Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Telephone delivered interventions for preventing HIV infection in HIV-negative persons

  1. Michelle HMMT van-Velthoven1,
  2. Lorainne Tudor Car2,
  3. Sarah Gentry3,
  4. Josip Car1,4,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009190.pub2


How to Cite

van-Velthoven MHMMT, Tudor Car L, Gentry S, Car J. Telephone delivered interventions for preventing HIV infection in HIV-negative persons. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009190. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009190.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK

  2. 2

    University of Split, Split, Croatia

  3. 3

    Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter, UK

  4. 4

    University of Ljubljana, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ljubljana, Slovenia

*Josip Car, josip.car@imperial.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

This is one of the three Cochrane reviews that examine the role of the telephone in HIV/AIDS services. Although HIV infection can be prevented, still a large number of new infections occur. More effective HIV prevention interventions are needed to reduce the number of people newly infected with HIV. Phone calls can be used to potentially more effectively deliver HIV prevention interventions. They have the potential to save time, reduce costs and facilitate easier access.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of voice landline and mobile telephone delivered HIV prevention interventions in HIV-negative persons.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health, the World Health Organization's Global Health Library and Current Controlled Trials from 1980 to June 2011. We searched the following grey literature sources: Dissertation Abstracts International and the Centre for Agricultural Bioscience International Direct Global Health database, the System for Information on Grey Literature Europe, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections database, International AIDS Society conference database, AIDS Education Global Information System and reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies comparing the effectiveness of delivering HIV prevention by phone calls to usual care in HIV-negative people regardless of their demographic characteristics and in all settings.

Data collection and analysis

Two reviewers independently searched databases, screened citations, assessed study quality and extracted data. A third reviewer resolved any disagreement. Primary outcomes were knowledge about the causes and consequences of HIV/AIDS, change in behaviour, healthcare uptake and clinical outcomes. Secondary outcomes were users' and providers' views on the intervention, economic outcomes and adverse outcomes.

Main results

Out of 14,717 citations, only one study met the inclusion criteria. The included RCT recruited women and girl children who received post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) after rape from sexual assault services in South Africa between August 2007 and May 2008.

Participants (n (number) =274) were randomised into a telephone support (n=136) and control (n=138) group. Control group participants received usual care (an interactive information session) from the sexual assault service during the 28 days in which they had to take PEP, with no further contact from the study staff. Telephone support group participants received standard care and phone calls from a counsellor throughout the 28 days when they had to take PEP.

Overall, adherence to PEP was not significantly (P=0.13) different between the intervention (38.2%) and control (31.9 %) groups. Also, the proportion of participants who read a pamphlet, did not return to collect medication or with a depression were not significantly different between the intervention and control groups (P=0.006, P=0.42, P=0.72 respectively). The proportion of participants who used a diary was significantly (P=0.001) higher in the intervention group (78.8%) versus the control group (69.9%). The study authors reported that there were no recorded adverse events. The RCT did not provide information about participants’ and providers’ evaluation outcomes, or economic outcomes. The study had a moderate risk of bias.

Authors' conclusions

We found only one RCT, with a moderate risk of bias, which showed that providing PEP support by phone calls did not result in higher adherence to PEP. However, the RCT was conducted in an upper-middle-income country with high HIV prevalence, on a high-risk population and the applicability of its results on other settings and contexts is unclear. There is a need for robust evidence from various settings on the effectiveness of using phone calls for providing PEP support and for other HIV prevention interventions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

The use of the telephone for the delivery of HIV prevention interventions

Although HIV infection can be prevented, every year a large number of people become newly infected with HIV. Interventions that teach people about HIV can change their attitudes and behaviour, and thereby prevent new HIV infections. These interventions often require people to go to health facilities, but barriers such as a lack of money, transport problems or stigma attached to HIV-positive serostatus can limit people's access to HIV prevention interventions. Landline or mobile phones calls can be used to potentially more effectively deliver HIV prevention interventions, because they may save people's time, reduce costs and give people easier access to healthcare.

