Intervention Review

Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles

  1. Michelle van der Linden1,*,
  2. Karen Buckingham2,
  3. Cindy Farquhar3,
  4. Jan AM Kremer4,
  5. Mostafa Metwally5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group

Published Online: 5 OCT 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009154.pub2


How to Cite

van der Linden M, Buckingham K, Farquhar C, Kremer JAM, Metwally M. Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD009154. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009154.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Radboud University Nijmegen, Faculty of Medical School, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Auckland DHB, New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand

  3. 3

    University of Auckland, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Auckland, New Zealand

  4. 4

    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  5. 5

    Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, The Jessop Wing and Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK

*Michelle van der Linden, Faculty of Medical School, Radboud University Nijmegen, Geert Grooteplein 9, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen, 6500HB, Netherlands. vdlinden.michelle@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 5 OCT 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Progesterone prepares the endometrium for pregnancy by stimulating proliferation in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is produced by the corpus luteum. This occurs in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In assisted reproduction techniques (ART) the progesterone or hCG levels, or both, are low and the natural process is insufficient, so the luteal phase is supported with either progesterone, hCG or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. Luteal phase support improves implantation rate and thus pregnancy rates but the ideal method is still unclear. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2004 (Daya 2004).

Objectives

To determine the relative effectiveness and safety of methods of luteal phase support in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproductive technology.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), LILACS, conference abstracts on the ISI Web of Knowledge, OpenSigle for grey literature from Europe, and ongoing clinical trials registered online. The final search was in February 2011.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of luteal phase support in ART investigating progesterone, hCG or GnRH agonist supplementation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. Quasi-randomised trials and trials using frozen transfers or donor oocyte cycles were excluded.

Data collection and analysis

We extracted data per women and three review authors independently assessed risk of bias. We contacted the original authors when data were missing or the risk of bias was unclear. We entered all data in six different comparisons. We calculated the Peto odds ratio (Peto OR) for each comparison.

Main results

Sixty-nine studies with a total of 16,327 women were included. We assessed most of the studies as having an unclear risk of bias, which we interpreted as a high risk of bias. Because of the great number of different comparisons, the average number of included studies in a single comparison was only 1.5 for live birth and 6.1 for clinical pregnancy.

Five studies (746 women) compared hCG versus placebo or no treatment. There was no evidence of a difference between hCG and placebo or no treatment except for ongoing pregnancy: Peto OR 1.75 (95% CI 1.09 to 2.81), suggesting a benefit from hCG. There was a significantly higher risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) when hCG was used (Peto OR 3.62, 95% CI 1.85 to 7.06).

There were eight studies (875 women) in the second comparison, progesterone versus placebo or no treatment. The results suggested a significant effect in favour of progesterone for the live birth rate (Peto OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.02 to 8.56) based on one study. For clinical pregnancy (CPR) the results also suggested a significant result in favour of progesterone (Peto OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.61) based on seven studies. For the other outcomes the results indicated no difference in effect.

The third comparison (15 studies, 2117 women) investigated progesterone versus hCG regimens. The hCG regimens were subgrouped into comparisons of progesterone versus hCG and progesterone versus progesterone + hCG. The results did not indicate a difference of effect between the interventions, except for OHSS. Subgroup analysis of progesterone versus progesterone + hCG showed a significant benefit from progesterone (Peto OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.79).

The fourth comparison (nine studies, 1571 women) compared progesterone versus progesterone + oestrogen. Outcomes were subgrouped by route of administration. The results for clinical pregnancy rate in the subgroup progesterone versus progesterone + transdermal oestrogen suggested a significant benefit from progesterone + oestrogen. There was no evidence of a difference in effect for other outcomes.

Six studies (1646 women) investigated progesterone versus progesterone + GnRH agonist. We subgrouped the studies for single-dose GnRH agonist and multiple-dose GnRH agonist. For live birth, clinical pregnancy and ongoing pregnancy rate the results suggested a benefit from progesterone + GnRH agonist, with significantly lower rates in the progesterone group. The Peto OR for the live birth rate was 0.40 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.61), for the clinical pregnancy rate was 0.74 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.90) and for the ongoing pregnancy rate was 0.76 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.97). The results for miscarriage and multiple pregnancy did not indicate a difference of effect.

