Overview of Reviews

Pain management for women in labour: an overview of systematic reviews

  1. Leanne Jones1,
  2. Mohammad Othman1,
  3. Therese Dowswell1,
  4. Zarko Alfirevic2,
  5. Simon Gates3,
  6. Mary Newburn4,
  7. Susan Jordan5,
  8. Tina Lavender6,
  9. James P Neilson2,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009234.pub2


How to Cite

Jones L, Othman M, Dowswell T, Alfirevic Z, Gates S, Newburn M, Jordan S, Lavender T, Neilson JP. Pain management for women in labour: an overview of systematic reviews. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009234. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009234.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  2. 2

    The University of Liverpool, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    Division of Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School, The University of Warwick, Warwick Clinical Trials Unit, Coventry, UK

  4. 4

    National Childbirth Trust, Acton, London, UK

  5. 5

    Swansea University, Department of Nursing, Swansea, UK

  6. 6

    The University of Manchester, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Manchester, UK

*James P Neilson, Department of Women's and Children's Health, The University of Liverpool, First Floor, Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Crown Street, Liverpool, L8 7SS, UK. jneilson@liverpool.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The pain that women experience during labour is affected by multiple physiological and psychosocial factors and its intensity can vary greatly.  Most women in labour require pain relief. Pain management strategies include non-pharmacological interventions (that aim to help women cope with pain in labour) and pharmacological interventions (that aim to relieve the pain of labour).

Objectives

To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on the efficacy and safety of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions to manage pain in labour. We considered findings from non-Cochrane systematic reviews if there was no relevant Cochrane review.

Methods

We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 5), The Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 31 May 2011) and EMBASE (1974 to 31 May 2011) to identify all relevant systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials of pain management in labour. Each of the contributing Cochrane reviews (six new, nine updated) followed a generic protocol with 13 common primary efficacy and safety outcomes. Each Cochrane review included comparisons with placebo, standard care or with a different intervention according to a predefined hierarchy of interventions. Two review authors extracted data and assessed methodological quality, and data were checked by a third author. This overview is a narrative summary of the results obtained from individual reviews.

Main results

We identified 15 Cochrane reviews (255 included trials) and three non-Cochrane reviews (55 included trials) for inclusion within this overview. For all interventions, with available data, results are presented as comparisons of: 1. Intervention versus placebo or standard care; 2. Different forms of the same intervention (e.g. one opioid versus another opioid); 3. One type of intervention versus a different type of intervention (e.g. TENS versus opioid). Not all reviews included results for all comparisons. Most reviews compared the intervention with placebo or standard care, but with the exception of opioids and epidural analgesia, there were few direct comparisons between different forms of the same intervention, and even fewer comparisons between different interventions. Based on these three comparisons, we have categorised interventions into: " What works" ,“What may work”, and “Insufficient evidence to make a judgement”.

WHAT WORKS

Evidence suggests that epidural, combined spinal epidural (CSE) and inhaled analgesia effectively manage pain in labour, but may give rise to adverse effects. Epidural, and inhaled analgesia effectively relieve pain when compared with placebo or a different type of intervention (epidural versus opioids). Combined-spinal epidurals relieve pain more quickly than traditional or low dose epidurals. Women receiving inhaled analgesia were more likely to experience vomiting, nausea and dizziness.

When compared with placebo or opioids, women receiving epidural analgesia had more instrumental vaginal births and caesarean sections for fetal distress, although there was no difference in the rates of caesarean section overall. Women receiving epidural analgesia were more likely to experience hypotension, motor blockade, fever or urinary retention. Less urinary retention was observed in women receiving CSE than in women receiving traditional epidurals. More women receiving CSE than low-dose epidural experienced pruritus.  

WHAT MAY WORK

There is some evidence to suggest that immersion in water, relaxation, acupuncture, massage and local anaesthetic nerve blocks or non-opioid drugs may improve management of labour pain, with few adverse effects.  Evidence was mainly limited to single trials. These interventions relieved pain and improved satisfaction with pain relief (immersion, relaxation, acupuncture, local anaesthetic nerve blocks, non-opioids) and childbirth experience (immersion, relaxation, non-opioids) when compared with placebo or standard care. Relaxation was associated with fewer assisted vaginal births and acupuncture was associated with fewer assisted vaginal births and caesarean sections.

INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE

There is insufficient evidence to make judgements on whether or not hypnosis, biofeedback, sterile water injection, aromatherapy, TENS, or parenteral opioids are more effective than placebo or other interventions for pain management in labour. In comparison with other opioids more women receiving pethidine experienced adverse effects including drowsiness and nausea. 

Authors' conclusions

Most methods of non-pharmacological pain management are non-invasive and appear to be safe for mother and baby, however, their efficacy is unclear, due to limited high quality evidence. In many reviews, only one or two trials provided outcome data for analysis and the overall methodological quality of the trials was low. High quality trials are needed.

There is more evidence to support the efficacy of pharmacological methods, but these have more adverse effects. Thus, epidural analgesia provides effective pain relief but at the cost of increased instrumental vaginal birth.

It remains important to tailor methods used to each woman’s wishes, needs and circumstances, such as anticipated duration of labour, the infant's condition, and any augmentation or induction of labour.

A major challenge in compiling this overview, and the individual systematic reviews on which it is based, has been the variation in use of different process and outcome measures in different trials, particularly assessment of pain and its relief, and effects on the neonate after birth. This made it difficult to pool results from otherwise similar studies, and to derive conclusions from the totality of evidence. Other important outcomes have simply not been assessed in trials; thus, despite concerns for 30 years or more about the effects of maternal opioid administration during labour on subsequent neonatal behaviour and its influence on breastfeeding, only two out of 57 trials of opioids reported breastfeeding as an outcome. We therefore strongly recommend that the outcome measures, agreed through wide consultation for this project, are used in all future trials of methods of pain management.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pain management for women in labour – an overview

Women's experience of pain during labour varies greatly. Some women feel little pain whilst others find the pain extremely distressing.  A woman’s position in labour, mobility, and fear and anxiety or, conversely, confidence may influence her experience of pain. Several drug and non-drug interventions are available, and in this overview we have assessed 18 systematic reviews of different interventions used to reduce pain in labour, 15 of these being Cochrane reviews.

Most of the evidence on non-drug interventions was based on just one or two studies and so the findings are not definitive.  However, we found that immersion in water, relaxation, acupuncture and massage all gave pain relief and better satisfaction with pain relief. Immersion and relaxation also gave better satisfaction with childbirth. Both relaxation and acupuncture decreased the use of forceps and ventouse, with acupuncture also decreasing the number of caesarean sections. There was insufficient evidence to make a judgement on whether or not hypnosis, biofeedback, sterile water injection, aromatherapy, and TENS are effective for pain relief in labour. 

Overall, there were more studies of drug interventions. Inhaled nitrous oxide and oxygen (Entonox®) relieved pain, but some women felt drowsy, nauseous or were sick.  Non-opioid drugs (e.g. sedatives) relieved pain and some gave greater satisfaction with pain relief than placebo or no treatment, but satisfaction with pain relief was less than with opioids. Epidurals relieved pain, but increased the numbers of births needing forceps or ventouse, and the risk of low blood pressure, motor blocks (hindering leg movement), fever and urine retention. Combined spinal-epidurals gave faster pain relief but more women had itching than with epidurals alone, although urinary retention was less likely to be a problem. Local anaesthetic nerve blocks gave satisfaction but caused side effects of giddiness, sweating, tingling, and more babies had low heart rates. Parenteral opioids (injections of pethidine and related drugs) are less effective than epidural but there was insufficient evidence to make a judgement on whether or not they are more effective than other interventions for pain relief in labour.

