% CI 0,23 a 0,53); P < 0,00001; 1.203 participantes; 3 estudos; evidência de alta qualidade O efeito sobre a progressão dessas complicações foi menor (retinopatia) ou possivelmente inexistente (nefropatia: RR 0,79; 95% CI 0,37 a 1,70); P = 0,55; 179 participantes com microalbuminúria; 3 estudos; evidência de qualidade muito baixa). Não há dados disponíveis em relação à progressão da neuropatia; O controle glicêmico intensivo reduziu o risco de progressão de retinopatia nos estudos com acompanhamento de pelo menos dois anos: 85/366 (23,2%) versus 154/398 (38,7%); (RR 0,61; 95% CI 0,49 a 0,76; P < 0,0001; 764 participantes; 2 estudos; evidência de qualidade moderada). Houve evidência de que inicialmente o controle glicêmico intensivo piorou a retinopatia após um ano de tratamento: 17/49 (34,7%) versus 7/47 (14,9%); RR 2,32 (95% CI 1,16 a 4.63); P = 0,02; 96 participantes; 2 estudos; evidência de baixa qualidade.

Desfechos macrovasculares maiores (acidente vascular cerebral e infarto do miocárdio) ocorreram muito raramente; portanto, não foi possível avaliar o efeito da intervenção sobre esses desfechos (evidência de baixa qualidade).

O controle glicêmico intensivo aumentou o risco de hipoglicemia grave. Porém os resultados foram heterogêneos, e apenas um estudo (o 'Diabetes Complications Clinical Trial', DCCT) mostrou aumento evidente no número de episódios de hipoglicemia grave no grupo sob tratamento intensivo. Uma análise de subgrupo, de acordo com o nível inicial de hemoglobina glicada (HbA1c) dos participantes, sugere que o risco de hipoglicemia seria maior apenas nos pacientes com níveis relativamente baixos de HbA1c (< 9,0%; evidência de baixa qualidade). Vários dos estudos incluídos mostraram também maior ganho de peso no grupo dos participantes tratados com controle glicêmico intensivo, e o risco de cetoacidose foi maior apenas nos estudos que utilizaram bombas de insulina no grupo de tratamento intensivo (qualidade de evidência muito baixa).

Em geral, a mortalidade por qualquer causa foi muito baixa em todos os estudos (evidência de moderada qualidade), exceto em um estudo que avaliou aloenxerto renal como tratamento para nefropatia diabética em fase final. A qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde foi relatada apenas no estudo DCCT; não houve diferença significativa nesse desfecho entre os grupos de intervenção e comparador (evidência de qualidade moderada). Além disso, somente o estudo DCCT apresentou dados sobre custos, indicando que o tratamento glicêmico intensivo era altamente custo-efetivo, considerando a redução das possíveis complicações do diabetes (evidência de qualidade moderada).

Conclusão dos autores

O controle glicêmico rigoroso reduz o risco de desenvolver complicações microvasculares do diabetes. A evidência desse benefício é baseada principalmente em estudos envolvendo pacientes mais jovens em estágios iniciais da doença. Os benefícios precisam ser pesados contra os riscos, tais como a hipoglicemia grave; o treinamento do paciente é um aspecto importante na prática. Os efeitos do controle glicêmico rigoroso parecem tornar-se menos evidentes nos pacientes que já têm complicações. No entanto, ainda são necessários mais estudos sobre e esta questão. Além disso, há uma falta de evidência de ECRs sobre os efeitos de controle glicêmico rigoroso em pacientes mais velhos ou com doença macrovascular. Não há evidência forte sobre quais seriam as metas glicêmicas ideais para todos os pacientes. As metas precisam ser individualizadas, levando-se em conta a idade, o estágio da doença, o risco macrovascular, o estilo de vida do paciente e sua capacidade de controlar o diabetes.

