Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Schedules for home visits in the early postpartum period

  1. Naohiro Yonemoto1,
  2. Therese Dowswell2,
  3. Shuko Nagai3,
  4. Rintaro Mori4,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009326.pub2


How to Cite

Yonemoto N, Dowswell T, Nagai S, Mori R. Schedules for home visits in the early postpartum period. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009326. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009326.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan

  2. 2

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Department of International Cooperation, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

  4. 4

    National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Health Policy, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

*Rintaro Mori, Department of Health Policy, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Tokyo, 166-0014, Japan. rintaromori@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Maternal complications including psychological and mental health problems and neonatal morbidity have been commonly observed in the postpartum period. Home visits by health professionals or lay supporters in the weeks following the birth may prevent health problems from becoming chronic with long-term effects on women, their babies, and their families.

Objectives

To assess outcomes for women and babies of different home-visiting schedules during the early postpartum period. The review focuses on the frequency of home visits, the duration (when visits ended) and intensity, and on different types of home-visiting interventions.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 January 2013) and reference lists of retrieved articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (including cluster-RCTs) comparing different types of home-visiting interventions enrolling participants in the early postpartum period (up to 42 days after birth). We excluded studies in which women were enrolled and received an intervention during the antenatal period (even if the intervention continued into the postnatal period) and studies recruiting only women from specific high-risk groups. (e.g. women with alcohol or drug problems).

Data collection and analysis

Study eligibility was assessed by at least two review authors. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were carried out independently by at least two review authors. Data were entered into Review Manager software.

Main results

We included data from 12 randomised trials with data for more than 11,000 women. The trials were carried out in countries across the world, and in both high- and low-resource settings. In low-resource settings women receiving usual care may have received no additional postnatal care after early hospital discharge.

The interventions and control conditions varied considerably across studies with trials focusing on three broad types of comparisons: schedules involving more versus fewer postnatal home visits (five studies), schedules involving different models of care (three studies), and home versus hospital clinic postnatal check-ups (four studies). In all but two of the included studies, postnatal care at home was delivered by healthcare professionals. The aim of all interventions was broadly to assess the wellbeing of mothers and babies, and to provide education and support, although some interventions had more specific aims such as to encourage breastfeeding, or to provide practical support.

For most of our outcomes only one or two studies provided data, and overall results were inconsistent.

There was no evidence that home visits were associated with improvements in maternal and neonatal mortality, and no strong evidence that more postnatal visits at home were associated with improvements in maternal health. More intensive schedules of home visits did not appear to improve maternal psychological health and results from two studies suggested that women receiving more visits had higher mean depression scores. The reason for this finding was not clear. There was some evidence that postnatal care at home may reduce infant health service utilisation in the weeks following the birth, and that more home visits may encourage more women to exclusively breastfeed their babies. There was some evidence that home visits are associated with increased maternal satisfaction with postnatal care.

Authors' conclusions

Overall, findings were inconsistent. Postnatal home visits may promote infant health and maternal satisfaction. However, the frequency, timing, duration and intensity of such postnatal care visits should be based upon local needs. Further well designed RCTs evaluating this complex intervention will be required to formulate the optimal package.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Home visits in the early period after the birth of a baby

Health problems for mothers and babies commonly occur or become apparent in the weeks following the birth. For the mothers these include postpartum haemorrhage, fever and infection, abdominal and back pain, abnormal discharge, thromboembolism, and urinary tract complications, as well as psychological and mental health problems such as postnatal depression. Mothers may also need support to establish breastfeeding. Babies are at risk of death related to infections, asphyxia, and preterm birth. Home visits by health professionals or lay supporters in the early postpartum period may prevent health problems from becoming long-term, with effects on women, their babies, and their families. This review looked at different home-visiting schedules in the weeks following the birth.

We included 12 randomised trials with data for more than 11,000 women. Some trials focused on physical checks of the mother and newborn, while others provided support for breastfeeding, and one included the provision of practical support with housework and childcare. They were carried out in both high-resource countries and low-resource settings where women receiving usual care may not have received additional postnatal care after early hospital discharge.

