Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Inhaled corticosteroids for subacute and chronic cough in adults

  1. Kate J Johnstone1,*,
  2. Anne B Chang2,3,4,
  3. Kwun M Fong1,5,
  4. Rayleen V Bowman1,5,
  5. Ian A Yang1,5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009305.pub2

How to Cite

Johnstone KJ, Chang AB, Fong KM, Bowman RV, Yang IA. Inhaled corticosteroids for subacute and chronic cough in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009305. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009305.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  2. 2

    Charles Darwin University, Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, Northern Territories, Australia

  3. 3

    Royal Children's Hospital, Queensland Children's Respiratory Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  4. 4

    The University of Queensland, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia

  5. 5

    The Prince Charles Hospital, Thoracic Medicine Program, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

*Kate J Johnstone, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, The Prince Charles Hospital, Rode Rd, Brisbane, Queensland, 4032, Australia. kate.johnstone@uqconnect.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Persistent cough is a common clinical problem. Despite thorough investigation and empirical management, a considerable proportion of those people with subacute and chronic cough have unexplained cough, for which treatment options are limited. While current guidelines recommend inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), the research evidence for this intervention is conflicting.

Objectives

To assess the effects of ICS for subacute and chronic cough in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ClinicalTrials.gov in December 2012 and conducted handsearches.

Selection criteria

Two authors independently assessed all potentially relevant trials. All published and unpublished randomised comparisons of ICS versus placebo in adults with subacute or chronic cough were included. Participants with known chronic respiratory disease and asthma were excluded. Studies of cough-variant asthma and eosinophilic bronchitis were eligible.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data pertaining to pre-defined outcomes. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants with clinical cure or significant improvement (over 70% reduction in cough severity measure) at follow up (clinical success). The secondary outcomes included proportion of participants with clinical cure or over 50% reduction in cough severity measure at follow up, mean change in cough severity measures, complications of cough, biomarkers of inflammation and adverse effects. We requested additional data from study authors.

Main results

Eight primary studies, including 570 participants, were included. The overall methodological quality of studies was good. Significant clinical heterogeneity resulting from differences in participants and interventions, as well as variation in outcome measures, limited the validity of comparisons between studies for most outcomes. Data for the primary outcome of clinical cure or significant (> 70%) improvement were available for only three studies, which were too heterogeneous to pool. Similarly, heterogeneity in study characteristics limited the validity of meta-analysis for the secondary outcomes of proportion of participants with clinical cure or over 50% reduction in cough severity measure and clinical cure. One parallel group trial of chronic cough which identified a significant treatment effect contributed the majority of statistical heterogeneity for these outcomes. While ICS treatment resulted in a mean decrease in cough score of 0.34 standard deviations (SMD -0.34; 95% CI -0.56 to -0.13; 346 participants), the quality of evidence was low. Heterogeneity also prevented meta-analysis for the outcome of mean change in visual analogue scale score. Meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of pulmonary function, complications of cough or biomarkers of inflammation due to insufficient data. There was moderate quality evidence that treatment with ICS did not significantly increase the odds of experiencing an adverse event (OR 1.67; 95% CI 0.92 to 3.04).

Authors' conclusions

The studies were highly heterogeneous and results were inconsistent. Heterogeneity in study design needs to be addressed in future research in order to test the efficacy of this intervention. International cough guidelines recommend that a trial of ICS should only be considered in patients after thorough evaluation including chest X-ray and consideration of spirometry and other appropriate investigations.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Inhaled corticosteroids for adults with cough lasting over three weeks

Background
There is often no obvious cause for coughs that last more than three weeks. Lack of a clear cause makes the cough difficult to treat. Current guidelines recommend that in many cases people with cough lasting longer than three weeks be given inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), which are commonly used to treat asthma and other diseases involving airway inflammation.

Review question
We wanted to find out if taking inhaled steroids in adults with cough lasting three weeks or longer were beneficial.

