Intervention Review

Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion in children

  1. Alice van Zon1,*,
  2. Geert J van der Heijden1,
  3. Thijs MA van Dongen1,
  4. Martin J Burton2,
  5. Anne GM Schilder1,3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group

Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 22 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009163.pub2

How to Cite

van Zon A, van der Heijden GJ, van Dongen TMA, Burton MJ, Schilder AGM. Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD009163. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009163.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands

  2. 2

    UK Cochrane Centre, Oxford, UK

  3. 3

    Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London, ENT Clinical Trials Programme, Ear Institute, London, UK

*Alice van Zon, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht, 3508 AB, Netherlands. alicevanzon@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 SEP 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Otitis media with effusion (OME) is characterised by an accumulation of fluid in the middle ear behind an intact tympanic membrane, without the symptoms or signs of acute infection. In approximately one in three children with OME, however, a bacterial pathogen is identified in the middle ear fluid. In most cases, OME causes mild hearing impairment of short duration. When experienced in early life and when episodes of (bilateral) OME persist or recur, the associated hearing loss may be significant and have a negative impact on speech development and behaviour. Since most cases of OME will resolve spontaneously, only children with persistent middle ear effusion and associated hearing loss potentially require treatment. Previous Cochrane reviews have focused on the effectiveness of ventilation tube insertion, adenoidectomy, autoinflation, antihistamines, decongestants, and oral and topical intranasal steroids in OME. This review focuses on the effectiveness of antibiotics in children with OME.

Objectives

To assess the effects of antibiotics in children up to 18 years with OME.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 22 February 2012.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing oral antibiotics with placebo, no treatment or therapy of unproven effectiveness. Our primary outcome was complete resolution of OME at two to three months. Secondary outcomes included resolution of OME at other time points, hearing, language and speech, ventilation tube insertion and adverse effects.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data using standardised data extraction forms and assessed the quality of the included studies using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool. We presented dichotomous results as risk differences as well as risk ratios, with their 95% confidence intervals. If heterogeneity was greater than 75% we did not pool data.

Main results

We included 23 studies (3027 children) covering a range of antibiotics, participants, outcome measures and time points of evaluation. Overall, we assessed the studies as generally being at low risk of bias.

Our primary outcome was complete resolution of OME at two to three months. The differences (improvement) in the proportion of children having such resolution (risk difference (RD)) in the five individual included studies ranged from 1% (RD 0.01, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.12; not significant) to 45% (RD 0.45, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.65). Results from these studies could not be pooled due to clinical and statistical heterogeneity.

Pooled analysis of data for complete resolution at more than six months was possible, with an increase in resolution of 13% (RD 0.13, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.19).

Pooled analysis was also possible for complete resolution at the end of treatment, with the following increases in resolution rates: 17% (RD 0.17, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.24) for treatment for 10 days to two weeks, 34% (RD 0.34, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.50) for treatment for four weeks, 32% (RD 0.32, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.47) for treatment for three months, and 14% (RD 0.14, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.24) for treatment continuously for at least six months.

We were unable to find evidence of a substantial improvement in hearing as a result of the use of antibiotics for otitis media with effusion; nor did we find an effect on the rate of ventilation tube insertion. We did not identify any trials that looked at speech, language and cognitive development or quality of life. 

Data on the adverse effects of antibiotic treatment reported in six studies could not be pooled due to high heterogeneity. Increases in the occurrence of adverse events varied from 3% (RD 0.03, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.07; not significant) to 33% (RD 0.33, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.44) in the individual studies.

Authors' conclusions

The results of our review do not support the routine use of antibiotics for children up to 18 years with otitis media with effusion. The largest effects of antibiotics were seen in children treated continuously for four weeks and three months. Even when clear and relevant benefits of antibiotics have been demonstrated, these must be balanced against the potential adverse effects when making treatment decisions. Immediate adverse effects of antibiotics are common and the emergence of bacterial resistance has been causally linked to the widespread use of antibiotics for common conditions such as otitis media.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion ('glue ear') in children

Otitis media with effusion (OME) or 'glue ear' is one of the most common conditions of early childhood. Glue ear means that there is fluid in the middle ear space behind the eardrum. This may cause hearing difficulties that may in turn affect children's behaviour, language and progress at school. Glue ear is closely related to acute otitis media; children with glue ear are prone to frequent acute middle ear infections, and after an acute middle ear infection all children suffer from glue ear for some time. In approximately one in three children with glue ear bacteria are identified in the middle ear fluid. Therefore, this review focuses on the effectiveness of antibiotics in children with glue ear.

We looked at 23 studies including 3027 children in total. These studies compared children with glue ear who were treated with antibiotics to those who were not. In these studies many different antibiotics were used and the patients were of different ages and had suffered from glue ear for various lengths of times. They looked at the benefits at various time points after the treatment was given.