The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness HIV prevention interventions delivered by phone calls compared to the standard way of delivering care. After a comprehensive search of various scientific databases and other resources, we found only one relevant study. This study was done in sexual assault services in South Africa. Study participants were women and girls who were given medication to prevent HIV infection (so called 'post-exposure prophylaxis' or 'PEP') after they had been raped. The participants were divided into two groups: one group of participants only received standard care and participants in the other group were given standard care and support via telephone calls to help them take their HIV prevention medication. Overall, only about one third of the participants took their HIV prevention medication for 28 days. The participants who received the phone calls were not more likely to take their medication than participants who only received standard care. Also, the phone calls did not decrease the number of participants with depression and did not increase the number of participants who read an information pamphlet or returned to collect HIV prevention medication. Only a higher percentage of participants who received the calls used a medication diary compared to the participants who did not receive the calls. No harmful effects of this intervention were reported. We could not find any information about other relevant outcomes, such as participants’ and healthcare providers’ satisfaction with the telephone intervention or costs. We urgently need more studies conducted in various settings comparing the effectiveness of the phone calls to other ways of delivering HIV prevention interventions to prevent new HIV infections.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions réalisées par téléphone pour prévenir l'infection par le VIH chez les personnes séronégatives

Contexte

La présente revue fait partie de l'une des trois revues Cochrane qui examinent le rôle du téléphone dans les services dédiés au VIH/SIDA. Bien qu'il soit possible de prévenir l'infection par le VIH, un grand nombre de nouvelles infections se produisent toujours. Des interventions de prévention du VIH plus efficaces sont nécessaires pour réduire le nombre de personnes nouvellement infectées par le VIH. Les appels téléphoniques peuvent être utilisés pour réaliser des interventions de prévention du VIH potentiellement plus efficaces. Ils permettent de gagner du temps, de réduire les coûts et de faciliter l'accès aux soins.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions de prévention du VIH réalisées par téléphone fixe et portable chez les personnes séronégatives.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health, the World Health Organization's Global Health Library et Current Controlled Trials de 1980 à juin 2011. Nous avons effectué une recherche dans les sources de la littérature grise suivantes : Dissertation Abstracts International and the Centre for Agricultural Bioscience International Direct Global Health database, the System for Information on Grey Literature Europe, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections database, International AIDS Society conference database, AIDS Education Global Information System et les listes bibliographiques d'articles.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés, études contrôlées avant et après, et études de séries temporelles interrompues comparant l'efficacité des interventions de prévention du VIH par appels téléphoniques aux soins habituels chez les personnes séronégatives quelles que soient leurs caractéristiques démographiques et dans tous les cadres.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux relecteurs ont effectué des recherches dans les bases de données, passé au crible les références bibliographiques, évalué la qualité méthodologique des études et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Un troisième relecteur a permis de résoudre tout désaccord. Les principaux résultats portaient sur les connaissances sur les causes et les conséquences du VIH/SIDA, le changement du comportement, le recours aux soins de santé et les résultats cliniques. Les résultats secondaires portaient sur la perception des utilisateurs et des prestataires sur l'intervention, les résultats économiques et les résultats négatifs.

Résultats Principaux

Sur 14 717 références bibliographiques, seule une étude remplissait les critères d'inclusion. L'ECR inclus portait sur des femmes et des filles recevant une prophylaxie post-exposition (PPE) suite à un viol dans des services aux victimes d'agression sexuelle en Afrique du Sud entre août 2007 et mai 2008.

Les participantes (n (nombre) = 274) étaient randomisées dans un groupe recevant un soutien téléphonique (n = 136) et un groupe témoin (n = 138). Les participantes du groupe témoin recevaient les soins habituels (une séance d'information interactive) de la part des services aux victimes d'agression sexuelle pendant les 28 jours durant lesquels elles devaient prendre la PPE, sans autre contact avec le personnel de l'étude. Les participantes du groupe recevant le soutien par téléphone recevaient les soins standard et des appels téléphoniques de la part d'un conseiller pendant les 28 jours durant lesquels elles devaient prendre la PPE.