Notas de tradução

Tradução do Centro Cochrane do Brasil (Arnaldo Alves da Silva)

Plain language summary

Intensive glucose control versus conventional glucose control for type 1 diabetes mellitus

Review question

The primary objective of this review was to assess the positive and negative outcomes of tighter blood glucose control ('intensive' glucose control) compared to less intense treatment targets ('conventional' glucose control) in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

Background

Treatment of type 1 diabetes consists of life-long blood sugar control through insulin replacement. It is generally agreed that achieving 'good' blood sugar control while avoiding episodes of very low blood sugars (severe hypoglycaemia) should be the primary treatment goal for individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, clinical guidelines differ regarding their recommended blood glucose targets.

Study characteristics

We identified 12 relevant studies, which included a total of 2230 participants. The participant populations varied widely across studies regarding age, disease duration, and existing diabetes complications. The mean follow-up duration across studies varied between one and 6.5 years. The majority of the studies were carried out in the 1980s and all studies took place in Europe or North America.

Key results

We found that intensive glucose control was highly effective in reducing the risk of developing microvascular diabetes complications, such as retinopathy (eye disease), nephropathy kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve disease). For developing retinopathy, 63 per 1000 people with intensive glucose control compared to 232 per 1000 people with conventional glucose control experienced this diabetes complication. For developing nephropathy, 159 per 1000 people with intensive glucose control compared to 284 per 1000 people with conventional glucose control experienced this diabetes complication. For developing neuropathy, 49 per 1000 people with intensive glucose control compared to 139 per 1000 people with conventional glucose control experienced this diabetes complication.

A weaker effect was found on the progression of retinopathy, while we could not find clear evidence of benefit of tight blood sugar control on the progression of nephropathy once participants had developed microalbuminuria (the kidney leaking small amounts of the protein albumin into the urine); no adequate data were available regarding the progression of neuropathy.

Major macrovascular outcomes (such as stroke and myocardial infarction) occurred very rarely; therefore we could not draw firm conclusions from the studies included in this review.

We found that intensive glucose control can increase the risk of severe hypoglycaemia, however the results varied across studies and only one big study showed a clear increase in severe hypoglycaemic episodes under intensive treatment. An analysis according to haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (a long-term measure of glucose control) at the start of the study suggests that the risk of hypoglycaemia with intensive glucose control is possibly only increased for people who started the study with relatively low HbA1c values (less than 9.0%).

There were very few data on health-related quality of life, death from any cause, and costs. Overall, mortality was very low in almost all studies. The effects of intensive glucose control on health-related quality of life were unclear and were consistent with benefit or harm. One study reported that intensive glucose control could be highly cost-effective when considering the potential reduction of diabetes complications in the future.

Tight blood sugar control reduced the risk of developing microvascular diabetes complications. The main benefits identified in this review came from studies in younger individuals who were at early stages of the disease. Appropriate patient training is important with these interventions in order to avoid the risk of severe hypoglycaemia. The effects of tight blood sugar control seem to become weaker once complications occur. However, further research is needed on this issue. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence from randomised controlled trials on the effects of tight blood sugar control on older patient populations or individuals with macrovascular disease. There is currently no firm evidence for specific blood glucose targets, therefore treatment goals need to be individualised, taking into account age, disease progression, macrovascular risk, as well as people's lifestyle and disease management capabilities.

Quality of the evidence

For the majority of outcomes we evaluated the overall quality of evidence as moderate or low (analysed by the 'Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation' (GRADE) system).

Currentness of data

This evidence is up to date as of December 2012.

Résumé simplifié

Contrôle glycémique intensif versus contrôle glycémique classique pour le diabète de type 1

Question de la revue

L'objectif principal de cette revue était d'évaluer les résultats positifs et négatifs d'un contrôle plus strict du taux de glucose sanguin (contrôle glycémique intensif) par rapport à des objectifs de traitement moins rigoureux (contrôle glycémique classique) chez les individus atteints de diabète de type 1.

