Intervention Review

Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay

  1. Marta Valentin-Gudiol1,*,
  2. Katrin Mattern-Baxter2,
  3. Montserrat Girabent-Farrés3,
  4. Caritat Bagur-Calafat4,
  5. Mijna Hadders-Algra5,
  6. Rosa Maria Angulo-Barroso6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 SEP 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009242.pub2


How to Cite

Valentin-Gudiol M, Mattern-Baxter K, Girabent-Farrés M, Bagur-Calafat C, Hadders-Algra M, Angulo-Barroso RM. Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009242. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009242.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Physical Therapy, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain

  2. 2

    University of the Pacific, Department of Physical Therapy, Stockton, CA, USA

  3. 3

    Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health, Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

  4. 4

    Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Sant Cugat Del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain

  5. 5

    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Groningen, Netherlands

  6. 6

    INEFC, University of Barcelona, Health and Applied Sciences, Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

*Marta Valentin-Gudiol, Physical Therapy, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, C/Josep Trueta s/n, Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, 08195, Spain. mvalentin@csc.uic.es.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Background

Delayed motor development may occur in children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy or children born preterm, which in turn may limit the child's opportunities to explore the environment. Neurophysiologic and early intervention literature suggests that task-specific training facilitates motor development. Treadmill intervention is a good example of locomotor task-specific training.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of treadmill intervention on locomotor motor development in pre-ambulatory infants and children under six years of age who are at risk for neuromotor delay.

Search methods

In March 2011 we searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1948 to March Week 2, 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Week 11, 2011), PsycINFO (1887 to current), CINAHL (1937 to current), Science Citation Index (1970 to 19 March 2011), PEDro (until 7 March 2011), CPCI-S (1990 to 19 March 2011) and LILACS (until March 2011). We also searched ICTRP, ClinicalTrials.gov, mRCT and CenterWatch.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials that evaluated the effect of treadmill intervention in children up to six years of age with delays in gait development or the attainment of independent walking or who were at risk of neuromotor delay.

Data collection and analysis

Four authors independently extracted the data using standardised forms. Outcome parameters were structured according to the "Body functions" and "Activity and Participation" components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children & Youth version (ICFCY), which was developed by the World Health Organization.

Main results

We included five studies, which reported on treadmill intervention in 139 children. Of the 139 children, 73 were allocated to treadmill intervention groups, with the other children serving as controls. The studies varied in the type of population studied (children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy or who were at risk for neuromotor delay); the type of comparison (for example, treadmill versus no intervention, high intensity treadmill versus low intensity); the time of evaluation (during the intervention or at various intervals after intervention), and the parameters assessed. Due to the diversity of the studies, we were only able to use data from three studies in meta-analyses and these were limited to two outcomes: age of onset of independent walking and gross motor function.

Evidence suggested that treadmill intervention could lead to earlier onset of independent walking when compared to no treadmill intervention (two studies; effect estimate -1.47; 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.97, 0.03), though these trials studied two different populations and children with Down syndrome seemed to benefit while it was not clear if this was the case for children at high risk of neuromotor disabilities. Another two studies, both in children with Down syndrome, compared different types of treadmill intervention: one compared treadmill intervention with and without orthotics, while the other compared high versus low intensity treadmill intervention. Both were inconclusive regarding the impact of these different protocols on the age at which children started to walk.

There is insufficient evidence to determine whether treadmill intervention improves gross motor function (two studies; effect estimate 0.88; 95% CI: -4.54, 6.30). In the one study evaluating treadmill with and without orthotics, results suggested that adding orthotics might hinder gross motor progress (effect estimate -8.40; 95% CI: -14.55, -2.25).

One study of children with Down syndrome measured the age of onset of assisted walking and reported those receiving the treadmill intervention were able to walk with assistance earlier than those who did not receive the intervention (effect estimate -74.00; 95% CI: -135.40, -12.60). Another study comparing high and low intensity treadmill was unable to conclude whether one was more effective than the other in helping children achieve supported walking at an earlier age (effect estimate -1.86; 95% CI: -4.09, 0.37).