Globalement, l'observance de la PPE n'était pas significativement (P = 0,13) différente entre les groupes recevant l'intervention (38,2 %) et témoin (31,9 %). Par ailleurs, la proportion de participantes qui lisaient une brochure, qui ne retournaient pas prendre leur traitement ou qui souffraient de dépression n'était pas significativement différente entre les groupes recevant l'intervention et témoin (P = 0,006, P = 0,42, P = 0,72 respectivement). La proportion de participantes qui utilisaient un carnet de traitement était significativement plus élevée (P = 0,001) dans le groupe recevant l'intervention (78,8 %) que dans le groupe témoin (69,9 %). Les auteurs de l'étude ont indiqué qu'aucun événement indésirable n'avait été signalé. L'ECR ne fournissait pas d'informations sur les résultats relatifs à l'évaluation par les participantes et les prestataires, ou les résultats économiques. L'étude présentait un risque de biais modéré.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé qu'un seul ECR, présentant un risque de biais modéré, qui indiquait que l'apport de soutien à la PPE à l'aide d'appels téléphoniques ne se traduisait pas par une meilleure observance de la PPE. Cependant, l'ECR a été réalisé dans un pays à revenu moyen supérieur où la prévalence du VIH est élevée, sur une population à haut risque, et la généralisabilité de ses résultats à d'autres cadres et contextes est incertaine. Il est nécessaire d'obtenir des données solides dans divers cadres sur l'efficacité des appels téléphoniques pour fournir un soutien à la PPE et pour d'autres interventions de prévention du VIH.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions réalisées par téléphone pour prévenir l'infection par le VIH chez les personnes séronégatives

Utilisation du téléphone pour réaliser des interventions de prévention du VIH

Bien qu'il soit possible de prévenir l'infection par le VIH, chaque année un grand nombre de personnes deviennent nouvellement séropositives. Les interventions qui informent le public sur le VIH peuvent modifier leurs attitudes et leur comportement, et ainsi prévenir de nouvelles infections par le VIH. Ces interventions nécessitent souvent que les personnes se rendent dans des établissements de santé, mais les obstacles tels que le manque d'argent, les problèmes de transport ou la stigmatisation autour de la séropositivité par le VIH peuvent limiter l'accès du public aux interventions de prévention du VIH. Les appels sur des lignes fixes ou mobiles peuvent être utilisés pour réaliser des interventions de prévention du VIH potentiellement plus efficaces, parce qu'ils peuvent faire gagner du temps aux personnes, réduire les coûts et faciliter l'accès aux soins de santé.

L'objectif de la présente revue était d'évaluer l’efficacité des interventions de prévention du VIH réalisées par appels téléphoniques en comparaison avec le moyen standard de fournir des soins. Après avoir effectué des recherches exhaustives dans plusieurs bases de données scientifiques et d'autres ressources, nous n'avons trouvé qu'une seule étude pertinente. Cette étude a été menée dans des services aux victimes d'agression sexuelle en Afrique du Sud. Les participants à l'étude étaient des femmes et des filles recevant un traitement destiné à prévenir l'infection par le VIH (dit « prophylaxie post-exposition » ou « PPE ») suite à un viol. Les participantes étaient divisées en deux groupes : un groupe de participantes ne recevaient que les soins standard et les participantes de l'autre groupe recevaient les soins standard et un soutien par des appels téléphoniques ayant pour but de les aider à prendre leur traitement de prévention contre le VIH. Globalement, seules environ un tiers des participantes prenaient leur traitement de prévention contre le VIH pendant 28 jours. Les participantes qui recevaient les appels téléphoniques n'étaient pas davantage susceptibles de prendre leur traitement que les participantes qui ne recevaient que les soins standard. Par ailleurs, les appels téléphoniques ne réduisaient pas le nombre de participantes souffrant de dépression et n'augmentaient pas le nombre de participantes qui lisaient une brochure d'information ou qui retournaient prendre leur traitement de prévention contre le VIH. On peut seulement noter qu'un pourcentage plus élevé de participantes qui recevaient les appels utilisaient un carnet de traitement par rapport aux participantes ne recevant pas les appels. Aucun effet nocif de cette intervention n'a été signalé. Nous n'avons pas pu trouver d'informations sur les autres résultats pertinents, tels que la satisfaction des participantes et des prestataires de soins de santé quant à l'intervention téléphonique et aux coûts. Nous avons un besoin urgent d'études supplémentaires réalisées dans divers cadres, comparant l'efficacité des appels téléphoniques aux autres moyens de réaliser des interventions de prévention du VIH pour prévenir les nouvelles infections par le VIH.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd June, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.