The last comparison (32 studies, 9839 women) investigated different progesterone regimens:intramuscular (IM) versus oral administration, IM versus vaginal or rectal administration, vaginal or rectal versus oral administration, low-dose vaginal versus high-dose vaginal progesterone administration, short protocol versus long protocol and micronized progesterone versus synthetic progesterone. The main results of this comparison did not indicate a difference of effect except in some subgroup analyses. For the outcome clinical pregnancy, subgroup analysis of micronized progesterone versus synthetic progesterone showed a benefit from synthetic progesterone, with a significantly lower rate in the micronized progesterone group (Peto OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.96). For the outcome multiple pregnancy, the subgroup analysis of IM progesterone versus oral progesterone suggested a benefit from oral progesterone, with a significantly higher rate in the IM progesterone group (Peto OR 4.39, 95% CI 1.28 to 15.01).

Authors' conclusions

This review showed a significant effect in favour of progesterone for luteal phase support, favouring synthetic progesterone over micronized progesterone. Overall, the addition of other substances such as estrogen or hCG did not seem to improve outcomes. We also found no evidence favouring a specific route or duration of administration of progesterone. We found that hCG, or hCG plus progesterone, was associated with a higher risk of OHSS. The use of hCG should therefore be avoided. There were significant results showing a benefit from addition of GnRH agonist to progesterone for the outcomes of live birth, clinical pregnancy and ongoing pregnancy. For now, progesterone seems to be the best option as luteal phase support, with better pregnancy results when synthetic progesterone is used.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction

A woman's menstrual cycle consists of different phases. After ovulation the luteal phase starts and lasts until the next menstruation. It is named after the corpus luteum, the yellow body. This consists of the remnants of the ovulated egg in the ovary and produces different hormones, including progesterone. Progesterone stimulates proliferation of the lining of the uterus, preparing for implantation.

When in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), are used for subfertility treatment, fertilisation takes place outside the human body. It is standard protocol to obtain as many eggs as possible. The woman's pituitary gland is desensitised, making it possible to stimulate the ovaries. This process is called controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. In this way more mature eggs are produced, increasing the chance of successful fertilisation. This hyperstimulation causes a luteal phase defect, meaning that the multiple yellow bodies are unable to produce sufficient progesterone.

As a low progesterone level may lower the chance of implantation, the luteal phase needs to be supported. This may involve oral, vaginal or intramuscular progesterone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (which stimulates progesterone production) or gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. GnRH agonists stimulate the production of GnRH, a hormone responsible for follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) which triggers ovulation and develops the yellow body. GnRH agonists are thought to restore LH levels and support the luteal phase naturally.

Many different interventions, dosages and administration routes of luteal phase support have been investigated. We made six different comparisons, with an average of six studies for each comparison. We found six statistically significant results. Progesterone was more effective than placebo for live birth and clinical pregnancy. There are two different forms of progesterone, micronized (natural) and synthetic. When we compared these the results favoured synthetic progesterone. When we compared progesterone with progesterone + a single dose of GnRH agonist, the results favoured GnRH agonist supplementation for live birth and clinical pregnancy. In the comparison of progesterone with progesterone + multiple-dose GnRH agonist the results again favoured GnRH agonist supplementation. We also found that the use of hCG was linked to a significantly higher risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a side effect.

Because the number of studies in each comparison was small, we cannot be too certain about the results. This uncertainty is enhanced by the unclear methodology and high risk of bias of most included studies.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Soutien de la phase lutéale dans les cycles de procréation assistée

Contexte

La progestérone prépare l'endomètre pour la grossesse en stimulant la prolifération en réponse à la gonadotrophine chorionique humaine (hCG) qui est produite par le corps jaune. Cela se produit dans la phase lutéale du cycle menstruel. Dans les techniques de procréation assistée (TPA) les taux de progestérone ou d'hCG, ou les deux, sont faibles et le processus naturel est insuffisant ; la phase lutéale est donc soutenue avec de la progestérone, de l'hCG ou des agonistes de la gonadolibérine (GnRH). Le soutien de la phase lutéale améliore le taux d'implantation et donc le taux de grossesse, mais la méthode idéale n'est pas encore claire. Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane publiée en 2004 (Daya 2004).

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité relative et la sécurité des méthodes de soutien de la phase lutéale chez les femmes hypofertiles engagées dans un processus de procréation assistée.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les troubles menstruels et l'hypofertilité, dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) et dans MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, la base des résumés des revues systématiques hors Cochrane (DARE), LILACS ainsi que dans des résumés de congrès sur l'ISI Web of Knowledge, OpenSIGLE pour la littérature grise en provenance d'Europe, et dans les essais cliniques en cours, enregistrés, accessibles en ligne. La dernière recherche a été effectuée en février 2011.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur le soutien de la phase lutéale en TPA et évaluant la supplémentation en progestérone, hCG ou agoniste de la GnRH, dans les cycles de fécondation in vitro (FIV) ou d'injection intracytoplasmique de spermatozoïdes (IICS). Les essais quasi-randomisés et les essais sur des cycles utilisant des transferts congelés ou des ovocytes de donneurs ont été exclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons extrait les données sur les femmes et trois auteurs de la revue ont évalué de manière indépendante les risques de biais. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des articles originaux lorsque des données manquaient ou que le risque de biais n'était pas clair. Nous avons introduit toutes les données dans six comparaisons différentes. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif approché de Peto (Peto OR) pour chaque comparaison.