One study of children at high risk of neuromotor disabilities evaluated step quality and found a statistically significant benefit from treadmill intervention compared to no treadmill intervention (effect estimate at 16 months of age: -15.61; 95% CI: -23.96, -7.27), but was not able to conclude whether there was a beneficial effect from treadmill training on step frequency at the same age (effect estimate at 16 months of age: 4.36; 95% CI: -2.63, 11.35). Step frequency was also evaluated in children with Down syndrome in another study and those who received high intensity rather than low intensity treadmill training showed an increased number of alternating steps (effect estimate 11.00; 95% CI: 6.03, 15.97).

Our other primary outcome, falls and injuries due to falls, was not measured in any of the included studies.

Authors' conclusions

The current review provided only limited evidence of the efficacy of treadmill intervention in children up to six years of age. Few studies have assessed treadmill interventions in young children using an appropriate control group (which would be usual treatment or no treatment). The available evidence indicates that treadmill intervention may accelerate the development of independent walking in children with Down syndrome. Further research is needed to confirm this and should also address whether intensive treadmill intervention can accelerate walking onset in young children with cerebral palsy and high risk infants, and whether treadmill intervention has a general effect on gross motor development in the various subgroups of young children at risk for developmental delay.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay

Children who have a diagnosis of Down syndrome or cerebral palsy, or who are born pre-term, may be delayed in their motor development. Delays in motor development limit children's ability to move and achieve motor milestones such as walking, running and jumping. Helping children to walk is often the focus of therapeutic intervention. There is a body of literature to suggest that the best way to do this is by getting the child to practice stepping with appropriate support. Treadmill training, in which the child is supported by a harness, provides an opportunity for children to walk with support for long enough periods of time to acquire the necessary motor abilities for independent walking.

This review included five trials involving children under six years of age with, or at risk for, neuromotor delay. The findings suggest that treadmill training may help children with Down syndrome to walk earlier than they would without the intervention. However, for children with cerebral palsy and for pre-term infants, the evidence is not clear due to a lack of studies and differences in their design and focus. This makes it difficult to draw conclusions about treadmill interventions. Further investigation of the effects of treadmill training on children under six years of age, particularly pre-term infants and children with cerebral palsy, is essential in order to determine whether it can accelerate the onset of walking and improve motor development.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Intervenciones con cintas de correr con apoyo parcial del peso corporal en niños menores de seis años de edad con riesgo de retraso neuromotor

Antecedentes

En los niños con síndrome de Down, parálisis cerebral o nacidos prematuramente puede ocurrir retraso en el desarrollo motor, lo que a su vez puede limitar las oportunidades del niño de explorar el ambiente. La bibliografía sobre neurofisiología e intervenciones precoces indica que el entrenamiento en tareas específicas facilita el desarrollo motor. La intervención con cintas de correr es un buen ejemplo de entrenamiento locomotor en tareas específicas.

Objetivos

Evaluar la efectividad de la intervención con cintas de correr sobre el desarrollo locomotor en lactantes y niños menores de seis años de edad preambulatorios que tienen riesgo de retraso neuromotor.

