Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Telephone delivered interventions for reducing morbidity and mortality in people with HIV infection

  1. Sarah Gentry1,
  2. Michelle HMMT van-Velthoven2,
  3. Lorainne Tudor Car3,
  4. Josip Car2,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 3 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009189.pub2


How to Cite

Gentry S, van-Velthoven MHMMT, Tudor Car L, Car J. Telephone delivered interventions for reducing morbidity and mortality in people with HIV infection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009189. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009189.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter, UK

  2. 2

    Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK

  3. 3

    University of Split, Split, Croatia

*Josip Car, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Dunstans Road, Hammersmith, London, W6 8RP, UK. josip.car@imperial.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

This is one of three Cochrane reviews examining the role of the telephone in HIV/AIDS services. Telephone interventions, delivered either by landline or mobile phone, may be useful in the management of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in many situations. Telephone delivered interventions have the potential to reduce costs, save time and facilitate more support for PLHIV.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of voice landline and mobile telephone delivered interventions for reducing morbidity and mortality in people with HIV infection.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health, World Health Organisation’s The Global Health Library and Current Controlled Trials from 1980 to June 2011. We searched the following grey literature sources: Dissertation Abstracts International, Centre for Agriculture Bioscience International Direct Global Health database, The System for Information on Grey Literature Europe, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium database, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Society, AIDS Educational Global Information System and reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies comparing the effectiveness of telephone delivered interventions for reducing morbidity and mortality in persons with HIV infection versus in-person interventions or usual care, regardless of demographic characteristics and in all settings. Both mobile and landline telephone interventions were included, but mobile phone messaging interventions were excluded.

Data collection and analysis

Two reviewers independently searched, screened, assessed study quality and extracted data. Primary outcomes were change in behaviour, healthcare uptake or clinical outcomes. Secondary outcomes were appropriateness of the mode of communication, and whether underlying factors for change were altered. Meta-analyses, each of three studies, were performed for medication adherence and depressive symptoms. A narrative synthesis is presented for all other outcomes due to study heterogeneity.

Main results

Out of 14 717 citations, 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria (1381 participants).

Six studies addressed outcomes relating to medication adherence, and there was some evidence from two studies that telephone interventions can improve adherence. A meta-analysis of three studies for which there was sufficient data showed no significant benefit (SMD 0.49, 95% CI -1.12 to 2.11). There was some evidence from a study of young substance abusing HIV positive persons of the efficacy of telephone interventions for reducing risky sexual behaviour, while a trial of older persons found no benefit. Three RCTs addressed virologic outcomes, and there is very little evidence that telephone interventions improved virologic outcomes. Five RCTs addressed outcomes relating to depressive and psychiatric symptoms, and showed some evidence that telephone interventions can be of benefit. Three of these studies which focussed on depressive symptoms were combined in a meta-analysis, which showed no significant benefit (SMD 0.02, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.21 95% CI).

Authors' conclusions

Telephone voice interventions may have a role in improving medication adherence, reducing risky sexual behaviour, and reducing depressive and psychiatric symptoms, but current evidence is sparse, and further research is needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

The use of the telephone to improve the health of people with HIV infection

More than 34 million people were living with HIV in 2010, and more than 2.7 million new infections occurred in that year. Improvements in drug treatments for HIV mean that the life expectancy of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) is now almost the same as that of non-infected people. However, the disease is still incurable, and patients require support to cope with their chronic illness and need for lifelong medication. Interventions often require people to go for face to face consultations, but barriers to healthcare, such as lack of money, transportation problems and the stigma sometimes associated with attending a clinic for HIV treatment, can prevent people from receiving the care they need. Using the telephone to deliver care to PLHIV may overcome some of these barriers, and ultimately improve health. It may also reduce costs, save time, and reduce effort. This could allow for a greater frequency of contact with patients, and the opportunity to reach more people in need of care. Mobile phones are widely used in both developed and developing countries, making them a feasible method to deliver health interventions for PLHIV.  

The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of using the telephone to deliver interventions to improve the health of PLHIV compared to standard care. A comprehensive search of various scientific databases and other resources found 11 relevant studies. All of the studies were performed in the United States, and so the results may not apply to other countries, particularly developing countries. Some studies were aimed at any HIV positive person in the area in which the study was carried out, and others focused on specific groups of people, such as young substance using PLHIV, or older PLHIV. There were a lot of differences in the types of telephone interventions used in each study. There was some evidence that telephone interventions can improve medication adherence, reduce risky sexual behaviour, and reduce symptoms of depression in PLHIV. However, there were also a number of studies that suggested that telephone interventions were no more effective than usual care alone. We need more studies conducted in different settings to assess the effectiveness of telephone interventions for improving the health of PLHIV.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions réalisées par téléphone pour réduire la morbidité et la mortalité chez les personnes infectées par le VIH