The trials focused on three broad types of comparisons: schedules involving more versus less postnatal home visits (five studies), schedules involving different models of care (three studies), and home versus hospital clinic postnatal check-ups (four studies). In all but two of the included studies postnatal care at home was delivered by healthcare professionals. For most of our outcomes only one or two studies provided data and overall results were inconsistent.

There was no evidence that home visits were associated with reduced newborn deaths or serious health problems for the mothers. Women's physical and psychological health were not improved with more intensive schedules of home visits. Overall, babies were less likely to have emergency medical care if their mothers received more postnatal home visits. More home visits may have encouraged more women to exclusively breastfeed their babies. The different outcomes reported in different studies, how the outcomes were measured, and the considerable variation in the interventions and control conditions across studies were limitations of this review. The studies were of mixed quality as regards risk of bias.

More research is needed before any particular schedule of postnatal care can be recommended

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Calendriers pour les visites à domicile au tout début de la période post-partum

Contexte

Les complications maternelles incluant les problèmes de santé psychologique et mentale et la morbidité néonatale ont été généralement observées pendant la période post-partum. Les visites à domicile par des professionnels de santé ou des aidants maternels au cours des semaines qui suivent la naissance peuvent permettre d'éviter que les problèmes de santé ne deviennent des problèmes chroniques, avec des effets à long terme sur les femmes, leurs bébés et leurs familles.

Objectifs

Évaluer les critères de jugement chez les femmes et les bébés inclus dans différents calendriers de visites à domicile au tout début de la période post-partum. Cette revue est consacrée à la fréquence des visites à domicile, à la durée de chacune d'elles (quand les visites se sont terminées) et à leur intensité, ainsi qu'aux différents types d'interventions relatives aux visites à domicile.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (lundi 28 janvier 2013) et dans les références bibliographiques des articles trouvés.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) (y compris les ECR en grappes) comparant différents types d'interventions relatives aux visites à domicile ayant recruté les participants au tout début de la période post-partum (jusqu'à 42 jours après la naissance). Nous avons exclu les études dans lesquelles les femmes ont été recrutées et ont bénéficié d'une intervention pendant la période prénatale (même si l'intervention a été poursuivie pendant la période postnatale) et les études ayant recruté uniquement des femmes appartenant à des groupes à haut risque spécifiques. (par exemple des femmes ayant des problèmes de toxicomanie ou d’alcoolisme).

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué l'éligibilité des études. Au moins deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais. Les données ont été saisies dans le logiciel Review Manager.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus des données issues de 12 essais randomisés fournissant des données pour plus de 11 000 femmes. Les essais ont été réalisés dans différents pays à travers le monde, et aussi bien dans des pays à haut revenu que dans des pays à faible revenu. Dans les pays à faible revenu, les femmes recevant des soins standard peuvent ne pas avoir reçu de soins postnataux supplémentaires après une sortie précoce de l'hôpital.

Les interventions et les conditions de contrôle variaient considérablement entre les études avec des essais consacrés à trois grands types de comparaisons : les calendriers prévoyant plus versus moins de visites postnatales à domicile (cinq études), les calendriers prévoyant différents modèles de soins (trois études), et des examens postnataux cliniques à domicile versus à l'hôpital (quatre études). Dans toutes les études incluses sauf deux, les soins postnataux à domicile ont été dispensés par des professionnels de santé. L'objectif de toutes les interventions était généralement d'évaluer le bien-être des mères et de leurs bébés, et d'apporter une éducation et un soutien, même si certaines interventions avaient des buts plus spécifiques comme le fait d'encourager l'allaitement au sein, ou de proposer un soutien pratique.

