Intervention Review

Telephone communication of HIV testing results for improving knowledge of HIV infection status

  1. Lorainne Tudor Car1,
  2. Sarah Gentry2,
  3. Michelle HMMT van-Velthoven3,
  4. Josip Car3,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 JUN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009192.pub2


How to Cite

Tudor Car L, Gentry S, van-Velthoven MHMMT, Car J. Telephone communication of HIV testing results for improving knowledge of HIV infection status. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009192. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009192.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Split, Split, Croatia

  2. 2

    Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter, UK

  3. 3

    Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK

*Josip Car, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Dunstans Road, Hammersmith, London, W6 8RP, UK. josip.car@imperial.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

This is one of three Cochrane reviews that examine the role of the telephone in HIV/AIDS services. Both in developed and developing countries there is a large proportion of people who do not know they are infected with HIV. Knowledge of one's own HIV serostatus is necessary to access HIV support, care and treatment and to prevent acquisition or further transmission of HIV. Using telephones instead of face-to-face or other means of HIV test results delivery could lead to more people receiving their HIV test results.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of telephone use for delivery of HIV test results and post-test counselling.

To evaluate the effectiveness of delivering HIV test results by telephone, we were interested in whether they can increase the proportion of people who receive their HIV test results and the number of people knowing their HIV status.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PubMed Central, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health (CINAHL), WHOs The Global Health Library and Current Controlled Trials from 1980 to June 2011. We also searched grey literature sources such as Dissertation Abstracts International,CAB Direct Global Health, OpenSIGLE, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Society and AEGIS Education Global Information System, and reference lists of relevant studies for this review.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials (qRCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs), and interrupted time series (ITS) studies comparing the effectiveness of telephone HIV test results notification and post-test counselling to face-to-face or other ways of HIV test result delivery in people regardless of their demographic characteristics and in all settings.

Data collection and analysis

Two reviewers independently searched, screened, assessed study quality and extracted data. A third reviewer resolved any disagreement.

Main results

Out of 14 717 citations, only one study met the inclusion criteria; an RCT conducted on homeless and high-risk youth between September 1998 and October 1999 in Portland, United States. Participants (n=351) were offered counselling and oral HIV testing and were randomised into face-to-face (n=187 participants) and telephone (n=167) notification groups. The telephone notification group had the option of receiving HIV test results either by telephone or face-to-face. Overall, only 48% (n=168) of participants received their HIV test results and post-test counselling. Significantly more participants received their HIV test results in the telephone notification group compared to the face-to-face notification group; 58% (n=106) vs. 37% (n=62) (p < 0.001). In the telephone notification group, the majority of participants who received their HIV test results did so by telephone (88%, n=93). The study could not offer information about the effectiveness of telephone HIV test notification with HIV-positive participants because only two youth tested positive and both were assigned to the face-to-face notification group. The study had a high risk of bias.

Authors' conclusions

We found only one eligible study. Although this study showed the use of the telephone for HIV test results notification was more effective than face-to-face delivery, it had a high-risk of bias. The study was conducted about 13 years ago in a high-income country, on a high-risk population, with low HIV prevalence, and the applicability of its results to other settings and contexts is unclear. The study did not provide information about telephone HIV test results notification of HIV positive people since none of the intervention group participants were HIV positive. We found no information about the acceptability of the intervention to patients’ and providers’, its economic outcomes or potential adverse effects. There is a need for robust evidence from various settings on the effectiveness of telephone use for HIV test results notification.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