Contexte

Le traitement du diabète de type 1 consiste en un contrôle à vie du taux de glucose sanguin à travers la substitution d'insuline. Il est généralement admis que l'obtention d'un "bon" contrôle de la glycémie tout en évitant les épisodes de glucose sanguin très bas (hypoglycémie sévère) devrait être le principal objectif de traitement pour les individus atteints de diabète de type 1. Cependant, les recommandations cliniques diffèrent sur les valeurs cibles du glucose sanguin conseillées.

Caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons identifié 12 études pertinentes portant sur un total de 2 230 participants. Les populations de participants variaient largement entre les études en termes d'âge, de durée de la maladie et des complications existantes du diabète. La durée moyenne de suivi variait entre les études de un à 6,5 ans. La majorité des études ont été effectuées dans les années 1980 et toutes ont été réalisées en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons constaté qu'un contrôle glycémique intensif était très efficace pour réduire le risque de développer des complications microvasculaires du diabète, telles que la rétinopathie (maladie des yeux), la néphropathie (maladie des reins) et la neuropathie (maladie des nerfs). Pour la rétinopathie, 63 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique intensif ont développé cette complication, contre 232 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique classique. Pour la néphropathie, 159 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique intensif ont développé cette complication, contre 284 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique classique. Enfin, pour la neuropathie, 49 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique intensif ont développé cette complication, contre 139 pour 1 000 personnes avec un contrôle glycémique classique.

Un effet plus faible a été observé sur la progression de la rétinopathie, tandis que nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuve claire d'un effet bénéfique d'un contrôle strict de la glycémie sur la progression de la néphropathie une fois que les participants avaient développé une microalbuminurie (le rein laisse passer de petites quantités de la protéine albumine dans l'urine) ; aucune donnée adéquate n'était disponible concernant la progression de la neuropathie.

Des événements macrovasculaires majeurs (comme l'accident vasculaire cérébral et l'infarctus du myocarde) sont survenus très rarement ; par conséquent, nous n'avons pas pu tirer de conclusions définitives d'après les études incluses dans cette revue.

Nous avons constaté qu'un contrôle glycémique intensif pouvait augmenter le risque d'hypoglycémie sévère, cependant les résultats variaient entre les études et seulement une grande étude a montré une augmentation nette des épisodes d'hypoglycémie sévère sous traitement intensif. Une analyse des niveaux d'hémoglobine A1c (HbA1c) (mesure à long terme du contrôle glycémique) au début de l'étude suggère que le risque d'hypoglycémie avec un contrôle glycémique intensif est possiblement augmenté seulement chez les personnes ayant commencé l'étude avec des valeurs relativement faibles d'HbA1c (moins de 9,0 %).

Très peu de données étaient disponibles sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé, les décès toutes causes confondues et les coûts. Dans l'ensemble, la mortalité était très faible dans presque toutes les études. Les effets d'un contrôle glycémique intensif sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé n'étaient pas clairs et étaient cohérents avec un bénéfice ou un préjudice. Une étude rapportait qu'un contrôle glycémique intensif pouvait être très rentable lorsque l'on considère le potentiel de réduction des complications du diabète dans l'avenir.

Un contrôle strict de la glycémie a réduit le risque de développer des complications microvasculaires du diabète. Les principaux avantages identifiés dans cette revue provenaient d'études sur des personnes plutôt jeunes au stade précoce de la maladie. Une éducation appropriée des patients est nécessaire avec de telles interventions afin d'éviter le risque d'hypoglycémie sévère. Les effets d'un contrôle glycémique strict semblent s'affaiblir après la survenue de complications. Cependant, des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires sur cette question. En outre, il existe un manque de preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés sur les effets d'un contrôle glycémique strict sur des populations de patients plus âgés ou chez les personnes atteintes de maladies macrovasculaires. Il n'existe actuellement aucune preuve solide sur des cibles glycémiques spécifiques, par conséquent les objectifs de traitement doivent être individualisés, en tenant compte de l'âge, de la progression de la maladie, du risque macrovasculaire ainsi que du mode de vie de la personne et de ses capacités de prise en charge de la maladie.

