This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (3 DEC 2014)

Intervention Review

Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users

  1. Jan Klimas1,2,*,
  2. Catherine-Anne Field2,
  3. Walter Cullen1,3,
  4. Clodagh SM O'Gorman1,3,
  5. Liam G Glynn4,
  6. Eamon Keenan5,
  7. Jean Saunders6,
  8. Gerard Bury2,
  9. Colum Dunne1,3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group

Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009269.pub2


How to Cite

Klimas J, Field CA, Cullen W, O'Gorman CSM, Glynn LG, Keenan E, Saunders J, Bury G, Dunne C. Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD009269. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009269.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Graduate Entry Medical School, Limerick, Ireland

  2. 2

    School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 3

    Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (4i), Limerick, Ireland

  4. 4

    National University of Ireland, Department of General Practice, Galway, Ireland

  5. 5

    Health Service Executive, Addiction Services, Dublin, Ireland

  6. 6

    Graduate Entry Medical School, University of Limerick, Statistical Consulting Unit/ Applied Biostatistics Consulting Centre /CSTAR, Limerick, Ireland

*Jan Klimas, jan.klimas@ucd.ie.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (03 DEC 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Problem alcohol use is common among illicit drug users and is associated with adverse health outcomes. It is also an important factor in poor prognosis among drug users with hepatitis C virus (HCV) as it impacts on progression to hepatic cirrhosis or opiate overdose in opioid users.

Objectives

To assess the effects of psychosocial interventions for problem alcohol use in illicit drug users (principally problem drug users of opiates and stimulants).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group trials register (November 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 11, November 2011), PUBMED (1966 to 2011); EMBASE (1974 to 2011); CINAHL (1982 to 2011); PsycINFO (1872 to 2011) and reference list of articles. We also searched: 1) conference proceedings (online archives only) of the Society for the Study of Addiction (SSA), International Harm Reduction Association (IHRA), International Conference on Alcohol Harm Reduction (ICAHR), and American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (AATOD); 2) online registers of clinical trials, Current Controlled Trials (CCT), Clinical Trials.org, Center Watch and International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing psychosocial interventions with another therapy (other psychosocial treatment, including non-pharmacological therapies or placebo) in adult (over the age of 18 years) illicit drug users with concurrent problem alcohol use.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data from included trials.

Main results

Four studies, 594 participants, were included. Half of the trials were rated as having high or unclear risk of bias. They considered six different psychosocial interventions grouped into four comparisons: (1) cognitive-behavioural coping skills training versus 12-step facilitation (N = 41), (2) brief intervention versus treatment as usual (N = 110), (3) hepatitis health promotion versus motivational interviewing (N = 256), and (4) brief motivational intervention versus assessment-only group (N = 187). Differences between studies precluded any pooling of data. Findings are described for each trial individually:

comparison 1: no significant difference; comparison 2: higher rates of decreased alcohol use at three months (risk ratio (RR) 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.54) and nine months (RR 0.16; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.33) in the treatment as usual group; comparison 3 (group and individual format): no significant difference; comparison 4: more people reduced alcohol use (by seven or more days in the past 30 days at 6 months) in the brief motivational intervention compared to controls (RR 1.67; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.60).

Authors' conclusions

Very little evidence exists that there is no difference in the effectiveness between different types of interventions and that brief interventions are not superior to assessment only or treatment as usual. No conclusion can be made because of the paucity of the data and the low quality of the retrieved studies.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Which talking therapies (counselling) work for drug users with alcohol problems?

What is problem alcohol use and what are psychosocial interventions?

Problematic use of alcohol means drinking above the recommended safe drinking limits. It can lead to serious alcohol problems or dependence. Excessive drinking in people who have problems with other drugs is common and often makes their problems worse as well as having serious health consequences for the person involved.

Psychosocial interventions are talking therapies that aim to identify an alcohol problem and motivate an individual to do something about it. They can be performed by staff with training in these approaches, for example doctor, nurse, counsellor, psychologist, etc. Talking therapies may help people cut down their drinking but the impact is not known in people who have problems with other drugs.

We wanted to do a review to see whether talking therapies have an impact on alcohol problems in drug users. In this review, we wanted to evaluate information from randomised trials in relation to the impact of talking therapies on alcohol drinking in adult (over the age of 18 years) users of illicit drugs (mainly opiates and stimulants).

This review found the following studies, and came to the following conclusions:

We found four studies that examined 594 people with drug problems. One study looked at cognitive-behavioural coping skills training versus 12-step facilitation. One study looked at brief intervention versus treatment as usual. One study looked at motivational interviewing (group and individual format) versus hepatitis health promotion. The last study looked at brief motivational intervention versus assessment only.

- The studies were so different that we could not combine their results to answer our question.

- It remains uncertain whether talking therapies affect drinking in people who have problems with other drugs because of the low quality of the evidence.

- It remains uncertain whether talking therapies for drinking affect illicit drug use in people who have problems with other drugs. There was not enough information to compare different types of talking therapies.

- Many of the studies did not account for possible sources of bias.