Contexte

La présente revue fait partie de l'une des trois revues Cochrane examinant le rôle du téléphone dans les services dédiés au VIH/SIDA. Les interventions téléphoniques, réalisées soit sur des lignes fixes soit sur des téléphones portables, peuvent être utiles dans la gestion des personnes qui vivent avec le VIH (PVVIH) dans de nombreux cas. Les interventions réalisées par téléphone permettent de réduire les coûts, de gagner du temps et de faciliter l'assistance aux PVVIH.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions téléphoniques réalisées sur des lignes fixes et sur des téléphones portables pour réduire la morbidité et la mortalité chez les personnes infectées par le VIH.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health, World Health Organisation’s The Global Health Library et Current Controlled Trials de 1980 à juin 2011. Nous avons effectué une recherche dans les sources de la littérature grise suivantes : Dissertation Abstracts International, Centre for Agriculture Bioscience International Direct Global Health database, The System for Information on Grey Literature Europe, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium database, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Society, AIDS Educational Global Information System et les listes bibliographiques d'articles.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés, études contrôlées avant et après, et études de séries temporelles interrompues comparant l'efficacité des interventions réalisées par téléphone pour réduire la morbidité et la mortalité chez les personnes infectées par le VIH aux interventions en personne ou aux soins habituels, quelles que soient les caractéristiques démographiques et dans tous les cadres. Les interventions aussi bien sur des téléphones portables que sur des lignes fixes étaient incluses, mais les interventions par messagerie mobile étaient exclues.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux relecteurs ont effectué des recherches, analysé les résultats, évalué la qualité méthodologique des études et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Les principaux résultats portaient sur le changement de comportement, le recours aux soins de santé ou les résultats cliniques. Les résultats secondaires portaient sur l'adéquation du mode de communication, et la modification ou non des facteurs expliquant le changement. Des méta-analyses, pour chacune des trois études, ont été réalisées pour l'observance du traitement et les symptômes dépressifs. Une synthèse narrative est présentée pour tous les autres résultats en raison de l'hétérogénéité des études.

Résultats Principaux

Sur 14 717 références bibliographiques, 11 ECR remplissaient les critères d'inclusion (1 381 participants).

Six études étudiaient les résultats relatifs à l'observance du traitement, et certaines données issues de deux études indiquaient que les interventions téléphoniques peuvent améliorer l'observance. Une méta-analyse des trois études pour lesquelles les données étaient insuffisantes n'a pas constaté de bénéfice significatif (DMS 0,49, IC à 95 % -1,12 à 2,11). Il existe certaines données issues d'une étude portant sur de jeunes personnes séropositives et toxicomanes prouvant l'efficacité des interventions téléphoniques pour réduire les comportements sexuels à risque, tandis qu'un essai portant sur des personnes plus âgées n'a montré aucun bénéfice. Trois ECR ont étudié les résultats virologiques, et il existe très peu de données prouvant que les interventions téléphoniques ont amélioré les résultats virologiques. Cinq ECR étudiaient les résultats relatifs aux symptômes dépressifs et psychiatriques, et fournissaient quelques éléments indiquant que les interventions téléphoniques pourraient être bénéfiques. Trois de ces études qui étaient axées sur les symptômes dépressifs ont été combinées dans une méta-analyse, qui n'a montré aucun bénéfice significatif (DMS 0,02, IC à 95 % -0,18 à 0,21 IC à 95 %).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les interventions téléphoniques vocales peuvent jouer un rôle dans l'amélioration de l'observance du traitement, la réduction des comportements sexuels à risque, et la réduction des symptômes dépressifs et psychiatriques, mais les données actuelles sont rares et des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions réalisées par téléphone pour réduire la morbidité et la mortalité chez les personnes infectées par le VIH

L'utilisation du téléphone pour améliorer la santé des personnes infectées par le VIH

En 2101, plus de 34 millions de personnes vivaient avec le VIH, et plus de 2,7 millions de nouvelles infections se sont produites cette année-là. En raison de l''amélioration des traitements médicamenteux destinés au VIH, l'espérance de vie des personnes vivant avec le VIH/SIDA (PVVIH) est à présent presque identique à celle des personnes non infectées. Cependant, la maladie reste incurable, et les patients ont besoin de soutien pour faire face à leur maladie chronique et à la nécessité de prendre des médicaments à vie. Les interventions nécessitent souvent que les personnes se rendent à des consultations en face à face, mais des obstacles à l'accès aux services de santé, tels que le manque d'argent, les problèmes de transport et la stigmatisation parfois associée aux visites dans une clinique pour le traitement du VIH, peuvent empêcher les intéressés de recevoir les soins dont ils ont besoin. L'utilisation du téléphone pour administrer des soins aux PVVIH peut permettre de surmonter certains de ces obstacles, et donc d'améliorer la santé des patients. Elle peut également permettre une réduction des coûts, un gain de temps et une réduction des efforts. Elle peut également permettre d'augmenter la fréquence de contact avec les patients et les chances de traiter davantage de personnes qui ont besoin de soins. Les téléphones portables sont largement utilisés, aussi bien dans les pays développés que dans les pays en développement, ce qui fait d'eux une méthode réalisable pour proposer des interventions de santé à destination des PVVIH.  

L'objectif de cette revue était d'évaluer l'efficacité de l'utilisation du téléphone pour réaliser des interventions visant à améliorer la santé des PVVIH par rapport aux soins standard. Une recherche exhaustive de diverses bases de données scientifiques et d'autres ressources a permis de trouver 11 études pertinentes. Toutes les études ont été menées aux États-Unis, de sorte que les résultats pourraient ne pas s'appliquer aux autres pays, en particulier aux pays en développement. Certaines études portaient sur toute personne séropositive dans la région dans laquelle l'étude était réalisée, et d'autres étaient axées sur des groupes spécifiques de personnes, tels que les jeunes PVVIH toxicomanes ou les PVVIH plus âgées. Il existait des différences importantes quant aux types d'interventions téléphoniques utilisées dans chaque étude. Certains éléments indiquent que les interventions téléphoniques peuvent améliorer l'observance du traitement, réduire les comportements sexuels à risque et réduire les symptômes de dépression chez les PVVIH. Cependant, il existe également un certain nombre d'études semblant indiquer que les interventions téléphoniques n'étaient pas plus efficaces que les soins habituels seuls. Nous avons besoin d'études supplémentaires menées dans différents cadres pour évaluer l'efficacité des interventions téléphoniques dans l'amélioration de la santé des PVVIH.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.