Qualité des preuves

Pour la majorité des critères de jugement, nous avons évalué la qualité globale des preuves comme étant moyenne ou faible (analyse par le système GRADE - Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation).

Actualité des données

Ces preuves sont à jour jusqu'à décembre 2012.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Cochrane France

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Strenge versus herkömmliche Blutzuckerkontrolle bei Typ-1-Diabetes mellitus

Fragestellung

Das primäre Ziel dieses Reviews war es, die positiven und negativen Endpunkte der strengen Blutzuckerkontrolle im Vergleich zu weniger strengen Behandlungszielen (herkömmliche Zuckerkontrolle) bei Patienten mit Typ-1-Diabetes zu bewerten.

Hintergrund

Behandlung von Typ-1-Diabetes besteht aus lebenslanger Blutzuckerkontrolle durch Insulin-Ersatz. Es ist allgemein anerkannt, dass eine "gute" Blutzuckerkontrolle unter Vermeidung von Episoden mit sehr niedrigem Blutzucker (schwere Hypoglykämie) das primäre Behandlungsziel für Menschen mit Typ-1-Diabetes sein sollte. Allerdings unterscheiden sich klinische Leitlinien in Bezug auf die empfohlenen Zielwerte des Blutzuckers.

Studienmerkmale

Wir identifizierten 12 relevante Studien mit insgesamt 2230 Teilnehmern. Die Teilnehmer unterschieden sich zwischen den Studien stark in Bezug auf Alter, Krankheitsdauer und bestehende Diabetes-Komplikationen. Die mittlere Dauer der Nachbeobachtung in den Studien variierte zwischen einem und 6,5 Jahren. Die meisten Studien wurden in den 1980er Jahren durchgeführt und alle Studien fanden in Europa oder Nordamerika statt.

Hauptergebnisse

Wir fanden, dass intensive Blutzuckerkontrolle sehr wirksam war, um das Risiko der Entwicklung mikrovaskulärer Diabetes-Komplikationen, wie Retinopathie (Augenerkrankung), Nephropathie (Nierenerkrankung) und Neuropathie (Nervenerkrankung) zu verringern. Bezüglich der Entwicklung von Retinopathie, erlebten 63 von 1000 Patienten mit intensiver Blutzuckerkontrolle im Vergleich zu 232 pro 1000 Patienten mit herkömmlicher Zuckerkontrolle diese Diabetes-Komplikation. 159 pro 1000 Patienten mit intensiver Blutzuckerkontrolle im Vergleich zu 284 pro 1000 Patienten mit herkömmlicher Blutzuckerkontrolle erlebten eine weitere Diabetes-Komplikation: die Entwicklung von Nephropathie. 49 pro 1000 Patienten mit intensiver Blutzuckerkontrolle im Vergleich zu 139 pro 1000 Patienten mit herkömmlicher Zuckerkontrolle entwickelten eine Neurophathie.

Auf die Progression der Retinopathie wurde ein schwächerer Effekt gefunden, während wir keine eindeutige Evidenz für den Nutzen der strengen Blutzuckerkontrolle auf die Progression der Nephropathie finden konnten, sobald die Teilnehmer eine Mikroalbuminurie (geringe Mengen des Proteins Albumin werden mit dem Urin ausgeschieden) entwickelt hatten; über die Progression von Neuropathie standen keine ausreichenden Daten zur Verfügung.

Schwere makrovaskuläre Endpunkte (wie Schlaganfall und Myokardinfarkt) traten sehr selten auf; daher konnten wir keine gesicherten Schlüsse aus den eingeschlossenen Studien ziehen.

Wir haben festgestellt, dass die strenge Blutzuckerkontrolle das Risiko einer schweren Hypoglykämie steigern kann. Jedoch variierten die Ergebnisse zwischen den Studien und nur eine große Studie zeigte einen deutlichen Anstieg der schweren Hypoglykämien unter strenger Behandlungskontrolle. Eine Analyse von Hämoglobin A1c (HbA1c)-Werten (eine langfristige Maßnahme zur Blutzuckerkontrolle) zu Beginn der Studie legt nahe, dass das Risiko einer Hypoglykämie mit intensiver Blutzuckerkontrolle möglicherweise nur für Menschen erhöht war, die die Studie mit relativ niedrigen HbA1c-Werten (weniger als 9,0%) begannen.