Métodos de búsqueda

En marzo 2011 se hicieron búsquedas en CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, número 1), MEDLINE (1948 hasta marzo, semana 2, 2011), EMBASE (1980 hasta semana 11, 2011), PsycINFO (1887 hasta la actualidad), CINAHL (1937 hasta la actualidad), Science Citation Index (1970 hasta el 19 marzo 2011), PEDro (hasta el 7 marzo 2011), CPCI-S (1990 hasta 19 marzo 2011) y en LILACS (hasta marzo 2011). También se hicieron búsquedas en ICTRP, ClinicalTrials.gov, mRCT y en CenterWatch.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios, ensayos controlados cuasialeatorios y ensayos clínicos controlados que evaluaron el efecto de la intervención con cintas de correr en niños de hasta seis años de edad con retraso en el desarrollo de la marcha o en lograr la marcha independiente o que tienen riesgo de retraso neuromotor.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Cuatro autores extrajeron los datos de forma independiente utilizando formularios estandarizados. Los parámetros de resultado se estructuraron según los componentes "Funciones corporales" y "Actividad y participación" de la versión de la International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children & Youth (ICFCY) desarrollada por la Organización Mundial de la Salud.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron cinco estudios que informaron la intervención con cintas de correr en 139 niños. De los 139 niños, 73 se asignaron a grupos de intervención con cintas de correr y los otros niños sirvieron como controles. Los estudios variaron en el tipo de población estudiada (niños con síndrome de Down, parálisis cerebral o con riesgo de retraso neuromotor); el tipo de comparación (por ejemplo, intervención con cintas de correr versus ninguna intervención, intervención con cintas de correr de alta intensidad versus de baja intensidad); el momento de la evaluación (durante la intervención o a diversos intervalos después de la intervención), y los parámetros evaluados. Debido a la diversidad de los estudios, solamente fue posible utilizar los datos de tres estudios en los metanálisis y éstos se limitaron a dos resultados: edad de inicio de la marcha independiente y la función motora gruesa.

Las pruebas indicaron que la intervención con cintas de correr podría dar lugar a un inicio más temprano de la marcha independiente en comparación con ninguna intervención con cintas de correr (dos estudios; estimación del efecto -1,47; intervalo de confianza (IC) del 95%: -2,97; 0,03), aunque estos ensayos estudiaron dos poblaciones diferentes y al parecer, los niños con síndrome de Down se beneficiaron, mientras que no estuvo claro si ocurrió igual en los niños con alto riesgo de discapacidades neuromotoras. Otros dos estudios, ambos en niños con síndrome de Down, compararon diferentes tipos de intervención con cintas de correr: uno comparó intervención con cintas de correr con y sin ortosis, mientras el otro comparó intervención con cintas de correr de alta intensidad versus baja intensidad. Ninguno fue concluyente con respecto a la repercusión de estos diferentes protocolos sobre la edad a la cual los niños comenzaron a caminar.

No hay pruebas suficientes para determinar si la intervención con cintas de correr mejora la función motora gruesa (dos estudios; estimación del efecto 0,88; IC del 95%: -4,54, 6,30). En un estudio que evaluó la intervención con cintas de correr con y sin ortosis, los resultados indicaron que el agregado de ortosis podría obstaculizar el progreso motor grueso (estimación del efecto -8,40; IC del 95%: -14,55, -2,25).

Un estudio en niños con síndrome de Down midió la edad de inicio de la marcha con ayuda e informó que los que recibieron la intervención con cintas de correr fueron capaces de caminar con ayuda antes que los que no recibieron la intervención (estimación del efecto -74,00; IC del 95%: -135,40, -12,60). Otro estudio que comparó la intervención con cintas de correr de alta intensidad y de baja intensidad no pudo concluir si una fue más efectiva que la otra para ayudar a los niños a lograr caminar con apoyo a una edad más temprana (estimación del efecto -1,86; IC del 95%: -4,09, 0,37).

Un estudio en niños con alto riesgo de discapacidades neuromotoras evaluó la calidad de la marcha y encontró un efecto beneficioso estadísticamente significativo de la intervención con cintas de correr en comparación con ninguna intervención con cintas de correr (estimación del efecto a los 16 meses de edad: -15,61; IC del 95%: -23,96; -7,27), pero no fue capaz de concluir si hubo un efecto beneficioso del entrenamiento con cintas de correr sobre la frecuencia del paso a la misma edad (estimación del efecto a los 16 meses de edad: 4,36; IC del 95%: -2,63, 11,35). La frecuencia del paso también se evaluó en niños con síndrome de Down en otro estudio y los que recibieron entrenamiento con cintas de correr de alta intensidad, en lugar de entrenamiento con cintas de correr de baja intensidad, mostraron un aumento en el número de pasos alternos (estimación del efecto 11,00; IC del 95%: 6,03, 15,97).