The use of telephone for the delivery of HIV testing results

A large proportion of people do not know they are infected with HIV. Knowledge of one’s own HIV serostatus is necessary to access HIV support, care and treatment and to prevent acquisition or further transmission of HIV. Patients often need to return to the testing site to receive HIV test results and post-test counselling one to two weeks later after being tested. Frequently, people do not return for their HIV test results, particularly in developing countries. In this setting, barriers such as lack of money, transportation or stigma attached to HIV positive serostatus prevent people from collecting their HIV test results. However, the HIV test results could also be delivered by a single phone call, either by a fixed line or a mobile phone. Given the recent rise in mobile phone use in both developed and developing countries, telephone HIV test result notification could be an effective and feasible method for increasing the number of people receiving HIV test results. The aim of this review was to assess effectiveness of the telephone for HIV test result delivery, compared with face-to-face or other methods of HIV test result notification. After a comprehensive search of various scientific databases and other resources, we found only one relevant study. This study was performed in 1998-1999 in the United States on high-risk and homeless youth. The participants were offered an HIV test and told that their HIV test results would be available in two weeks. They were then divided into two groups; one that had to return to the testing site to get their HIV test results, and another that had the option of receiving HIV test results either by telephone or face-to-face at the testing site. Overall, less than half of participants received their HIV test results. Most participants in the telephone notification group opted for telephone rather than in person delivery of HIV test results.The proportion of youth receiving their HIV test results in the telephone group was significantly higher compared to the face-to-face group. However, since none of the participants in the telephone group were HIV positive, the study could not provide information about the effectiveness of telephone HIV test result delivery in people with HIV. In addition, we could not find any information about other relevant outcomes such as participants’ and providers’ satisfaction with the telephone HIV test results delivery, cost or potential harmful effects of this intervention. We urgently need more studies conducted in various settings comparing the effectiveness of telephone to other ways of HIV test result delivery and providing other relevant information in addition to the proportion of people receiving their HIV test results.

  

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Communication téléphonique des résultats du test du VIH dans l'amélioration des connaissances de l'état de l'infection par le VIH

Contexte

La présente revue fait partie de l'une des trois revues Cochrane qui examinent le rôle du téléphone dans les services dédiés au VIH/SIDA. Dans les pays développés et en développement, il existe une proportion significative de personnes ignorant qu'elles sont infectées par le VIH. Il est nécessaire de connaître son propre statut sérologique au VIH pour avoir accès à la prise en charge, aux soins et au traitement du VIH, mais aussi pour prévenir toute contamination ou transmission ultérieure du VIH. L'utilisation du téléphone, au lieu d'une notification en personne ou d'autres méthodes de notification des résultats d'un test du VIH, pourrait accroître le nombre de personnes recevant les résultats de leur test du VIH.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité du téléphone pour communiquer les résultats d'un test du VIH, mais aussi pour fournir des conseils suite au test.

Pour évaluer l'efficacité de la notification téléphonique des résultats d'un test du VIH, nous avons cherché à savoir si elle peut augmenter la proportion de personnes recevant leurs résultats et le nombre de personnes connaissant leur statut sérologique au VIH.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PubMed Central, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health (CINAHL), WHOs The Global Health Library et Current Controlled Trials de 1980 à juin 2011. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les sources de la littérature grise, comme Dissertation Abstracts International, CAB Direct Global Health, OpenSIGLE, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Society et AEGIS Education Global Information System, ainsi que dans les listes bibliographiques des études pertinentes pour cette revue.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), des essais contrôlés quasi randomisés (ECqR), des études contrôlées avant et après (CAA) et des études de séries temporelles interrompues (STI) comparant l'efficacité de la notification par téléphone des résultats d'un test du VIH et de conseils suite à ce test à une notification en personne ou à d'autres méthodes de notification des résultats d'un test du VIH chez les personnes, quel que soient leurs caractéristiques démographiques et le lieu.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux relecteurs ont effectué des recherches, analysé les résultats, évalué la qualité méthodologique des études et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Un troisième relecteur a permis de résoudre tout désaccord.

Résultats Principaux

Sur 14 717 références, une seule étude répondait aux critères d'inclusion ; un ECR réalisé à Portland aux États-Unis, entre septembre 1998 et octobre 1999, chez des jeunes sans-abri particulièrement à risque. Des conseils et un test oral du VIH étaient proposés aux participants (n = 351) qui étaient randomisés à des groupes de notification en personne (n = 187 participants) et par téléphone (n = 167). Le groupe de notification téléphonique pouvait choisir de recevoir les résultats de leur test du VIH par téléphone ou en personne. Dans l'ensemble, seuls 48 % (n = 168) des participants recevaient les résultats de leur test du VIH, ainsi que des conseils suite à ce test. Un nombre nettement supérieur de participants recevaient les résultats de leur test du VIH dans le groupe de notification téléphonique par rapport au groupe de notification en personne ; 58 % (n = 106) contre 37 % (n = 62) (p < 0,001). Dans le groupe de notification téléphonique, la majorité des participants ayant reçu les résultats de leur test du VIH en étaient notifiés par téléphone (88 %, n = 93). L'étude ne fournissait aucune information concernant l'efficacité de la notification téléphonique d'un test du VIH chez des participants séropositifs, car seuls deux jeunes étaient séropositifs et tous les deux étaient assignés au groupe de notification en personne. L'étude présentait des risques de biais élevés.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé qu'une seule étude éligible. Bien que cette dernière ait montré que l'utilisation du téléphone pour notifier les résultats d'un test du VIH était plus efficace que la notification en personne, elle présente des risques de biais élevés. Cette étude a été réalisée il y a environ 13 ans dans un pays aux revenus élevés, chez une population particulièrement à risque, avec une faible prévalence du VIH et l'applicabilité de ses résultats à d'autres lieux et contextes reste indéterminée. Cette étude n'a fourni aucune information concernant la notification des résultats d'un test du VIH aux personnes séropositives, étant donné qu'aucun des participants du groupe expérimental n'était séropositif. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune information concernant l'acceptabilité de l'intervention chez les patients et les prestataires, ses résultats économiques ou ses éventuels effets indésirables. Des preuves probantes issues de lieux différents sont nécessaires concernant l'efficacité du téléphone pour la notification des résultats d'un test du VIH.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Communication téléphonique des résultats du test du VIH dans l'amélioration des connaissances de l'état de l'infection par le VIH