Overall, women should feel free to choose whatever pain management they feel would help them most during labour. Women who choose non-drug pain management should feel free, if needed, to move onto a drug intervention. During pregnancy, women should be told about the benefits and potential adverse effects on themselves and their babies of the different methods of pain control. Individual studies showed considerable variation in how outcomes such as pain intensity were measured and some important outcomes were rarely or never included (for example, sense of control in labour, breastfeeding, mother and baby interaction, costs and infant outcomes). Further research is needed on the non-drug interventions for pain management in labour.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge de la douleur chez la femme pendant le travail : vue d'ensemble des revues systématiques

Contexte

La douleur que les femmes ressentent pendant le travail est conditionnée par plusieurs facteurs physiologiques et psychologiques et son intensité peut sensiblement varier. La majorité des femmes nécessitent un soulagement de la douleur pendant le travail. Les stratégies de prise en charge de la douleur incluent des interventions non pharmacologiques (destinées à aider les femmes à supporter la douleur pendant le travail) et des interventions pharmacologiques (destinées à soulager la douleur pendant le travail).

Objectifs

Récapituler les preuves issues des revues systématiques Cochrane concernant l'efficacité et la tolérance des interventions non pharmacologiques et pharmacologiques pour la prise en charge de la douleur pendant le travail. Nous avons pris en compte les résultats provenant de revues systématiques non Cochrane en l'absence de revue Cochrane pertinente.

Méthodes

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la base des revues systématiques Cochrane (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 5), la Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 2 sur 4), MEDLINE (de 1966 au 31 mai 2011) et EMBASE (de 1974 au 31 mai 2011) afin d'identifier toutes les revues systématiques pertinentes d'essais contrôlés randomisés concernant la prise en charge de la douleur pendant le travail. Chacune des revues Cochrane utilisées (neuf nouvelles, six mises à jour) suivaient un protocole générique composé de 13 critères de jugement principaux courants concernant l'efficacité et la tolérance. Chaque revue Cochrane incluait des comparaisons à un placebo, à des soins standard ou à une autre intervention conformément à une hiérarchie d'interventions prédéfinies. Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait des données et évalué la qualité méthodologique et un troisième auteur a vérifié les données. Cette vue d'ensemble est un récapitulatif narratif des résultats obtenus à partir de revues individuelles.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 15 revues Cochrane (255 essais inclus) et trois revues non Cochrane (55 essais inclus) à inclure dans cette présentation générale. Pour toutes les interventions disposant de données disponibles, les résultats sont présentés sous la forme de comparaisons : 1. Intervention par rapport à un placebo ou des soins standard ; 2. Différentes types correspondant à une même intervention (par ex. : comparaison d'un opioïde à un autre opioïde) ; 3. Un type d'intervention par rapport à un autre type d'intervention (par ex. : TENS par rapport à un opioïde). Seules quelques revues incluaient des résultats pour toutes les comparaisons. La majorité des revues comparaient l'intervention à un placebo ou à des soins standard, mais hormis les opioïdes et l'analgésie péridurale, il n'y avait que quelques comparaisons directes entre différents types correspondant à une même intervention et encore moins de comparaisons entre les différentes interventions. En fonction de ces trois comparaisons, nous avons classé ces interventions en trois catégories : « Interventions efficaces », « Interventions pouvant être efficaces » et « Preuves insuffisantes pour émettre un jugement ».

INTERVENTIONS EFFICACES

Les preuves suggèrent qu'une péridurale, une rachi-péridurale combinée (RPC) et l'inhalation d'analgésiques prennent efficacement en charge la douleur pendant le travail, mais peuvent entraîner des effets indésirables. La péridurale et l'inhalation d'analgésiques soulagent efficacement la douleur par rapport à un placebo ou à un autre type d'intervention (comparaison de la péridurale à des opioïdes). Les rachi-péridurales combinées soulagent la douleur plus rapidement que les péridurales classiques ou à faibles doses. L'inhalation d'un analgésique était plus susceptible de provoquer des vomissements, des nausées et des vertiges.

Comparée à un placebo ou aux opioïdes, les femmes bénéficiant d'une analgésie par péridurale accouchaient davantage par voie basse instrumentale et césarienne en raison de souffrances fœtales, bien qu'il n'y ait aucune différence au niveau des taux de césarienne dans l'ensemble. Les femmes recevant une analgésie par péridurale étaient plus exposées à des risques d'hypotension, de blocage moteur, de fièvre ou de rétention urinaire. Une diminution de la rétention urinaire était observée chez les femmes bénéficiant d'une rachi-péridurale combinée (RPC) par rapport aux femmes bénéficiant d'une péridurale classique. Davantage de femmes bénéficiant d'une RPC souffraient de prurit par rapport à une péridurale à faible dose.  