El otro resultado primario de esta revisión, caídas y lesiones debido a las caídas, no se midió en los estudios incluidos.

Conclusiones de los autores

La revisión actual solamente proporciona pruebas limitadas de la efectividad de la intervención con cintas de correr en niños de hasta seis años de edad. Pocos estudios han evaluado las intervenciones con cintas de correr en niños pequeños con el uso de un grupo control apropiado (que sería tratamiento habitual o ningún tratamiento). Las pruebas disponibles indican que la intervención con cintas de correr puede acelerar el desarrollo de la marcha independiente en los niños con síndrome de Down. Se necesitan estudios de investigación adicionales para confirmar lo anterior y también se debe considerar si la intervención intensiva con cintas de correr puede acelerar el inicio de la marcha en los niños pequeños con parálisis cerebral y en los lactantes con alto riesgo, y si la intervención con cintas de correr tiene un efecto general sobre el desarrollo motor grueso en los diversos subgrupos de niños pequeños con riesgo de retraso del desarrollo.

 

Resumen en términos sencillos

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Intervenciones con cintas de correr con apoyo parcial del peso corporal en niños menores de seis años de edad con riesgo de retraso neuromotor

Intervenciones con cintas de correr con apoyo parcial del peso corporal en niños menores de seis años de edad con riesgo de retraso neuromotor

Los niños con un diagnóstico de síndrome de Down o parálisis cerebral, o que son prematuros, pueden presentar retraso en su desarrollo motor. Los retrasos en el desarrollo motor limitan la capacidad del niño de moverse y lograr hitos motores como caminar, correr y saltar. Con frecuencia, ayudar a los niños a caminar es el centro de la intervención terapéutica. Existe un corpus bibliográfico que indica que la mejor manera de hacerlo es conseguir que el niño practique dar pasos con un apoyo apropiado. El entrenamiento con cintas de correr, en el cual el niño es apoyado por un arnés, brinda una oportunidad a los niños para caminar con apoyo por períodos suficientemente largos para adquirir las habilidades motoras necesarias para la marcha independiente.

Esta revisión incluyó cinco ensayos con niños menores de seis años de edad con, o en riesgo de, retraso neuromotor. Los hallazgos indican que el entrenamiento con cintas de correr puede ayudar a los niños con síndrome de Down a caminar antes, en comparación con no recibir la intervención. Sin embargo, en los niños con parálisis cerebral y en los neonatos prematuros, las pruebas no están claras debido a la falta de estudios y a las diferencias en su diseño y objetivo. Lo anterior dificulta establecer conclusiones acerca de las intervenciones con cintas de correr. Son fundamentales los estudios de investigación adicionales de los efectos del entrenamiento con cintas de correr en los niños menores de seis años de edad, en particular, los neonatos prematuros y los niños con parálisis cerebral, para determinar si puede acelerar el inicio de la marcha y mejorar el desarrollo motor.

Notas de traducción

Traducido por: Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano
Traducción patrocinada por: No especificada

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Contexte

Un retard de développement moteur peut apparaître chez les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down, une infirmité motrice cérébrale ou chez les enfants nés avant terme, qui peut en retour limiter les opportunités de l’enfant à explorer l’environnement. Les documentations sur une intervention neurophysiologique précoce suggèrent qu'un entraînement spécifique facilite le développement moteur. L’intervention sur tapis roulant est un bon exemple de l’entraînement spécifique de la fonction locomotrice.