The most important outcome that we measured was the difference in the proportion of children who no longer had glue ear two to three months after the treatment was started. This varied from 1% to 45% in favour of the children who had been treated with antibiotics. Results from these studies could not be combined because they were too different in a number of ways, including the type of children they had looked at and the study design. When we looked at the results six months after the treatment was started, 14% more children treated with antibiotics no longer had glue ear compared to those not treated with antibiotics. The largest benefits of antibiotics were seen in children who had been given antibiotics continuously for four weeks or three months; 32% to 34% more children who had been treated with antibiotics no longer had glue ear at the end of treatment.

We did not find evidence of a substantial improvement in hearing as a result of the use of antibiotics for glue ear, nor did we find an effect on the number of children that were treated with grommets. We could not identify any studies that looked at speech, language and cognitive development or the well being of the children.

The results of our review do not support the idea that children with glue ear should routinely be treated with antibiotics. The modest potential benefits mentioned above must always be balanced against the side effects and risks of using antibiotics.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotiques utilisés en cas d'otite moyenne avec effusion chez les enfants

Contexte

L'otite moyenne avec effusion (OME) se caractérise par une accumulation de liquide dans l'oreille moyenne derrière une membrane tympanique intacte, sans symptômes ou signes d'infection aigüe. Chez environ un enfant sur trois avec une OME, un agent pathogène bactérien est toutefois identifié dans le liquide de l'oreille moyenne. Dans la plupart des cas, l'OME entraine une déficience auditive moyenne de courte durée. Lorsque cela arrive pendant la petite enfance et si les épisodes d'OME (bilatérale) persistent ou sont récurrents, la perte auditive associée peut être importante et avoir un impact négatif sur le développement du langage et le comportement. Comme la plupart des cas d'OME se résolvent spontanément, seuls les enfants avec un effusion persistante au niveau de l'oreille moyenne et une perte auditive associée nécessitent potentiellement un traitement. Les précédentes revues Cochrane se sont concentrées sur l'efficacité de l'insertion de canules, l'adénoïdectomie, l'auto-gonflement, les anti-histaminiques, les décongestionnants et les stéroïdes par voie intranasale, orale et topique en cas d'OME. Cette revue se concentre sur l'efficacité des antibiotiques chez les enfants souffrant d'une OME.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des antibiotiques chez les enfants de moins de 18 ans souffrant d'OME.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'otorhinolaryngologie, dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), ainsi que dans PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, ICTRP et autres sources afin de trouver des essais publiés et non publiés. La recherche a été effectuée le 22 février 2012.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés comparant les antibiotiques oraux à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement ou à une thérapie d'efficacité non reconnue. Notre principal critère de jugement était la résolution complète de l'OME entre deux et trois mois. Les critères de jugement secondaires comprenaient la résolution de l'OME à d'autres points temporels, l'audition, le langage et la parole, l'insertion de diabolos et les effets indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont extrait les données de manière indépendante à l'aide des formulaires standardisés d'extraction des données et ont évalué la qualité des études incluses avec l'outil Cochrane d'évaluation des risques de biais. Nous avons présenté les résultats dichotomiques en tant que différences de risques et ratios de risque, avec des intervalles de confiance à 95 %. Si l'hétérogénéité était supérieure à 75 %, nous n'avons pas regroupé les données.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 23 études (3 027 enfants) couvrant une gamme d'antibiotiques, de participants, de critères de jugement et de points temporels d'évaluation. Globalement, nous avons évalué les études comme étant généralement à faible risque de biais.

Notre principal critère de jugement était la résolution complète de l'OME entre deux et trois mois. Les différences (l'amélioration) dans la proportion d'enfants expérimentant cette résolution (différence de risque (DR)) dans les cinq études incluses individuelles allaient de 1 % (DR 0,01, IC à 95 % -0,11 à 0,12 ; non significatif) à 45 % (DR 0,45, IC à 95 % 0,25 à 0,65). Les résultats de ces études n'ont pas pu être regroupés en raison de l'hétérogénéité clinique et statistique.

L'analyse regroupée des données pour la résolution complète à plus de six mois était possible, avec une hausse de la résolution de 13 % (DR 0,13, IC à 95 % 0,06 à 0,19).

L'analyse regroupée était également possible pour la résolution complète à la fin du traitement, avec les hausses suivantes des taux de résolution : 17 % (DR 0,17, IC à 95 % 0,09 à 0,24) pour un traitement durant entre 10 jours et deux semaines, 34 % (DR 0,34, IC à 95 % 0,19 à 0,50) pour un traitement durant quatre semaines, 32 % (DR 0,32, IC à 95 % 0,17 à 0,47) pour un traitement durant trois mois et 14 % (DR 0,14, IC à 95 % 0,03 à 0,24) pour un traitement continu pendant au moins six mois.

Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves d'amélioration substantielle au niveau de l'audition suite à l'utilisation des antibiotiques pour une otite moyenne avec effusion, tout comme nous n'avons pas trouvé d'effet sur le taux d'insertion de diabolos. Nous n'avons identifié aucun essai qui étudiait la parole, le langage et la développement cognitif ou la qualité de vie.

Les données sur les effets indésirables du traitement antibiotique figurant dans six études n'ont pas pu être regroupées en raison de l'importante hétérogénéité. Les augmentations d'occurrence des effets indésirables variaient de 3 % (DR 0,03, IC à 95 % -0,01 à 0,07 ; non significatif) à 33 % (DR 0,33, IC à 95 % 0,22 à 0,44) dans les études individuelles.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats de notre revue n'appuient pas l'utilisation systématique d'antibiotiques chez les enfants de moins de 18 ans souffrant d'une otite moyenne avec effusion. Les effets les plus importants des antibiotiques ont été constatés chez les enfants traités en continu pendant quatre semaines et trois mois. Même si des avantages clairs et pertinents des antibiotiques ont été démontrés, ils doivent être mis en balance avec les effets indésirables potentiels lorsqu'une décision de traitement est prise. Les effets indésirables immédiats des antibiotiques sont courants et l'émergence d'une résistance bactérienne a été de fait associée à l'utilisation répandue des antibiotiques pour des affections courantes telles que les otites moyennes.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotiques utilisés en cas d'otite moyenne avec effusion chez les enfants

Antibiotiques utilisés en cas d'otite moyenne avec effusion ('otite séreuse') chez les enfants

L'otite moyenne avec effusion (OME) ou 'otite séreuse' est l'une des affections les plus courantes de la petite enfance. L'otite séreuse signifie qu'il y a du liquide dans l'oreille moyenne, derrière le tympan. Cela peut entraîner des difficultés auditives qui peuvent en retour affecter le comportement des enfants, leur langage et leurs progrès à l'école. L'otite séreuse est très proche de l'otite moyenne aigüe ; les enfants qui ont une otite séreuse sont enclins à des infections aigües fréquentes de l'oreille moyenne, et après une infection aigüe de l'oreille moyenne, tous les enfants souffrent d'une otite séreuse pendant un certain temps. Chez environ un enfant sur trois avec une otite séreuse, des bactéries sont identifiées dans le liquide de l'oreille moyenne. Par conséquent, cette revue se concentre sur l'efficacité des antibiotiques chez les enfants souffrant d'une otite séreuse.

Nous avons examiné 23 études totalisant 3 027 enfants. Ces études comparaient des enfants avec une otite séreuse qui étaient traités avec des antibiotiques à ceux qui ne l'étaient pas. Dans ces études, de nombreux antibiotiques différents étaient utilisés ; les patients étaient d'âge différent et souffraient d'une otite séreuse depuis plus ou moins longtemps. Elles étudiaient les avantages à différents points temporels après que le traitement ait été administré.

Le principal critère de jugement que nous avons mesuré était la différence dans la proportion d'enfants qui n'avaient plus d'otite séreuse deux à trois mois après le début du traitement. Cela variait de 1 à 45 % en faveur des enfants qui avaient été traités avec des antibiotiques. Les résultats de ces études ne pouvaient pas être combinés parce qu'ils étaient trop différents, y compris dans le type d'enfants étudiés et la conception de l'étude. Lorsque nous avons examiné les résultats six mois après le début du traitement, 14 % en plus d'enfants traités par antibiotiques n'avaient plus d'otite séreuse par rapport à ceux qui n'avaient pas été traités par antibiotiques. Les avantages les plus importants des antibiotiques ont été constatés chez les enfants qui ont reçu des antibiotiques en continu pendant quatre semaines ou trois mois ; 32 à 34 % en plus d'enfants ayant été traités par antibiotiques n'avaient plus d'otite séreuse à la fin du traitement.

Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves d'amélioration substantielle au niveau de l'audition suite à l'utilisation des antibiotiques pour une otite séreuse, tout comme nous n'avons pas trouvé d'effet sur le nombre d'enfants qui étaient traités avec des diabolos. Nous n'avons pas pu identifier d'études qui examinaient la parole, le langage et le développement cognitif ou le bien être des enfants.

Les résultats de notre revue ne soutiennent pas l'idée que les enfants souffrant d'otite séreuse doivent être systématiquement traités avec des antibiotiques. Les avantages potentiels modestes mentionnés ci-dessus doivent toujours être mis en balance avec les effets secondaires et les risques liés à l'usage d'antibiotiques.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 30th October, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français