This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (10 JUN 2014)

Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Automated versus non-automated weaning for reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation for critically ill adults and children

  1. Louise Rose1,*,
  2. Marcus J Schultz2,
  3. Chris R Cardwell3,
  4. Philippe Jouvet4,
  5. Danny F McAuley5,6,
  6. Bronagh Blackwood7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 6 JUN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 29 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009235.pub2

How to Cite

Rose L, Schultz MJ, Cardwell CR, Jouvet P, McAuley DF, Blackwood B. Automated versus non-automated weaning for reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation for critically ill adults and children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD009235. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009235.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Toronto, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, Toronto, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Laboratory of Experimental Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Queen's University Belfast, Centre for Public Health, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

  4. 4

    Sainte-Justine Hospital, University of Montreal, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

  5. 5

    Queen's University of Belfast, Centre for Infection and Immunity, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

  6. 6

    Royal Victoria Hospital, Regional Intensive Care Unit, Belfast, UK

  7. 7

    Queen's University Belfast, School of Medicine, Dentistry & Biomedical Sciences, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

*Louise Rose, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, 155 College St, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada. louise.rose@utoronto.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 6 JUN 2013

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (10 JUN 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Automated closed loop systems may improve adaptation of the mechanical support to a patient's ventilatory needs and facilitate systematic and early recognition of their ability to breathe spontaneously and the potential for discontinuation of ventilation.

Objectives

To compare the duration of weaning from mechanical ventilation for critically ill ventilated adults and children when managed with automated closed loop systems versus non-automated strategies. Secondary objectives were to determine differences in duration of ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS), mortality, and adverse events.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2); MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1948 to August 2011); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1980 to August 2011); CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (1982 to August 2011); and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). In addition we received and reviewed auto-alerts for our search strategy in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL up to August 2012. Relevant published reviews were sought using the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and the Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA Database). We also searched the Web of Science Proceedings; conference proceedings; trial registration websites; and reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials comparing automated closed loop ventilator applications to non-automated weaning strategies including non-protocolized usual care and protocolized weaning in patients over four weeks of age receiving invasive mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU).

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted study data and assessed risk of bias. We combined data into forest plots using random-effects modelling. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted according to a priori criteria.

Main results

Pooled data from 15 eligible trials (14 adult, one paediatric) totalling 1173 participants (1143 adults, 30 children) indicated that automated closed loop systems reduced the geometric mean duration of weaning by 32% (95% CI 19% to 46%, P = 0.002), however heterogeneity was substantial (I2 = 89%, P < 0.00001). Reduced weaning duration was found with mixed or medical ICU populations (43%, 95% CI 8% to 65%, P = 0.02) and Smartcare/PS™ (31%, 95% CI 7% to 49%, P = 0.02) but not in surgical populations or using other systems. Automated closed loop systems reduced the duration of ventilation (17%, 95% CI 8% to 26%) and ICU length of stay (LOS) (11%, 95% CI 0% to 21%). There was no difference in mortality rates or hospital LOS. Overall the quality of evidence was high with the majority of trials rated as low risk.

Authors' conclusions

Automated closed loop systems may result in reduced duration of weaning, ventilation, and ICU stay. Reductions are more likely to occur in mixed or medical ICU populations. Due to the lack of, or limited, evidence on automated systems other than Smartcare/PS™ and Adaptive Support Ventilation no conclusions can be drawn regarding their influence on these outcomes. Due to substantial heterogeneity in trials there is a need for an adequately powered, high quality, multi-centre randomized controlled trial in adults that excludes 'simple to wean' patients. There is a pressing need for further technological development and research in the paediatric population.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Do ventilators that manage the reduction in ventilator support (weaning) reduce the duration of weaning compared to strategies managed by clinicians?