Objectifs

Evaluer l’efficacité de l’intervention sur tapis roulant sur le développement locomoteur chez les enfants qui ne sont pas encore en âge de marcher et les enfants de moins de six ans qui ont un risque de retard neuromoteur.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En mars 2011, nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 1), MEDLINE ( 1948 à la semaine 2 de mars 2011), EMBASE (1980 à la semaine 11 2011), PsycINFO (1887 à aujourd’hui), CINAHL (1937 à aujourd’hui), Science Citation Index (1970 au 19 mars 2011), PEDro (jusqu’au 7 mars 2011), CPCI-S (1990 au 19 mars 2011) et LILACS (jusqu’en mars 2011). Nous avons également fait des recherches dans ICTRP, ClinicalTrials.gov mRCT et CenterWatch

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés, quasi-randomisés et des essais cliniques contrôlés qui ont évalué l’effet d’une intervention sur tapis roulant chez les enfants âgés de moins de six ans avec des retards du développement de la marche ou l’acquisition d’une marche indépendante ou qui avaient un risque de retard neuromoteur.

Recueil et analyse des données

Quatre auteurs ont extrait les données, de façon indépendante, en utilisant des formulaires standardisés. Les paramètres de résultats ont été structurés selon les composantes "fonctions du corps" et "activité et participation" de l’ICFCY (Classification Internationale du Fonctionnement, du handicap & de la santé, pour enfants et adolescents), développée par l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus cinq études qui traitaient d'une intervention sur tapis roulant sur 139 enfants. Sur les 139 enfants, 73 ont été assignés aux groupes avec intervention sur tapis roulant alors que les autres enfants ont servi de témoins. Les études variaient dans le type de population étudiée (enfants avec le syndrome de Down, une infirmité motrice cérébrale ou qui avaient un risque de retard neuromoteur) ; le type de comparaison (par exemple, tapis roulant par rapport à aucune intervention, tapis roulant avec une intensité élevée par rapport à une intensité faible) ; la durée de l'évaluation (au cours de l'intervention ou à différents intervalles après l'intervention) et les paramètres évalués. En raison de la diversité des études, nous n’avons pas pu utiliser les données de trois études dans des méta-analyses et ces dernières ont été limitées à deux résultats : l’âge de l’acquisition de la marche indépendante et la fonction motrice globale.

Les preuves ont suggéré qu’une intervention avec tapis roulant pouvait entraîner une acquisition plus précoce de la marche indépendante par rapport à l’absence d’ intervention avec tapis roulant (deux études ; estimation de l’effet -1,47 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %) : -2,97, 0,03), bien que ces essais étudiaient deux populations différentes et que les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down semblaient en tirer profit alors que cela était moins évident chez les enfants ayant un risque élevé de handicap neuromoteur. Deux autres études, toutes deux portant sur les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down, ont comparé des types différents d’interventions avec tapis roulant : une comparait une intervention avec tapis roulant avec et sans orthèse, et l’autre comparait une intensité élevée et une intensité faible de l’intervention avec tapis roulant. Aucune ne s'est révélée concluante en termes d'impact de ces différents protocoles sur l'âge auquel les enfants ont commencé à marcher.

Il n’y a pas de preuves suffisantes permettant de déterminer si une intervention avec tapis roulant améliore la fonction motrice globale (deux études ; estimation de l’effet 0,88 ; IC à 95 % : . -4,54, 6,30). Dans l’étude évaluant le tapis roulant avec ou sans orthèse, les résultats suggéraient que l’ajout d’une orthèse pouvait entraver la progression de la fonction motrice globale (estimation de l’effet -8,40 ; IC à 95 % : -14,55, -2,25).

Une étude sur les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down a mesuré l’âge de l’apparition de la marche avec assistance et a signalé que les enfants qui ont reçu une intervention avec tapis roulant étaient capables de marcher avec une assistance plus tôt que ceux qui n’en avaient pas reçu (estimation de l’effet -74,00 ; IC à 95 % : -135,40, -12,60). Une autre étude comparant une intensité élevée et une intensité faible sur le tapis roulant n’a pas pu conclure si l’une était plus efficace que l’autre pour aider les enfants à atteindre une marche assistée à un âge plus précoce (estimation de l'effet -1,86 ; IC à 95 % : -4,09, 0,37).