Une ou deux études seulement ont fourni des données pour la plupart de nos critères de jugement et les résultats globaux étaient contradictoires.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve que les visites à domicile ont été associées à des améliorations de la mortalité maternelle et néonatale, et aucune preuve solide que des visites postnatales à domicile plus nombreuses ont été associées à des améliorations de la santé maternelle. Il semble que des calendriers plus intensifs de visites à domicile n'ont pas amélioré la santé psychologique maternelle et les résultats obtenus dans deux études ont suggéré que les femmes bénéficiant de visites plus nombreuses avaient obtenu des scores de dépression moyens plus élevés. La raison de cette constatation n'était pas claire. Il existait certaines preuves indiquant que les soins postnataux à domicile peuvent réduire l'utilisation des services de santé pour les nourrissons au cours des semaines qui suivent la naissance, et que des visites à domicile plus nombreuses peuvent encourager davantage de femmes à allaiter leurs bébés exclusivement au sein. Il existe certaines preuves indiquant que les visites à domicile sont associées à une satisfaction maternelle accrue s'agissant des soins postnataux.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats étaient globalement contradictoires. Les visites postnatales à domicile peuvent favoriser la santé des nourrissons et la satisfaction maternelle. Toutefois, la fréquence, le calendrier, la durée et l'intensité de ces visites postnatales à domicile devraient être adaptés aux besoins des populations locales. Des ECR supplémentaires bien conçus évaluant cette intervention complexe seront indispensables pour formuler le programme optimal.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Calendriers pour les visites à domicile au tout début de la période post-partum

Visites à domicile au tout début de la période après la naissance d'un bébé

Les problèmes de santé chez les mères et leurs bébés surviennent fréquemment ou deviennent apparents au cours des semaines qui suivent la naissance. Pour les mères ces derniers incluent l'hémorragie post-partum, la fièvre et l'infection, la douleur abdominale et les dorsalgies (mal de dos), la sortie anormale, la thromboembolie, et les complications liées aux voies urinaires, ainsi que les problèmes de santé psychologique et mentale tels que la dépression postnatale. En outre, les mères peuvent nécessiter une prise en charge pour l'allaitement de leurs bébés. Les bébés sont exposés à un risque de décès lié aux infections, à l'asphyxie et à la naissance prématurée. Les visites à domicile par des professionnels de santé ou des aidants maternels au tout début de la période post-partum peuvent permettre d'éviter que les problèmes de santé ne deviennent des problèmes à long terme, ayant des effets sur les femmes, leurs bébés et leurs familles. Cette revue a examiné différents calendriers de visites à domicile au cours des semaines qui suivent la naissance.

Nous avons inclus 12 essais randomisés fournissant des données pour plus de 11 000 femmes. Certains essais ont été consacrés aux examens cliniques de la mère et du nouveau-né, tandis que d'autres ont prévu une prise en charge des mères pour l'allaitement de leurs bébés, et qu'un essai a inclus la prestation d'un soutien pratique pour les travaux ménagers et la garde des enfants. Ils ont été réalisés aussi bien dans des pays à haut revenu que dans des pays à faible revenu dans lesquels les femmes recevant des soins standard peuvent ne pas avoir reçu de soins postnataux supplémentaires après une sortie précoce de l'hôpital.

Les essais ont exclusivement portés sur trois grands types de comparaisons : les calendriers prévoyant plus versus moins de visites postnatales à domicile (cinq études), les calendriers prévoyant différents modèles de soins (trois études), et des examens postnataux cliniques à domicile versus à l'hôpital (quatre études). Dans toutes les études incluses sauf deux, les soins postnataux à domicile ont été dispensés par des professionnels de santé. Une ou deux études seulement ont fourni des données pour la plupart de nos critères de jugement et les résultats globaux étaient contradictoires.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve que les visites à domicile ont été associées à une baisse du nombre de décès de nouveau-nés ou de problèmes de santé graves chez les mères. La santé physique et psychologique des femmes ne s'est pas améliorée avec des calendriers de visites à domicile plus intensives. Globalement, les bébés avaient moins de chances de nécessiter des soins médicaux d'urgence si les mères avaient bénéficié de visites postnatales à domicile plus nombreuses. Des visites à domicile plus nombreuses ont pu encourager davantage de femmes à allaiter leurs bébés exclusivement au sein. Les différents critères de jugement rapportés dans les différentes études, le mode de mesure des critères de jugement, ainsi que les variations considérables entre les interventions et les conditions de contrôle parmi les études ont constitué des limites pour cette revue. Les études étaient d'une qualité inégale en ce qui concerne les risques de biais.

D'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour que l'on puisse recommander un calendrier précis de soins postnataux

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.