Utilisation du téléphone pour communiquer les résultats du test du VIH

Une proportion élevée de personnes ignorent qu'elles sont infectées par le VIH. Il est nécessaire de connaître son propre statut sérologique au VIH pour avoir accès à la prise en charge, aux soins et au traitement du VIH, mais aussi pour prévenir toute contamination ou transmission ultérieure du VIH. Les patients doivent généralement retourner au site de dépistage pour recevoir les résultats de leur test du VIH et des conseils une à deux semaines après avoir effectué le test. La plupart du temps, les personnes ne retournent pas chercher les résultats de leur test du VIH, surtout dans les pays en développement. Dans ce contexte, le manque d'argent, le transport ou la stigmatisation autour de la séropositivité par le VIH sont des obstacles empêchant les gens d'aller chercher les résultats de leur test du VIH. Toutefois, ces résultats pourraient également être communiqués par un simple appel téléphonique, via un téléphone fixe ou portable. Étant donné la hausse récente de l'utilisation de la téléphonie mobile dans les pays développés et en développement, le téléphone pourrait être une méthode de notification efficace et réalisable pour accroître le nombre de personnes recevant les résultats de leur test du VIH. L'objectif de la présente revue était de comparer l'efficacité de la communication téléphonique des résultats d'un test du VIH à leur communication en personne ou à d'autres méthodes de notification des résultats d'un test du VIH. Après avoir effectué des recherches exhaustives dans plusieurs bases de données scientifiques et d'autres ressources, nous n'avons trouvé qu'une seule étude pertinente. Cette étude a été réalisée aux États-Unis, entre 1998 et 1999, chez des jeunes sans-abri particulièrement à risque. Un test du VIH était proposé aux participants et ces derniers étaient informés que les résultats de ce test seraient disponibles deux semaines plus tard. Ils étaient ensuite divisés en deux groupes ; un dans lequel les participants devaient retourner au site de dépistage pour obtenir les résultats de leur test du VIH et un autre dans lequel ils pouvaient recevoir les résultats de leur test du VIH par téléphone ou en personne au site de dépistage. Dans l'ensemble, moins de la moitié des participants obtenaient les résultats de leur test du VIH. La majorité de ceux appartenant au groupe de notification téléphonique avaient opté pour la notification par téléphone, au lieu de la notification en personne, des résultats de leur test du VIH. La proportion de jeunes recevant les résultats de leur test du VIH dans le groupe de notification téléphonique était significativement plus élevée par rapport au groupe de notification en personne. Toutefois, étant donné qu'aucun des participants appartenant au groupe de notification téléphonique n'était séropositif, l'étude ne pouvait fournir aucune information concernant l'efficacité de la notification téléphonique des résultats d'un test du VIH aux personnes atteintes du VIH. De plus, nous n'avons pu trouver aucune information sur d'autres critères de jugement pertinents comme la satisfaction des participants et des prestataires concernant la notification téléphonique des résultats d'un test du VIH, les coûts ou les éventuels effets néfastes de cette intervention. Nous avons un besoin urgent d'études supplémentaires réalisées dans différents lieux et comparant l'efficacité du téléphone à d'autres méthodes de notification des résultats d'un test du VIH et fournissant d'autres informations pertinentes outre la proportion de personnes recevant les résultats de leur test du VIH.

  

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Sant� Fran�ais