We looked at evidence from clinical trials. We analysed the effects of ICS compared with placebo on cough severity, lung function, complications of cough and airway inflammation, as well as the safety of this treatment.

Study characteristics
We found eight studies on 570 people with cough lasting over three weeks. Studies included different types of participants in terms of age, duration of coughing and risk factors for cough. Studies also varied in types of ICS, doses, treatment lengths and types of inhaler used. Cough severity was measured using different scales.

Key results
We looked at the proportion of people who were clinically cured or showed a significant improvement in cough severity as our primary outcome, but the data were too mixed to be able draw any conclusions. These differences between studies also prevented meaningful pooling of study results for proportion of people showing improvement in cough and average improvement in one specific type of cough scale. There was low quality evidence that ICS reduced cough severity score. There was not enough data about changes in pulmonary function, complications of cough and markers of inflammation to allow pooling of results.There was evidence of moderate quality that ICS treatment did not increase the risk of adverse events.

Conclusion and future work
This review has shown that the effects of ICS for subacute and chronic cough are inconsistent. Further studies with more consistent patient populations, interventions, outcome measures and reporting are needed to determine whether ICS help subacute and chronic cough in adults.

This Cochrane plain language summary was written in December 2012.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Corticostéroïdes inhalés pour le traitement de la toux subaiguë et chronique chez l'adulte

Contexte

Une toux persistante est un problème clinique courant. Malgré des investigations approfondies et une prise en charge empirique, une proportion considérable des personnes présentant une toux subaiguë et chronique ont une toux inexpliquée, pour laquelle les options de traitement sont limitées. Tandis que les directives actuelles recommandent les corticostéroïdes inhalés (CSI), les preuves issues des recherches sur cette intervention sont contradictoires.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des CSI pour le traitement de la toux subaiguë et chronique chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé du groupe thématique Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE et ClinicalTrials.gov en décembre 2012 et nous avons effectué des recherches manuelles.

Critères de sélection

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué tous les essais potentiellement pertinents. Toutes les comparaisons randomisées publiées ou non des CSI versus placebo chez l'adulte présentant une toux subaiguë ou chronique ont été incluses. Les participants présentant une maladie respiratoire chronique et un asthme connus ont été exclus. Les études portant sur la toux asthmatique et la bronchite à éosinophiles étaient éligibles.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment extrait des données relatives aux critères de jugement prédéfinis. Le critère de jugement principal était la proportion de participants présentant une guérison clinique ou une amélioration significative (plus de 70 % de réduction de la mesure de la gravité de la toux) lors du suivi (réussite clinique). Les critères de jugement secondaires incluaient la proportion de participants présentant une guérison clinique ou plus de 50 % de réduction de la mesure de la gravité de la toux lors du suivi, les variations moyennes des mesures de la gravité de la toux, les complications de la toux, les biomarqueurs d'inflammation et les effets indésirables. Nous avons demandé des données supplémentaires aux auteurs des études.