Résultats Principaux

Soixante-neuf études, portant sur un total de 16 327 femmes, ont été incluses. Pour la plupart des études, d'après notre évaluation, le risque de biais n'était pas clair et nous l'avons donc considéré comme un risque de biais élevé. En raison du grand nombre de comparaisons différentes, le nombre moyen d'études incluses par comparaison n'était que de 1,5 pour les naissances vivantes et de 6,1 pour les grossesses cliniques.

Cinq études (746 femmes) comparaient l'hCG à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement. Il n'y avait aucune différence entre l'hCG et le placebo ou l'absence de traitement, sauf pour les grossesses en cours : Peto OR 1,75 (IC 95% 1,09 à 2,81), suggérant un effet bénéfique de l'hCG. Il y avait un risque significativement plus élevé de syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) lorsque l'hCG était utilisé (Peto OR 3,62 , IC 95% 1,85 à 7,06).

Il y avait huit études (875 femmes) dans la seconde comparaison, progestérone par rapport à placebo ou absence de traitement. Les résultats suggèrent un effet significatif en faveur de la progestérone pour le taux de naissances vivantes (Peto OR 2,95 , IC 95% 1,02 à 8,56) sur la base d'une étude. Pour les grossesses cliniques (GC), les résultats ont également suggéré un résultat significatif en faveur de la progestérone (Peto OR 1,83 , IC 95% 1,29 à 2,61) sur la base de sept études. Pour tout le reste, les résultats n'ont indiqué aucune différence

La troisième comparaison (15 études, 2117 femmes) portait sur le schéma thérapeutique progestérone par rapport au schéma hCG. Les schémas thérapeutiques hCG ont été subdivisés en comparaisons de la progestérone par rapport au hCG et de la progestérone par rapport à progestérone + hCG. Les résultats n'ont pas montré de différence d'effet entre les interventions, sauf pour les SHO. L'analyse par sous-groupes de la progestérone par rapport à progestérone + hCG a fait ressortir un avantage significatif pour la progestérone (Peto OR 0,45 , IC 95% 0,26 à 0,79).

La quatrième comparaison (neuf études, 1571 femmes) portait sur la progestérone par rapport à progestérone + œstrogène. Les résultats ont été subdivisés selon le mode d'administration. Les résultats pour le taux de grossesse clinique dans le sous-groupe 'progestérone par rapport à progestérone + œstrogène transdermique' suggèrent un avantage significatif pour progestérone + œstrogène. Il n'y avait aucune différence d'effet pour les autres critères de jugement.

Six études (1646 femmes) évaluaient la progestérone par rapport à progestérone + agoniste de la GnRH. Nous avons subdivisé les études entre agoniste de la GnRH en dose unique et agoniste de la GnRH en doses multiples. Pour les taux de naissances vivantes, de grossesses cliniques et de grossesses en cours les résultats suggèrent un bénéfice de la progestérone + agoniste de la GnRH, avec des taux significativement plus bas dans le groupe de progestérone. Le Peto OR pour le taux de naissances vivantes était de 0,40 (IC 95% 0,26 à 0,61), pour le taux de grossesses cliniques il était de 0,74 (IC à 95% 0,60 à 0,90) et pour le taux de grossesses en cours il était de 0,76 (IC à 95% 0,60 à 0,97). Les résultats concernant les fausses couches et les grossesses multiples n'indiquaient pas de différence d'effet.

La dernière comparaison (32 études, 9839 femmes) examinait différents schémas thérapeutiques de progestérone : injection intramusculaire (IM) par rapport à administration orale, IM par rapport à administration par voie vaginale ou rectale, administration par voie vaginale ou rectale par rapport à administration orale, administration par voie vaginale d'une dose faible par rapport à celle d'une dose forte, protocole court par rapport à protocole long et progestérone micronisée par rapport à progestérone synthétique. Les principaux résultats de cette comparaison n'ont pas indiqué de différence d'effet, sauf dans certaines analyses en sous-groupes. Pour le critère de grossesse clinique, l'analyse du sous-groupe de progestérone micronisée par rapport à progestérone synthétique a montré un avantage pour la progestérone synthétique, avec un taux significativement plus bas dans le groupe de progestérone micronisée (Peto OR 0,79 , IC 95% 0,65 à 0,96). Pour le critère de grossesse multiple, l'analyse en sous-groupe de progestérone IM par rapport à progestérone orale a suggéré un avantage pour la progestérone orale, avec un taux significativement plus élevé dans le groupe de progestérone IM (Peto OR 4,39 , IC 95% 1,28 à 15,01).