Es gab sehr wenige Daten über die gesundheitsbezogene Lebensqualität, Tod jeglicher Ursache und Kosten. Insgesamt war die Sterblichkeit in fast allen Studien sehr gering. Die Wirkungen der strengen Blutzuckerkontrolle auf die gesundheitsbezogene Lebensqualität waren unklar und zeigten sowohl möglichen Nutzen als auch Schaden. Eine Studie berichtet, dass intensive Blutzuckerkontrolle sehr kostengünstig sein kann, wenn man die mögliche Verringerung der zukünftigen Diabetes-Komplikationen berücksichtigt.

Strenge Blutzuckerkontrolle verringerte das Risiko der Entwicklung mikrovaskulärer Diabetes-Komplikationen. Die größten, in diesem Review identifizierten Vorteile kamen aus Studien mit jüngeren Teilnehmern, die in frühen Stadien der Erkrankung waren. Entsprechende Patientenschulungen sind bei diesen Interventionen wichtig, um das Risiko einer schweren Hypoglykämie zu vermeiden. Die Wirkungen der strengen Blutzuckerkontrolle scheinen schwächer zu werden, sobald Komplikationen auftreten. Jedoch ist weitere Forschung zu diesem Problem notwendig. Darüber hinaus gibt es einen Mangel an Evidenz aus randomisierten kontrollierten Studien über die Wirkungen der strengen Blutzuckerkontrolle bei älteren Patientengruppen oder Personen mit makrovaskulären Erkrankungen. Derzeit gibt es keine überzeugende Evidenz für bestimmte Zielwerte des Blutzuckers, daher müssen Behandlungsziele unter Berücksichtigung des Alters, des Krankheitsfortschritts, des makrovaskulären Risikos, sowie der Lebensführung und den Fähigkeiten des Krankheits-Managements der Patienten individualisiert werden.

Qualität der Evidenz

Für die Mehrheit der Endpunkte bewerteten wir die Gesamtqualität der Evidenz als moderat oder niedrig (analysiert mit dem "Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation" (GRADE) System).

Aktualität der Daten

Diese Evidenz ist auf dem Stand von Dezember 2012.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

I. Töws und K. Kunzweiler, freigegeben durch Cochrane Deutschland.

Resumo para leigos

Controle glicêmico intensivo versus controle glicêmico convencional para pessoas com diabetes tipo 1

Pergunta da revisão

O objetivo principal desta revisão foi avaliar, em pessoas com diabetes tipo 1, os efeitos positivos e negativos do controle mais rigoroso do nível de açúcar no sangue (controle glicêmico “intensivo”) em comparação com o controle menos rigoroso (controle glicêmico)

Introdução

O tratamento das pessoas com diabetes tipo 1 consiste em tomar insulina para controlar o nível de açúcar no sangue, por toda a vida. O objetivo principal do tratamento dessas pessoas é conseguir um “bom” controle do nível de açúcar no sangue e, ao mesmo tempo, evitar que elas tenham episódios de açúcar muito baixo no sangue (hipoglicemia grave). No entanto, diretrizes clínicas diferem em relação às metas glicêmicas (valores ideais de glicose no sangue) recomendadas para as pessoas que têm diabetes tipo 1.

Características do estudo

Encontramos 12 estudos relevantes, que incluíram um total de 2.230 participantes. Os participantes desses estudos variaram muito quanto a idade, a duração do diabetes e também quanto a já ter ou não complicações da doença quando eles foram incluídos nos estudos. A duração média do seguimento dos participantes variou entre 1 ano e 6,5 anos. A maioria dos estudos foi realizada na década de 1980 e todos os participantes moravam na Europa ou na América do Norte.