- More high-quality studies, such as randomised controlled trials, are needed to answer our question.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales pour réduire la consommation d'alcool chez les usagers de drogues ayant également un problème d'alcool

Contexte

La consommation excessive d'alcool est fréquente chez les usagers de drogues et est associée à des risques pour la santé. C'est également un facteur important de pronostic défavorable chez les toxicomanes atteints d'hépatite C (VHC) car cela favorise l'évolution vers une cirrhose hépatique ou une overdose d'opiacés chez les usagers d'opioïdes.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions psychosociales pour les problèmes d'alcool chez les usagers de drogues (principalement d'opiacés et de stimulants).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur les drogues et l'alcool (novembre 2011), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, numéro 11, novembre 2011), PUBMED (de 1966 à 2011) ; EMBASE (de 1974 à 2011) ; CINAHL (de 1982 à 2011) ; PsycINFO (de 1872 à 2011) et dans les listes bibliographiques des articles. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans : 1) les comptes-rendus de conférences (archives disponibles en ligne uniquement) de la Society for the Study of Addiction (SSA), de l'International Harm Reduction Association (IHRA), de l'International Conference on Alcohol Harm Reduction (ICAHR), et de l'American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (AATOD) ; 2) les registres en ligne d'essais cliniques, les essais contrôlés en cours (CCT), Clinical Trials.org, le Center Watch et l'International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés comparant les interventions psychosociales à un autre traitement (autre traitement psychosocial, y compris traitements non-pharmacologiques ou par placebo) chez des usagers de drogues adultes (plus de 18 ans) ayant également des problèmes d'alcool.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué le risque de biais et extrait des données issues des essais inclus.

Résultats Principaux

Quatre études, soit 594 participants, ont été inclus. La moitié des essais ont été classés comme ayant un risque de biais élevé ou indéterminé. Ils ont étudié six interventions psychosociales différentes, regroupées en quatre comparaisons : (1) apprentissage de stratégies d'adaptation cognitive-comportementale vs approche en 12 étapes (« 12 step facilitation ») (N = 41), (2) intervention brève vs traitement classique (N = 110), (3) information en matière d'hépatite vs entretien motivationnel (N = 256), et (4) brève intervention motivationnelle vs groupe avec évaluation uniquement (N = 187). Les différences entre les études n'ont pas permis d'agréger les données. Les résultats sont décrits pour chacun des essais, individuellement.

comparaison 1 : pas de différence significative ; comparaison 2 : taux plus élevés de réduction de la consommation d'alcool à 3 mois (risque relatif (RR) 0,32 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,19 à 0,54) et à 9 mois (RR 0,16 ; IC à 95 % de 0,08 à 0,33) dans le groupe sous traitement classique ; comparaison 3 (en groupe et individuel) : pas de différence significative ; comparaison 4 : davantage de personnes ont réduit leur consommation d'alcool (de 7 ou plus de 7 jours au cours des 30 jours précédents, à 6 mois) avec la brève intervention motivationnelle par rapport au groupe de contrôle (RR 1,67 ; IC à 95 % de 1,08 à 2,60).

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe très peu de données probantes indiquant qu'il n'y a pas de différence d'efficacité entre les différents types d'interventions et que les interventions brèves ne sont pas supérieures à l'évaluation seule ou au traitement classique. En raison du manque de données et de la mauvaise qualité des études identifiées, on ne peut en tirer aucune conclusion.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales pour réduire la consommation d'alcool chez les usagers de drogues ayant également un problème d'alcool

Quelles thérapies par la parole (accompagnement) sont efficaces pour les usagers de drogues ayant également des problèmes d'alcool ?

Comment définir les problèmes d'alcool et les interventions psychosociales ?

Avoir un problème d'alcool signifie avoir une consommation d'alcool au-delà des limites recommandées. Cela peut entraîner des problèmes d'alcoolisme ou de dépendance. La consommation excessive d'alcool chez les personnes ayant des problèmes avec d'autres drogues est fréquente et souvent, aggrave le problème et a des conséquences graves sur la santé de ces personnes.

Les interventions psychosociales sont des thérapies par la parole qui visent à identifier un problème d'alcool et à motiver la personne à y faire face. Elles peuvent être mises en œuvre par du personnel formé à ces approches thérapeutiques, par exemple médecins, personnel infirmier, conseillers, psychologues, etc. Les thérapies par la parole peuvent aider les personnes à réduire leur consommation d'alcool, mais leur impact chez les personnes ayant des problèmes avec d'autres drogues reste inconnu.

Nous avons souhaité mener une revue afin de déterminer si les thérapies par la parole ont un impact sur les problèmes d'alcool chez les usagers de drogues. Dans cette revue, nous avons évalué des informations issues d'essais randomisés portant sur l'impact des thérapies par la parole sur la consommation d'alcool chez les adultes (plus de 18 ans) usagers de drogues (principalement des opiacés et des stimulants).

Cette revue a identifié les études suivantes et est parvenue aux conclusions suivantes :

Nous avons trouvé quatre études portant sur 594 personnes ayant des problèmes de drogues. L'une d'entre elles a étudié l'apprentissage de stratégies d'adaptation cognitive-comportementale par rapport à une approche en 12 étapes (« 12 step facilitation »). Une étude a examiné une intervention brève par rapport à un traitement classique. Une autre a étudié l'entretien motivationnel (en groupe et individuel) par rapport à une approche d'information en matière d'hépatite. La dernière étude a examiné une intervention motivationnelle brève par rapport à une évaluation, uniquement.

- Les études étaient si différentes que nous n'avons pas pu combiner leurs résultats afin de répondre à notre question.

- En raison de la mauvaise qualité des preuves, il n'est pas possible d'affirmer que les thérapies par la parole ont un effet sur la consommation d'alcool chez les usagers d'autres drogues.

- On ne sait pas si les thérapies par la parole ciblées sur la consommation d'alcool ont un effet sur l'usage de drogues chez les usagers d'autres drogues. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'informations pour comparer les différents types de thérapies par la parole.

- Nombreuses de ces études n'ont pas pris en compte les sources possibles de biais.

- D'autres études de qualité, telles que des essais contrôlés randomisés, sont nécessaires pour répondre à notre question.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