Background and Importance

Critically ill patients receiving assistance from breathing machines (ventilators) may be restored to normal breathing using clinical methods (collectively termed weaning) that require both expertise and continuous monitoring. Inefficient weaning may result in a prolonged time on a ventilator putting patients at risk of lung injury, pneumonia, and death. At times delivery of the most effective and efficient care may be difficult due to organizational constraints. Computerized weaning systems may provide a solution to inefficient weaning methods. In this Cochrane review we evaluated if computerized weaning systems were more effective than clinical methods used by clinicians for reducing inappropriate delays in weaning, the overall duration of ventilation, and the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays.

Findings

We identified 17 studies that provided information on a total of 1173 people including 1143 adults and 30 children. Studies were conducted in people with medical reasons for needing admission to ICU such as pneumonia and other infections, people admitted following trauma, and people admitted after heart or other forms of surgery. As well, various commercially available computerized weaning systems were studied. We found that computerized weaning systems resulted in a reduced weaning duration as well as reduced overall time on the ventilator and stay in an ICU. The average time for a person to be weaned off the ventilator was reduced by 32%. The overall time on the ventilator was reduced by 17% and the length of stay in ICU by 11%. Not all studies demonstrated these reductions. Studies conducted only in people admitted to ICU following surgery did not demonstrate reductions in weaning, overall time on a ventilator, or ICU stay.

Limitations

Because of differences in the methods and results of some studies included in this review, further large scale research is warranted. There is also a need for more studies that examine the effect of computerized weaning systems in children.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Sevrage automatisé versus sevrage non-automatisé pour réduire la durée de la ventilation mécanique chez les adultes et les enfants gravement malades

Contexte

Les systèmes automatisés en boucle fermée peuvent améliorer l'adaptation du support mécanique aux besoins ventilatoires du patient et faciliter la reconnaissance systématique et précoce de leur capacité à respirer spontanément et de la possibilité d'arrêter la ventilation.

Objectifs

Comparer chez les adultes et les enfants gravement malades la durée du sevrage de la ventilation mécanique selon que celle-ci est gérée avec des systèmes automatisés en boucle fermée ou au moyen de stratégies non automatisées. Les objectifs secondaires étaient de déterminer les différences au niveau de la durée de ventilation, d'hospitalisation et de séjour en unité de soins intensifs (USI), ainsi que de la mortalité et des événements indésirables.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 2), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (de 1948 à août 2011), EMBASE (OvidSP) (de 1980 à août 2011), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (de 1982 à août 2011) et le Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). Nous avons en outre reçu et examiné des alertes automatiques pour notre stratégie de recherche dans MEDLINE, EMBASE et CINAHL jusqu'en août 2012. Des revues publiées pertinentes ont été examinées au moyen de la Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) et de la Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA Database). Nous avons également recherché dans les Web of Science Proceedings, des actes de conférence, des sites internet d'enregistrement d'essais cliniques et les références bibliographiques d'articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant des applications de ventilation automatisées en circuit fermé à des stratégies de sevrage non automatisées, notamment les soins habituels non protocolisés et le sevrage protocolisé chez des patients âgés de plus de quatre semaines sous ventilation mécanique invasive dans une unité de soins intensifs (USI).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante. Nous avons combiné les données dans des 'Forest plots' au moyen d'une modélisation à effets aléatoires. Des analyses en sous-groupe et de sensibilité ont été réalisées selon des critères pré-établis.