Une étude portant sur les enfants avec un risque élevé de handicap neuromoteur a évalué la qualité des pas et a découvert un avantage significatif en termes statistiques de l'intervention avec tapis roulant par rapport à l’absence intervention avec tapis roulant (estimation de l'effet à 16 mois : -15,61 ; IC à 95 % : -23,96, - 7,27), mais elle n’a pas pu conclure s’il y avait un effet bénéfique de l’entraînement sur tapis roulant sur la fréquence des pas au même âge (estimation de l’effet à 16 mois : 4,36 ; IC à 95 % : -2,63, 11,35). La fréquence des pas a également été évaluée chez les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down dans une autre étude et ceux qui recevaient un entraînement sur tapis roulant avec une intensité plus élevée par rapport à une intensité plus faible ont démontré un nombre accru de pas alternatifs (estimation de l’effet 11,00 ; IC à 95 % : 6,03, 15,97).

Nos autres résultats primaires, les chutes et les blessures dues aux chutes n’ont été mesurés dans aucune des études incluses

Conclusions des auteurs

La revue actuelle a seulement fourni des preuves limitées de l’efficacité d’une intervention avec tapis rouant sur les enfants de moins de six ans. Peu d’études ont évalué les interventions avec tapis roulant chez les jeunes enfants en utilisant un groupe témoin approprié (qui serait sous traitement habituel ou aucun traitement). Les preuves disponibles indiquent que l’intervention avec tapis roulant peut accélérer le développement de la marche indépendante chez les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down. Des recherches complémentaires sont nécessaires pour confirmer ces faits, il faudrait également étudier si une intervention intensive avec tapis roulant peuvent accélérer l’acquisition de la marche chez les jeunes enfants avec une infirmité motrice cérébrale et chez les enfants à risque, et étudier si les interventions avec tapis roulant ont un effet général sur le développement moteur global dans les différents sous-groupes de jeunes enfants ayant un risque de retard du développement.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Interventions sur tapis roulant avec soutien partiel du poids du corps chez les enfants de moins de six ans avec risque de retard neuromoteur

Les enfants chez qui il a été établi un diagnostic du syndrome de Down ou d’infirmité motrice cérébrale, ou qui sont nés avant terme, peuvent avoir un retard de leur développement moteur. Les retards du développement moteur limitent la capacité des enfants à se déplacer ou atteindre des objectifs moteurs comme la marche, la course ou le saut. Aider les enfants à marcher est souvent l’objectif d’une intervention thérapeutique. Des documents suggèrent que le meilleur moyen d’y parvenir est d’amener l’enfant à s’entraîner à marcher avec le soutien approprié. L’entraînement sur tapis roulant, sur lequel l’enfant est soutenu par un harnais, offre une opportunité aux enfants de marcher avec une assistance durant des périodes suffisamment longues pour acquérir les capacités motrices nécessaires pour marcher seuls.

Cette revue incluait cinq essais impliquant des enfants de moins de six ans avec, ou ayant des risques de, retard neuromoteur. Les conclusions suggèrent que l’entraînement sur tapis roulant peut aider les enfants atteints du syndrome de Down à marcher plus tôt qu'ils ne l'auraient fait sans l'intervention. Toutefois, pour les enfants avec une infirmité motrice cérébrale et les enfants nés avant terme, les conclusions ne sont pas claires en raison du manque d’études et des différences dans leur conception et leur objectif. Il est donc difficile de tirer des conclusions sur les interventions sur tapis roulant. Des investigations complémentaires, concernant les effets de l’entraînement sur tapis roulant chez les enfants de moins de six ans, en particulier les enfants nés avant terme et les enfants avec une infirmité motrice cérébrale, sont essentielles pour déterminer s’il peut accélérer l’acquisition de la marche et améliorer le développement moteur.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français