Résultats Principaux

Huit études principales, soit 570 participants, ont été incluses. La qualité méthodologique des études était globalement bonne. Une importante hétérogénéité clinique due aux différences en termes de participants et d'interventions, ainsi qu'aux variations des résultats mesurés, a limité la validité des comparaisons entre les études pour la plupart des résultats. Des données relatives au critère de jugement principal de guérison clinique ou d'amélioration significative (> 70 %) étaient disponibles pour trois études seulement, qui étaient trop hétérogènes pour les regrouper. De même, l'hétérogénéité des caractéristiques des études a limité la validité de la méta-analyse des critères de jugement secondaires de la proportion de participants présentant une guérison clinique ou plus de 50 % de réduction de la mesure de la gravité de la toux et une guérison clinique. Un essai en groupes parallèles de la toux principalement chronique avec une « toux asthmatique » a identifié un effet significatif du traitement et a contribué à la majorité de l'hétérogénéité statistique pour ces résultats. Tandis que le traitement par CSI a abouti à une diminution moyenne du score de la toux de 0,34 écarts-types (DMS -0,34 ; IC à 95 % -0,56 à -0,13 ; 346 participants), la qualité des preuves était faible. L'hétérogénéité a aussi empêché la méta-analyse du résultat de la variation moyenne du score obtenu à l'échelle visuelle analogique. La méta-analyse n'a pas été possible pour les résultats de la fonction pulmonaire, des complications de la toux ou des biomarqueurs d'inflammation en raison de données insuffisantes. Il existait des preuves de qualité modérée indiquant que le traitement par CSI n'a pas significativement augmenté les chances de survenue d'un événement indésirable (RC 1,67 ; IC à 95 % 0,92 à 3,04).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les études étaient très hétérogènes et les résultats étaient contradictoires. L'hétérogénéité de la conception des études doit être résolue dans les futures recherches afin de tester l'efficacité de cette intervention. Les directives internationales relatives à la toux recommandent qu'un essai portant sur les CSI soit envisagé chez des patients uniquement après une évaluation complète comprenant des radiographies pulmonaires et la considération de la spirométrie et d'autres investigations appropriées.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Corticostéroïdes inhalés pour le traitement de la toux subaiguë et chronique chez l'adulte

Corticostéroïdes inhalés chez l'adulte présentant une toux depuis plus de trois semaines

Contexte
Il n'existe souvent aucune cause évidente de la toux qui dure depuis plus de trois semaines. L'absence de cause claire rend le traitement de la toux difficile. Les directives actuelles recommandent dans les nombreux cas de personnes présentant une toux depuis plus de trois semaines, d'administrer des corticostéroïdes inhalés (CSI), qui sont couramment utilisés pour traiter l'asthme et d'autres maladies impliquant l'inflammation des voies respiratoires.

Question de cette revue
Nous voulions déterminer si l'administration de stéroïdes inhalés à des adultes présentant une toux depuis plus de trois semaines ou plus longtemps leur avait été bénéfique.

Nous avons examiné les preuves issues d'essais cliniques. Nous avons analysé les effets des CSI comparativement à un placebo sur la gravité de la toux, la fonction pulmonaire, les complications de la toux et l'inflammation des voies respiratoires, ainsi que la sécurité d'emploi de ce traitement.

Caractéristiques des études
Nous avons trouvé huit études portant sur 570 personnes présentant une toux depuis plus de trois semaines. Les études ont inclus différents types de participants en termes d'âge, de durée de la toux et de facteurs de risque de la toux. Les études différaient aussi par les types de CSI, les doses, les durées de traitement et les types d'inhalateur utilisés. La gravité de la toux a été mesurée à l'aide de différentes échelles.

Principaux résultats
Nous avons examiné la proportion de personnes qui ont été cliniquement guéries ou ont montré une amélioration significative dans la gravité de la toux au titre de notre critère de jugement principal, mais les données étaient trop mélangées pour nous permettre de tirer la moindre conclusion. Ces différences entre les études ont aussi empêché le regroupement des résultats pertinents des études pour la proportion de personnes présentant une amélioration de la toux et une amélioration moyenne dans un type spécifique d'échelle de la toux. Il existait des preuves de faible qualité que les CSI ont réduit le score de gravité de la toux. Les données étaient insuffisantes sur les modifications de la fonction pulmonaire, les complications de la toux et les marqueurs d'inflammation pour permettre le regroupement des résultats. Il existait des preuves de qualité modérée indiquant que le traitement par CSI n'a pas augmenté le risque d'événements indésirables.

Conclusion et recherches futures
Cette revue a démontré que les effets des CSI pour le traitement de la toux subaiguë et chronique sont contradictoires. Il est nécessaire de réaliser d'autres études portant sur des populations de patients, des interventions, des mesures de critères de jugement et une notification des résultats plus homogènes afin de déterminer si les CSI contribuent au traitement de la toux subaiguë et chronique chez l'adulte.

Ce résumé en langage simplifié Cochrane a été rédigé en décembre 2012.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