Résultats Principaux

Les données regroupées de 15 essais éligibles (14 sur des adultes, un sur des enfants) totalisant 1173 participants (1143 adultes, 30 enfants) indiquaient que les systèmes automatisés en boucle fermée avaient réduit la durée moyenne géométrique de sevrage de 32 % (IC 95% de 19% à 46%, P = 0,002 ), mais l'hétérogénéité était toutefois importante (I2 = 89%, P < 0,00001). Une réduction de la durée de sevrage a été constatée dans les populations mixtes ou médicales en USI (43%, IC 95% de 8% à 65%, P = 0,02) et Smartcare/PS™ (31%, IC 95% de 7% à 49%, P = 0,02) mais pas dans les populations chirurgicales ou utilisant d'autres systèmes. Les systèmes automatisés en boucle fermée avaient réduit la durée de ventilation (17%, IC 95% de 8 % à 26%) et la durée du séjour en USI (11%, IC 95% de 0% à 21%). Il n'y avait pas de différence en termes de mortalité ou de durée d'hospitalisation. Globalement, la qualité des données était bonne, la majorité des essais étant classés à faible risque.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les systèmes automatisés en boucle fermée peuvent entraîner une réduction de la durée du sevrage, de la ventilation et du séjour en ISU. Les réductions sont plus susceptibles de se produire dans des populations d'USI mixtes ou médicales. Étant donnés l'absence ou le caractère limité des données sur des systèmes automatisés autres que Smartcare/PS™ et Adaptive Support Ventilation, aucune conclusion ne peut être tirée quant à leur influence sur ces critères de résultat. Vue l'importante hétérogénéité des essais il y a besoin d'un essai contrôlé randomisé multi-centrique de bonne qualité et de puissance adéquate portant sur des adultes et excluant les patients 'faciles à sevrer'. Il y a un besoin urgent de nouveaux développements technologiques et de nouvelles recherches dans la population pédiatrique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Sevrage automatisé versus sevrage non-automatisé pour réduire la durée de la ventilation mécanique chez les adultes et les enfants gravement malades

Les systèmes de ventilation qui gèrent la réduction du soutien de ventilation (sevrage) réduisent-ils la durée du sevrage en comparaison avec les stratégies gérées par des cliniciens ?

Contexte et importance

Les patients gravement malades assistés par des respirateurs (i.e. sous ventilation) peuvent revenir à une respiration normale à l'aide de méthodes cliniques (collectivement désignées par le terme de sevrage) qui nécessitent de l'expertise et un suivi continu. Un sevrage inefficace peut entraîner une prolongation du placement sous ventilation, exposant les patients à un risque de lésion pulmonaire, de pneumonie et de mort. Il est parfois difficile de prodiguer les soins les plus efficaces en raison de contraintes organisationnelles. Les systèmes informatisés de sevrage pourraient apporter une solution aux méthodes de sevrage inefficaces. Dans cette revue Cochrane, nous avons évalué si les systèmes informatisés de sevrage étaient plus efficaces que les méthodes cliniques utilisées par les cliniciens quant à réduire les retards problématiques de sevrage, la durée totale de ventilation et les durées d'hospitalisation et de séjour en unité de soins intensifs (USI).

Résultats

Nous avons identifié 17 études qui ont fourni des renseignements sur un total de 1173 personnes, dont 1143 adultes et 30 enfants. Les études avaient été menées chez des personnes ayant du être admises en USI pour des raisons médicales telles que pneumonie et autres infections, des personnes admises suite à un traumatisme et des personnes admises après chirurgie cardiaque ou autre. En outre, divers systèmes informatisés de sevrage disponibles dans le commerce avaient été étudiés. Nous avons constaté que les systèmes informatisés de sevrage avaient entraîné une réduction de la durée de sevrage ainsi qu'une réduction du temps total passé sous ventilation et du séjour en unité de soins intensifs. Le temps moyen nécessaire au sevrage de la ventilation avait été réduit de 32 %. Le temps total sous ventilation avait été réduit de 17 % et la durée du séjour en USI de 11 %. Ces réductions n'avaient pas été mises en évidence dans toutes les études. Les études menées uniquement sur des personnes admises en USI suite à une opération ne montraient pas de réduction du sevrage, du temps total sous ventilation ou du séjour en USI.

Limitations

Étant données les différences dans les méthodes et les résultats de certaines études incluses dans cette revue, de nouvelles recherches à grande échelle sont nécessaires. Il y a aussi besoin de plus d'études examinant l'effet des systèmes informatisés de sevrage chez les enfants.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.