Overview of Reviews

You have free access to this content

An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes

  1. Gerd Flodgren2,
  2. Martin P Eccles1,*,
  3. Sasha Shepperd3,
  4. Anthony Scott4,
  5. Elena Parmelli5,
  6. Fiona R Beyer6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 DEC 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009255


How to Cite

Flodgren G, Eccles MP, Shepperd S, Scott A, Parmelli E, Beyer FR. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009255. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009255.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  2. 2

    University of Oxford, Department of Public Health, Headington, Oxford, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, Department of Public Health, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  4. 4

    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Carlton, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

  5. 5

    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Diseases, Modena, Italy

  6. 6

    University of York, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, York, UK

*Martin P Eccles, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Badiley Clark Building, Richardson Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK. Martin.Eccles@newcastle.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals' behaviour and patient outcomes.

Objectives

To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes.

Methods

We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each review according to the AMSTAR criteria. We included systematic reviews of studies evaluating the effectiveness of any type of financial incentive. We grouped financial incentives into five groups: payment for working for a specified time period; payment for each service, episode or visit; payment for providing care for a patient or specific population; payment for providing a pre-specified level or providing a change in activity or quality of care; and mixed or other systems. We summarised data using vote counting.

Main results

We identified four reviews reporting on 32 studies. Two reviews scored 7 on the AMSTAR criteria (moderate, score 5 to 7, quality) and two scored 9 (high, score 8 to 11, quality). The reported quality of the included studies was, by a variety of methods, low to moderate. Payment for working for a specified time period was generally ineffective, improving 3/11 outcomes from one study reported in one review. Payment for each service, episode or visit was generally effective, improving 7/10 outcomes from five studies reported in three reviews; payment for providing care for a patient or specific population was generally effective, improving 48/69 outcomes from 13 studies reported in two reviews; payment for providing a pre-specified level or providing a change in activity or quality of care was generally effective, improving 17/20 reported outcomes from 10 studies reported in two reviews; and mixed and other systems were of mixed effectiveness, improving 20/31 reported outcomes from seven studies reported in three reviews. When looking at the effect of financial incentives overall across categories of outcomes, they were of mixed effectiveness on consultation or visit rates (improving 10/17 outcomes from three studies in two reviews); generally effective in improving processes of care (improving 41/57 outcomes from 19 studies in three reviews); generally effective in improving referrals and admissions (improving 11/16 outcomes from 11 studies in four reviews); generally ineffective in improving compliance with guidelines outcomes (improving 5/17 outcomes from five studies in two reviews); and generally effective in improving prescribing costs outcomes (improving 28/34 outcomes from 10 studies in one review).

Authors' conclusions

Financial incentives may be effective in changing healthcare professional practice. The evidence has serious methodological limitations and is also very limited in its completeness and generalisability. We found no evidence from reviews that examined the effect of financial incentives on patient outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

How good are financial incentives in changing health care?

There is a lot of interest in how well financial incentives influence the delivery of health care. Financial incentives are extrinsic sources of motivation and they exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are several reviews describing the effects of different types of financial incentives, it is important to bring this together in an overview to examine which are best at changing healthcare professionals' behaviours and what happens to patients. We therefore conducted an overview of systematic reviews that evaluated the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched a wide range of electronic databases from when they started up to December 2008. We included systematic reviews of studies evaluating the effectiveness of any type of financial incentive. We grouped financial incentives into five groups: payment for working for a specified time period; payment for each service, episode or visit; payment for providing care for a patient or specific population; payment for providing a pre-specified level or providing a change in activity or quality of care; and mixed or other systems. We summarised data using vote counting. We identified four reviews reporting on 32 studies. Two reviews were of moderate quality and two were of high quality. The studies that the reviews reported on were of low to moderate quality. Payment for working for a specified time period was generally ineffective. Payment for each service, episode or visit was generally effective, as were payment for providing care for a patient or specific population and payment for providing a pre-specified level or providing a change in activity or quality of care; mixed and other systems were of mixed effectiveness. When looking at the effect of financial incentives overall across different outcomes, they were of mixed effectiveness on consultation or visit rates; generally effective in improving processes of care, referrals and admissions, and prescribing costs; and generally ineffective in improving compliance with guidelines outcomes. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that financial incentives may be effective in changing healthcare professional practice. The evidence has serious methodological limitations and is also very limited in its completeness and generalisability. We found no evidence that financial incentives can improve patient outcomes.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Resumen de las revisiones que evalúan la efectividad de los incentivos económicos en el cambio de la conducta de los profesionales sanitarios y los resultados de los pacientes