INTERVENTIONS POUVANT ÊTRE EFFICACES

Il existe quelques preuves suggérant que l'immersion dans l'eau, la relaxation, l'acupuncture, les massages et les blocages nerveux par anesthésie locale ou les médicaments non opioïdes peuvent améliorer la prise en charge de la douleur pendant le travail, avec peu d'effets indésirables. Ces preuves se limitaient généralement à des essais uniques. Ces interventions permettaient de soulager la douleur et amélioraient la satisfaction en termes de soulagement de la douleur (immersion, relaxation, acupuncture, blocages nerveux par anesthésie locale, médicaments non opioïdes) et d'expérience de l'accouchement (immersion, relaxation, médicaments non opioïdes) lorsqu'elles étaient comparées à un placebo ou à des soins standard. La relaxation était associée à une baisse du nombre d'accouchements par voie basse assistés et l'acupuncture était associée à une baisse du nombre d'accouchements par voie basse assistés et de césariennes.

PREUVES INSUFFISANTES

Il existe des preuves insuffisantes pour émettre des jugements, à savoir si l'hypnose, la rétroaction biologique, l'injection d'eau stérile, l'aromathérapie et la TENS ou les opioïdes parentéraux sont plus efficaces qu'un placebo ou d'autres interventions destinées à prendre en charge la douleur pendant le travail. Comparée aux autres opioïdes, davantage de femmes recevant de la péthidine ressentaient des effets indésirables, notamment des somnolences et des nausées.

Conclusions des auteurs

La plupart des méthodes non pharmacologiques de prise en charge de la douleur sont non-invasives et semblent être inoffensives pour la mère et son enfant. Toutefois, leur efficacité est incertaine en raison du nombre limité de preuves de bonne qualité. Dans plusieurs revues, seuls un ou deux essais fournissaient des données de résultats pour les analyses et la qualité méthodologique globale des essais était médiocre. Des essais de bonne qualité devront être réalisés.

Il existe davantage de preuves recommandant l'efficacité des méthodes pharmacologiques, en revanche leurs effets indésirables sont plus nombreux. Par conséquent, l'analgésie par péridurale permet de soulager efficacement la douleur, mais au prix d'une augmentation du nombre d'accouchements par voie basse instrumentale.

Il est important d'adapter les méthodes utilisées aux souhaits, aux besoins et aux circonstances de chaque femme, comme la durée anticipée du travail, l'état de santé du nourrisson et toute intensification ou déclenchement du travail.

Un défi majeur lors de la préparation de cette présentation générale, ainsi que les revues systématiques individuelles sur lesquelles elle repose, a été l'utilisation variée des différents processus et critères de jugement dans les différents essais, plus particulièrement pour l'évaluation de la douleur et son soulagement, ainsi que leurs effets sur le nouveau-né après l'accouchement. La combinaison des résultats issus des études par ailleurs similaires a donc été plus difficile, ainsi que les conclusions formulées à partir de l'ensemble des preuves obtenues. D'autres critères de jugement importants n'ont simplement pas été évalués dans les essais. Par conséquent, malgré des craintes pendant au moins 30 ans concernant les effets liés à l'administration d'opioïdes à la mère pendant le travail sur le comportement néonatal ultérieur et son influence sur l'allaitement, seuls deux essais sur 57 portant sur les opioïdes signalaient l'allaitement comme critère de jugement. Par conséquent, nous recommandons vivement que les critères de jugement, déterminés suite à un vaste processus de consultation pour ce projet, soient utilisés dans tous les futurs essais concernant les méthodes de prise en charge de la douleur.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge de la douleur chez la femme pendant le travail : vue d'ensemble des revues systématiques

Prise en charge de la douleur chez la femme pendant le travail - vue d'ensemble

Chez les femmes, l'expérience de la douleur varie sensiblement pendant le travail. Certaines ne ressentent quasiment aucune douleur, alors que d'autres ressentent une douleur extrêmement pénible. La position de la femme pendant le travail, sa mobilité, ainsi que sa peur et son anxiété ou, au contraire, sa confiance peuvent influencer son expérience de la douleur. Plusieurs interventions médicamenteuses et non médicamenteuses sont disponibles. Dans cette vue d'ensemble, nous avons évalué 18 revues systématiques concernant différentes interventions utilisées pour diminuer la douleur pendant le travail, dont 15 d'entre elles sont des revues Cochrane.

