Intervention Review

Combined oestrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriage

  1. Chi Eung Danforn Lim1,*,
  2. Karen KW Ho2,
  3. Nga Chong Lisa Cheng1,
  4. Felix WS Wong3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 25 SEP 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009278.pub2


How to Cite

Lim CED, Ho KKW, Cheng NCL, Wong FWS. Combined oestrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriage. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD009278. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009278.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of New South Wales, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Blakehurst, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    Liverpool Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, NSW, Australia

  3. 3

    School of Women's and Children's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia

*Chi Eung Danforn Lim, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, PO BOX 3256, Blakehurst, New South Wales, 2221, Australia. celim@unswalumni.com. D.LIM@UNSW.EDU.AU.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 25 SEP 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Historically, oestrogen and progesterone were each commonly used to save threatened pregnancies. In the 1940s it was postulated that their combined use would be synergistic and thereby led to the rationale of combined therapy for women who risked miscarriage.

Objectives

To determine the efficacy and safety of combined oestrogen and progesterone therapy to prevent miscarriage.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (23 June 2013) CENTRAL (OVID) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6 of 12), MEDLINE (OVID) (1946 to June Week 2 2013), OLDMEDLINE (1946 to 1965), Embase (1974 to Week 25 2013), Embase Classic (1947 to 1973), CINAHL (1994 to 23 June 2013) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of combined oestrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriage. We included one stratified randomised trial and one quasi-randomised trials. Cluster-randomised trials were eligible for inclusion but none were identified. We excluded studies published only as abstracts.

We included studies that compared oestrogen and progesterone versus placebo or no intervention.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and assessed trial quality. Two review authors extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy.

Main results

Two trials (281 pregnancies and 282 fetuses) met our inclusion criteria. However, the two trials had significant clinical and methodological heterogeneity such that a meta-analysis combining trial data was considered inappropriate.

One trial (involving 161 pregnancies) was based on women with a history of diabetes. It showed no statistically significant difference between using combined oestrogen and progestogen and using placebo for all our proposed primary outcomes, namely, miscarriage (risk ratio (RR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32 to 2.80), perinatal death (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.69) and preterm birth (less than 34 weeks of gestation) (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.04). In terms of this review's secondary outcomes, use of combined oestrogen and progestogen was associated with an increased risk of maternal cancer in the reproductive system (RR 6.65, 95% CI 1.56 to 28.29). However, for the outcome of cancer other than that of the reproductive system in mothers, there was no difference between groups. Similarly, there were no differences between the combined oestrogen and progestogen group versus placebo for other secondary outcomes reported: low birthweight of less than 2500 g, genital abnormalities in the offspring, abnormalities other than genital tract in the offspring, cancer in the reproductive system in the offspring, or cancer other than of the reproductive system in the offspring.

The second study was based on pregnant women who had undergone in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). This study showed no difference in the rate of miscarriage between the combined oestrogen and progesterone group and the no treatment group (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.23 to 1.85). The study did not report on this review's other primary outcomes (perinatal death or rates of preterm birth), nor on any of our proposed secondary outcomes.

Authors' conclusions

There is an insufficient evidence from randomised controlled trials to assess the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriages. We strongly recommend further research in this area.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Combined use of oestrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriage

The hormones oestrogen and progesterone have established physiological roles in maintaining pregnancy. It has been suggested that supplementation of these hormones could help prevent miscarriage before 24 weeks of pregnancy, particularly in women who have low levels of the hormones, in assisted reproductive technology programs, or who have a history of repeated miscarriages. In our review of randomised controlled trials published in major scientific databases, we only identified two trials that met our inclusion criteria. The two trials involved small numbers of women. One involved 161 women with diabetes who took oral placebo or oral diethylstilboestrol and ethisterone in increasing doses from before the end of the 16th week until birth. The other trial involved 120 women with pregnancy assisted by in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer who continued treatment until the completed 12th week of gestation.

From the little evidence available, the two trials found no evidence that combined oestrogen and progestogen can prevent miscarriage (progestogen is a major class of hormones which includes progesterone) when compared with placebo or usual care. The first of the two studies indicated an increased risk for the mothers who used hormonal therapy during pregnancy of developing cancer later in life. Diethylstilboestrol is no longer in use and poses serious adverse effects while ethisterone contains androgenic properties thought to be responsible for genital abnormalities and has been replaced by progesterone.

Overall, we acknowledge the lack of trials, especially large-scale trials, and therefore suggest further research is needed in this area before supporting or disproving the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone for the prevention of miscarriages.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Utilisation combinée d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour prévenir une fausse couche

Contexte

Historiquement, l’œstrogène et la progestérone étaient tous deux couramment utilisés pour permettre de réduire les risques durant la grossesse. Dans les années 1940, il a été avancé que leur utilisation combinée serait synergique et soutiendrait ainsi la logique de la thérapie combinée pour les femmes risquant des fausses couches.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité et l'innocuité du traitement de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour prévenir les fausses couches.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (23 juin 2013), CENTRAL (OVID) ( la Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 6 de 12), MEDLINE (OVID) (de 1946 à la 2ème semaine de juin 2013), OLDMEDLINE (de 1946 à 1965), Embase (de 1974 à la semaine 25 2013), Embase Classic (de 1947 à 1973), CINAHL (de 1994 au 23 juin 2013) et les références bibliographiques des études trouvées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés ayant évalué l'efficacité de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour prévenir une fausse couche. Nous avons inclus un essai stratifié randomisé et un essai quasi-randomisé. Les essais randomisés par groupes étaient éligibles pour l'inclusion, mais aucun n'a été identifié. Nous avons exclu les études uniquement publiées sous forme de résumés.