Hay considerable interés en la efectividad de los incentivos económicos para la asistencia sanitaria. Los incentivos pueden utilizarse en un intento por aumentar el uso de los tratamientos basados en la evidencia entre los profesionales sanitarios o para estimular a los profesionales de la salud a cambiar su conducta clínica con respecto a las decisiones preventivas, de diagnóstico y de tratamiento, o ambas. Los incentivos económicos son una fuente extrínseca de motivación y existen cuando un individuo puede esperar una transferencia monetaria que se hace condicional a que actúe de una forma particular. Como se han realizado numerosas revisiones dentro del área de la asistencia sanitaria que describen los efectos de varios tipos de incentivos económicos, es importante resumir su efectividad para discernir cuáles son las más efectivas para el cambio de conducta de los profesionales sanitarios y los resultados de los pacientes.

Objetivos

Realizar un resumen de las revisiones sistemáticas que evalúe la repercusión de los incentivos económicos sobre la conducta de los profesionales sanitarios y los resultados de los pacientes.

Estrategia de búsqueda

 

Criterios de selección

 

Obtención y análisis de los datos

 

Resultados principales

Se identificaron cuatro revisiones que informaron sobre 32 estudios. Dos revisiones tuvieron una calificación de 7 según los criterios de AMSTAR (calidad moderada, puntuación 5 a 7) y en dos la calificación fue 9 (calidad alta, puntuación 8 a 11). Con el uso de varios métodos, la calidad informada de los estudios incluidos fue de baja a moderada. El pago por el trabajo durante un período específico generalmente fue inefectivo y mejoró 3/11 resultados en un estudio informado en una revisión. El pago por cada servicio, episodio o visita generalmente fue efectivo y mejoró 7/10 resultados en cinco estudios informados en tres revisiones; El pago por proporcionar atención a un paciente o una población específica generalmente fue efectivo y mejoró 48/69 resultados en 13 estudios informados en dos revisiones; El pago por proporcionar un nivel preespecificado o proporcionar un cambio en la actividad o la calidad de la atención generalmente fue efectivo y mejoró 17/20 resultados informados en diez estudios informados en dos revisiones; y los sistemas mixtos u otros sistemas fueron de efectividad mixta y mejoraron 20/31 resultados informados en siete estudios informados en tres revisiones. Cuando se examinó el efecto de los incentivos económicos en general a través de categorías de resultados fueron de efectividad mixta con respecto a las tasa de consulta o visita (mejoraron 10/17 resultados en tres estudios en dos revisiones); generalmente fueron efectivos para mejorar los procesos de atención (mejoraron 41/57 resultados en 19 estudios en tres revisiones); generalmente fueron efectivos para mejorar las derivaciones y los ingresos (mejoraron 11/16 resultados en 11 estudios en cuatro revisiones); generalmente fueron inefectivos para mejorar los resultados del cumplimiento de las guías (mejoraron 5/17 resultados en cinco estudios en dos revisiones); y generalmente fueron efectivos para mejorar los resultados de costos de prescripción (mejoraron 28/34 resultados en diez estudios en una revisión).