La majorité des preuves concernant les interventions non médicamenteuses se basaient uniquement sur une ou deux études, ces résultats ne sont donc pas définitifs. Cependant, nous avons découvert que l'immersion dans l'eau, la relaxation, l'acupuncture et les massages permettaient tous d'atténuer la douleur et d'améliorer la satisfaction en termes de soulagement de la douleur. L'immersion et la relaxation ont également amélioré la satisfaction de l'expérience de l'accouchement. La relaxation et l'acupuncture réduisaient le recours aux forceps et à une ventouse. L'acupuncture diminuait également le nombre de césariennes. Il y avait des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer si l'hypnose, la rétroaction biologique, l'injection d'eau stérile, l'aromathérapie et la neurostimulation transcutanée (TENS pour « Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation ») étaient efficaces pour soulager la douleur pendant le travail.

Dans l'ensemble, il y avait davantage d'études concernant des interventions médicamenteuses. L'inhalation d'oxyde nitreux et d'oxygène (Entonox®) permettait de soulager la douleur, mais provoquait chez certaines femmes des somnolences, des nausées ou des vomissements. Les médicaments non opioïdes (comme les sédatifs) soulageaient la douleur et certains amélioraient sensiblement la satisfaction en termes de soulagement de la douleur par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement, mais cette satisfaction était inférieure à celle liée à la prise d'opioïdes. Les péridurales soulageaient la douleur, mais augmentaient le nombre d'accouchements par forceps ou par ventouse et les risques d'hypotension, de blocages moteurs (impossibilité de bouger les jambes), de fièvre et de rétention urinaire. La rachi-péridurale combinée permettait de soulager plus rapidement la douleur, mais causaient davantage de démangeaisons par rapport à une péridurale seule. Toutefois, la rétention urinaire était moins susceptible d'être problématique. Les blocages nerveux par anesthésie locale donnaient satisfaction, mais généraient des effets secondaires tels que des vertiges, des sueurs, des picotements et davantage de bébés présentaient un ralentissement du rythme cardiaque. Les opioïdes parentéraux (injections de péthidine et de médicaments associés) sont moins efficaces que la péridurale, mais il y avait des preuves insuffisantes pour déterminer s'ils étaient plus efficaces ou pas que d'autres interventions destinées à soulager la douleur pendant le travail.

Les femmes devraient généralement être libres de choisir la solution de prise en charge de la douleur qui, d'après elles, les aiderait le plus pendant le travail. Les femmes qui choisissent une prise en charge de la douleur non médicamenteuse devraient pouvoir librement, le cas échéant, opter pour une intervention médicamenteuse. Pendant la grossesse, les femmes devraient être informées des effets bénéfiques et des éventuels effets indésirables des différentes méthodes de contrôle de la douleur susceptibles de les concerner, ainsi que leur bébé. Des études individuelles montraient une variation considérable entre la manière dont les critères de jugement, tels que l'intensité de la douleur, étaient évalués et certains critères de jugement importants qui étaient rarement, voire jamais, inclus (par exemple, le sentiment de contrôle pendant le travail, l'allaitement, l'interaction entre la mère et son bébé, les coûts et les résultats concernant le nourrisson). D'autres recherches devront être réalisées sur les interventions non médicamenteuses pour la prise en charge de la douleur pendant le travail.

Notes de traduction

Dans les futures mises à jour, les revues traitant des techniques de relaxation et des méthodes manuelles seront divisées en plusieurs revues sur le yoga, la musique, les sons, les massages et la réflexologie, respectivement.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français