Conclusions des auteurs

Cet examen a montré un effet significatif en faveur de la progestérone pour le soutien de la phase lutéale, avec un avantage de la progestérone synthétique sur la progestérone micronisée. Globalement, l'ajout d'autres substances telles qu'œstrogène ou hCG n'a pas semblé améliorer les résultats. Nous n'avons pas non plus trouvé d’éléments en faveur d'un mode ou d'une durée d'administration spécifiques de la progestérone. Nous avons constaté que l'hCG, ou l'hCG avec progestérone, était associé à un risque plus élevé de SHO. L'utilisation d'hCG doit donc être évitée. Des résultats significatifs ont montré un effet bénéfique de l'ajout d'agoniste de la GnRH à la progestérone pour les critères de naissances vivantes, grossesses cliniques et grossesses en cours. À ce stade, la progestérone semble être la meilleure option pour le soutien de la phase lutéale, avec de meilleurs résultats de grossesse quand la progestérone synthétique est utilisée.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Soutien de la phase lutéale dans les cycles de procréation assistée

Soutien de la phase lutéale pour la procréation assistée

Le cycle menstruel féminin se compose de différentes phases. Après l'ovulation commence la phase lutéale qui dure jusqu'à la prochaine menstruation. Elle est nommée d'après le corpus luteum, le corps jaune. Celui-ci est constitué des restes de l'ovule dans l'ovaire et produit différentes hormones, dont la progestérone. La progestérone stimule la prolifération de la muqueuse de l'utérus, en préparation de l'implantation.

Lorsque la fécondation in vitro (FIV) et l'injection intracytoplasmique de spermatozoïdes (IICS) sont utilisées pour le traitement de l'hypofertilité, la fécondation a lieu en dehors du corps humain. Le protocole standard est d'obtenir autant d'œufs que possible. L'hypophyse de la femme est désensibilisée, ce qui permet de stimuler les ovaires. Ce processus est appelé hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée. De cette manière, plus d'œufs matures sont produits, ce qui augmente les chances de réussite de la fécondation. Cette hyperstimulation entraîne une malformation dans la phase lutéale, ce qui signifie que les multiples corps jaunes sont incapables de produire suffisamment de progestérone.

Sachant qu'un niveau faible de progestérone peut réduire les chances d'implantation, la phase lutéale doit être soutenue. Cela peut impliquer de la progestérone par voie orale, vaginale ou intramusculaire, de la gonadotrophine chorionique humaine (hCG) (qui stimule la production de progestérone) ou des agonistes de la gonadolibérine (GnRH). Les agonistes de la GnRH stimulent la production de GnRH, une hormone responsable de l'hormone folliculo-stimulante (FSH) et de l'hormone lutéinisante (LH) qui déclenche l'ovulation et développe le corps jaune. Les agonistes de la GnRH sont supposés restaurer les niveaux de LH et soutenir naturellement la phase lutéale.

De nombreux types d'intervention, dosages et voies d'administration pour le soutien de la phase lutéale ont été étudiés. Nous avons effectué six comparaisons différentes, avec une moyenne de six études par comparaison. Nous avons trouvé six résultats statistiquement significatifs. La progestérone a été plus efficace que le placebo pour les naissances vivantes et les grossesses cliniques. Il existe deux formes différentes de progestérone, la micronisée (naturelle) et la synthétique. Lorsqu'on les compare, les résultats sont à l'avantage de la progestérone synthétique. Lorsque nous avons comparé la progestérone avec la progestérone + une dose unique d'agoniste de la GnRH, les résultats étaient en faveur de la supplémentation en agonistes de la GnRH pour ce qui est des naissances vivantes et des grossesses cliniques. Dans la comparaison de la progestérone avec progestérone + doses multiples d'agoniste de la GnRH, les résultats étaient de nouveau en faveur de la supplémentation en agonistes de la GnRH. Nous avons également constaté que l'utilisation de l'hCG était liée à un risque significativement plus élevé d'effet secondaire du syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO).

Étant donné qu'il n'y avait qu'un petit nombre d'études dans chaque comparaison, nous ne pouvons pas être trop sûrs de ces résultats. Cette incertitude est renforcée par la méthodologie peu claire et le risque élevé de biais de la plupart des études incluses.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français