Conclusiones de los autores

Los incentivos económicos pueden ser efectivos para cambiar la práctica de los profesionales sanitarios. Las pruebas tienen limitaciones metodológicas serias y también son muy limitadas en cuanto a su completitud y su generalizabilidad. No se hallaron pruebas de revisiones que examinaran el efecto de los incentivos económicos sobre los resultados de los pacientes.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Revue de la littérature évaluant l'efficacité des incitations financières pour modifier les comportements du personnel soignant et l'état de santé des patients

Contexte

L'efficacité des incitations financières dans les prestations de soins revêt un intérêt considérable. Les incitations peuvent être utilisées pour tenter d'augmenter l'utilisation des traitements fondés sur des preuves parmi les professionnels de la santé ou pour stimuler les professionnels de la santé pour qu'ils modifient leur comportement clinique en ce qui concerne les décisions en matière de prévention, de diagnostic et de traitement, ou les deux. Les incitations financières sont une source de motivation extérieure qui existe lorsqu'un individu peut espérer un virement d'argent qui est conditionné par un comportement particulier. Puisqu'il existe de nombreuses revues effectuées dans le secteur de la santé décrivant l'effet de différents types d'incitations financières, il est important de résumer leur efficacité dans une vue d'ensemble afin de distinguer celles qui sont le plus efficaces pour modifier le comportement du personnel soignant et l'état des patients.

Objectifs

Effectuer une vue d'ensemble des revues systématiques qui évalue l'impact des incitations financières sur le comportement du personnel soignant et l'état des patients.

Méthodes

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la base des revues systématiques Cochrane (CDSR) (La Cochrane Library) ; la base de données des résumés de revues d'efficacité (DARE) ; TRIP ; MEDLINE ; EMBASE ; Science Citation Index ; Social Science Citation Index ; NHS EED ; HEED ; EconLit ; et dans Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (depuis la date de leur création jusqu'au mois de janvier 2010). Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les listes bibliographiques de toutes les revues incluses et réalisé une recherche des références dans les articles qui citaient des études incluses dans la revue. Nous avons inclus des revues aussi bien Cochrane que non-Cochrane des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), des essais cliniques comparatifs (ECC), des séries temporelles interrompues (STI) et des études comparatives avant-après qui évaluaient l'effet des incitations financières sur la pratique du personnel soignant et l'état des patients, et qui rapportaient les résultats numériques des études individuelles incluses. Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait de façon indépendante les données et évalué la qualité méthodologique de chaque revue conformément aux critères AMSTAR. Nous avons inclus les revues systématiques des études évaluant l'efficacité d'un type quelconque d'incitations financières. Nous avons regroupé les incitations financières dans cinq groupes : rémunération pour assurer une période de travail spécifiée ; rémunération pour chaque service, épisode ou visite ; rémunération pour des prestations de soins pour un patient ou une population spécifique ; rémunération pour assurer un niveau pré-spécifié ou pour assurer un changement dans l'activité ou de la qualité des soins ; et les régimes incitatifs mixtes ou d'autres systèmes. Nous avons résumé les données par recensement des suffrages.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié quatre revues ayant examiné 32 études. Deux revues ont été notées avec un score 7 d'après les critères AMSTAR (qualité moyenne, score 5 à 7) et deux avec un score 9 (grande qualité, score 8 à 11). La qualité rapportée des études incluses allait, d'après différentes méthodes, de faible à moyenne. La rémunération pour assurer une période de travail spécifiée était globalement inefficace, améliorant 3/11 résultats dans une étude examinée dans une revue. La rémunération pour chaque service, épisode ou visite était globalement efficace, améliorant 7/10 résultats dans cinq études examinées dans trois revues ; la rémunération pour des prestations de soins pour un patient ou une population spécifique était globalement efficace, améliorant 48/69 résultats dans 13 études examinées dans deux revues ; la rémunération pour assurer un niveau pré-spécifié ou pour assurer un changement dans l'activité ou de la qualité des soins était globalement efficace, améliorant 17/20 résultats signalés dans 10 études examinées dans deux revues ; et les régimes incitatifs mixtes et d'autres systèmes avaient une efficacité mitigée, améliorant 20/31 résultats signalés dans sept études examinées dans trois revues. L'examen de l'effet des incitations financières globalement à travers les catégories de résultats révèle qu'elles avaient une efficacité mitigée sur la consultation ou le taux de visites (améliorant 10/17 résultats dans trois études dans deux revues) ; qu'elles étaient globalement efficaces pour améliorer les processus des soins (améliorant 41/57 résultats dans 19 études dans trois revues), globalement efficaces pour améliorer les orientations et les admissions (améliorant 11/16 résultats dans 11 études dans quatre revues) ; globalement inefficaces pour améliorer la conformité aux critères de jugement des directives (améliorant 5/17 résultats dans cinq études dans deux revues) ; et globalement efficaces pour améliorer les résultats des coûts des prescriptions (améliorant 28/34 résultats dans 10 études dans une revue).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les incitations financières peuvent être efficaces pour modifier la pratique du personnel soignant. Les preuves comportent de sérieuses limitations méthodologiques et présentent aussi un caractère complet et une possibilité de généralisation très limités. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves dans les revues qui avaient examiné l'effet des incitations financières sur l'état des patients.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Revue de la littérature évaluant l'efficacité des incitations financières pour modifier les comportements du personnel soignant et l'état de santé des patients