Resultados principais

O controle glicêmico intensivo foi muito efetivo na redução do risco de desenvolver complicações microvasculares do diabetes, como retinopatia (doença ocular), nefropatia (doença renal) e neuropatia (doença dos nervos). Enquanto 63/1.000 pessoas no grupo do controle glicêmico intensivo desenvolveram retinopatia diabética, 232/1.000 pessoas no grupo de controle convencional apresentaram esta complicação. Enquanto 159/1.000 pessoas com controle glicêmico intensivo desenvolveram nefropatia diabética 284/1.000 pessoas no grupo de controle convencional apresentaram esta complicação. Enquanto 49/1.000 pessoas no grupo com controle glicêmico intensivo desenvolveram neuropatia, isso ocorreu em 139/1.000 pessoas no grupo com controle convencional.

O controle glicêmico intensivo teve um efeito mais fraco na progressão da retinopatia e não encontramos evidência de que esse tipo de controle tenha qualquer efeito sobre a progressão da nefropatia nos participantes que já têm microalbuminúria (perda de albumina pelo rim). Não existem dados sobre o efeito do controle glicêmico rigoroso sobre a progressão da neuropatia.

Desfechos macrovasculares maiores (tais como derrame e infarto) foram muito raros nos estudos incluídos nesta revisão. Por isso, não conseguimos chegar a conclusões definitivas sobre o efeito do controle glicêmico rigoroso sobre esses problemas de saúde.

O controle glicêmico intensivo pode aumentar o risco de hipoglicemia grave, porém os resultados variaram entre os estudos, e apenas um grande estudo mostrou um claro aumento nos episódios de hipoglicemia grave nos pacientes sob controle intensivo. Fizemos uma análise de acordo com níveis de hemoglobina glicada (HbA1c; um indicador do do controle glicêmico a longo prazo) dos participantes no início do estudo. Essa análise sugere que o risco de hipoglicemia grave com controle intensivo da glicose possivelmente só estava aumentado para quem começou o estudo com valores de HbA1c relativamente baixos (inferior a 9,0%).

Quase não havia dados sobre qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde, morte por qualquer causa e custos. Em geral, a mortalidade foi muito baixa em quase todos os estudos. Os efeitos do controle glicêmico intensivo na qualidade de vida não ficaram claros e foram inconsistentes (tanto poderia melhorar ou piorar a qualidade de vida). Um estudo relatou que o controle glicêmico intensivo pode ser altamente interessante do ponto de vista financeiro porque pode reduzir as complicações do diabetes no futuro.

O controle glicêmico rigoroso reduziu o risco de desenvolver complicações microvasculares do diabetes. Os principais benefícios identificados nesta revisão vieram de estudos com pessoas mais jovens que estavam em estágios iniciais da doença. O treinamento adequado do paciente é importante nesse tipo de controle para evitar o risco de hipoglicemia grave. Para os pacientes que já têm complicações, os benefícios do controle glicêmico rigoroso parecem ser menores. No entanto, essa é uma questão que ainda precisa de mais estudos. Além disso, há uma falta de evidências de ensaios clínicos controlados sobre os efeitos de controle glicêmico rigoroso nas pessoas mais velhas ou naquelas que já têm doença macrovascular. Não há, atualmente, nenhuma evidência forte que aponte quais seriam os níveis ideais de glicemia para os pacientes com diabetes tipo 1. Portanto, as metas glicêmicas devem ser individualizadas, levando em conta a idade, o estágio da doença, o risco macrovascular, o estilo de vida e a capacidade de cada paciente controlar a sua doença.

Qualidade da evidência

Para a maioria dos desfechos, a a evidência foi considerada como sendo de qualidade moderada ou baixa (analisada de acordo com o GRADE).

Atualização dos dados

Esta evidência foi atualizada em dezembro de 2012.

Notas de tradução

Tradução do Centro Cochrane do Brasil (Arnaldo Alves da Silva)

Ancillary