Nous avons inclus les études comparant les œstrogènes et la progestérone par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence d'intervention.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les essais à inclure et évalué la qualité des essais. Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données de manière indépendante. L'exactitude des données a été vérifiée.

Résultats Principaux

Deux essais (281 de grossesses et 282 de fœtus) répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Cependant, ils avaient tous deux une hétérogénéité clinique et méthodologique tellement importante qu'une méta-analyse combinant les données des essais a été considérée comme inappropriée.

Un essai (impliquant 161 grossesses) portait sur des femmes ayant des antécédents de diabète. Il n'a montré aucune différence statistiquement significative entre l'utilisation de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestatifs par rapport à un placebo pour tous nos critères de jugement principaux, à savoir, les fausses couches (risque relatif (RR) 0,95, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% de 0,32 à 2,80), la mortalité périnatale (RR 0,94, IC à 95% de 0,53 à 1,69) et les accouchements prématurés (moins de 34 semaines de gestation) (RR 0,91, IC à 95% de 0,80 à 1,04). En termes de critères de jugement secondaires pour cette revue, l'utilisation d’œstrogènes et de progestatifs combinés était associée à un risque accru de cancer de la mère dans le système reproducteur (RR 6,65, IC à 95% de 1,56 à 28,29). Cependant, pour le critère de jugement de cancers autres que ceux du système reproducteur chez les mères, il n'y avait aucune différence entre les groupes. De même, il n'y avait aucune différence entre le groupe d’œstrogènes et de progestatifs combinés par rapport au groupe placebo pour les autres critères de jugement secondaires signalés : poids à la naissance inférieur à 2 500 g, anomalies génitales chez la progéniture, anomalies autres que les voies génitales chez la progéniture, cancer chez la progéniture dans le système reproducteur, ou cancer autres que celui de l'appareil génital chez la progéniture.

La deuxième étude était basée sur les femmes enceintes ayant subi une fécondation in vitro (FIV). Cette étude n’a montré aucune différence dans les taux de fausses couches entre le groupe bénéficiant de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestérone et le groupe sans traitement (RR 0,66, IC à 95% de 0,23 à 1,85). L'étude n'avait pas rendu compte d'autres critères de jugement principaux de cette revue (mortalité périnatale ou taux de naissance prématurée), ni d’aucun de nos critères de jugement secondaires proposés.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'y a pas suffisamment de preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés afin d’évaluer l'utilisation de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour la prévention des fausses couches. Nous recommandons vivement que des recherches supplémentaires soient effectuées dans ce domaine.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Utilisation combinée d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour prévenir une fausse couche

Utilisation combinée d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour prévenir une fausse couche

L’œstrogène et la progestérone sont des hormones ayant un rôle physiologique dans le maintien de la grossesse. Il a été suggéré qu’une supplémentation de ces hormones pourrait permettre de prévenir une fausse couche avant 24 semaines de grossesse, en particulier chez les femmes présentant des faibles niveaux d'hormones, lors des programmes de technologies de procréation médicalement assistée, ou ayant des antécédents de fausses couches à répétition. Dans notre revue d'essais contrôlés randomisés publiés dans les principales bases de données scientifiques, nous avons identifié deux essais qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Les deux essais portaient sur un petit nombre de femmes. Un essai, compreanant 161 femmes atteintes de diabète et prenant un placebo par voie orale ou du diéthylstilboestrol et de l’éthistérone par voie orale, impliquait une augmentation des doses avant la fin de la semaine 16 jusqu' à la naissance. L'autre essai impliquait 120 femmes enceintes, assistées par une fécondation in vitro et un transfert d'embryons, qui poursuivaient le traitement jusqu' à la fin de la 12ème semaine de gestation.

Vu le peu de preuves disponibles, les deux essais n'ont pu démontrer que la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestatifs peuvent prévenir les fausses couches (le progestatif est une grande classe d'hormones qui inclut la progestérone) par rapport à un placebo ou aux soins habituels. La première des deux études indiquait un risque accru pour les mères ayant utilisé l'hormonothérapie pendant la grossesse de développer un cancer plus tard dans la vie. Le diéthylstilboestrol n'est plus utilisé et entraîne des effets indésirables graves, tandis que l’éthistérone contient des propriétés androgéniques jugées responsables d’anomalies de l'appareil génital et a été remplacé par la progestérone.

Dans l’ensemble, nous reconnaissons le manque d’essais, en particulier le manque d'essais randomisés à grande échelle. D’autres recherches sont donc nécessaires dans ce domaine avant de soutenir ou de réfuter l'utilisation de la combinaison d'œstrogènes et de progestérone pour la prévention des fausses couches.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