Les incitations financières sont-elles efficaces pour modifier les soins de santé ?

Il est très intéressant de déterminer à quel point les incitations financières influencent la qualité des prestations de soins. Les incitations financières sont des sources de motivation extérieures qui existent lorsque les actions d'un individu sont conditionnées par une contrepartie financière. Puisqu'il existe plusieurs revues décrivant l'effet de différents types d'incitations financières, il est important de les rassembler dans une revue de la littérature, afin d'examiner celles qui traitent le mieux du changement de comportement du personnel soignant et de la situation des patients. Nous avons donc effectué une synthèse des revues systématiques évaluant l'impact des incitations financières sur le comportement du personnel soignant et l'état des patients. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans plusieurs bases de données électroniques, depuis leur origine jusqu'au mois de décembre 2008. Nous avons inclus les revues systématiques des études évaluant l'efficacité de tout type d'incitations financières. Nous avons regroupé les incitations financières dans cinq groupes : rémunération pour assurer une période de travail spécifiée ; rémunération pour chaque service, épisode ou visite ; rémunération pour des prestations de soins pour un patient ou une population spécifique ; rémunération pour assurer un niveau pré-spécifique ou pour assurer un changement dans l'activité ou de la qualité des soins ; et les régimes incitatifs mixtes ou d'autres systèmes. Nous avons résumé les données par recensement des suffrages. Nous avons identifié quatre revues ayant examiné 32 études. Deux revues étaient de qualité moyenne et deux de qualité élevée. Les études examinées dans les revues variaient d'une qualité faible à moyenne. La rémunération pour assurer une période de travail spécifiée était globalement inefficace. La rémunération pour chaque service, épisode ou visite était globalement efficace, tout comme l'étaient la rémunération pour des prestations de soins pour un patient ou une population spécifique et la rémunération pour assurer un niveau pré-spécifié ou pour assurer un changement dans l'activité ou de la qualité des soins ; les régimes incitatifs mixtes ou d'autres systèmes avaient une efficacité mitigée. Globalement, les résultats des différentes études sur l'effet des incitations ont démontré qu'elles avaient une efficacité controversée (relative) sur la consultation ou le taux de visites ; qu'elles étaient globalement efficaces pour améliorer les processus des soins, les orientations et les admissions, et les coûts des prescriptions ; et globalement inefficaces pour garantir la conformité avec les recommandations. En nous appuyant sur ces résultats, nous en avons conclu que les incitations financières peuvent être efficaces pour modifier la pratique du personnel soignant. Les preuves regorgent d’importantes limitations méthodologiques, semblent incomplètes et peu généralisées. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve indiquant que les incitations financières peuvent améliorer l'état des patients.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 21st August, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français