Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Prophylactic interventions after delivery of placenta for reducing bleeding during the postnatal period

  1. Yukari Yaju1,
  2. Yaeko Kataoka2,
  3. Hiromi Eto3,
  4. Shigeko Horiuchi2,
  5. Rintaro Mori4,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 26 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 9 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009328.pub2


How to Cite

Yaju Y, Kataoka Y, Eto H, Horiuchi S, Mori R. Prophylactic interventions after delivery of placenta for reducing bleeding during the postnatal period. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD009328. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009328.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    St. Luke's College of Nursing, Research Center for Development of Nursing Practice, Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan

  2. 2

    St. Luke's College of Nursing, Maternal Infant Nursing and Midwifery, Akashi-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan

  3. 3

    Nagasaki University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Division of Reproductive Health-International Health Nursing, Nagasaki, Tokyo, Japan

  4. 4

    National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Health Policy, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

*Rintaro Mori, Department of Health Policy, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Tokyo, 166-0014, Japan. rintaromori@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 26 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

There are several Cochrane systematic reviews looking at postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) prophylaxis in the third stage of labour and another Cochrane review investigating the timing of prophylactic uterotonics in the third stage of labour (i.e. before or after delivery of the placenta). There are, however, no Cochrane reviews looking at the use of interventions given purely after delivery of the placenta. Ergometrine or methylergometrine are used for the prevention of PPH in the postpartum period (the period after delivery of the infant) after delivery of the placenta in some countries. There are, furthermore, no Cochrane reviews that have so far considered herbal therapies or homeopathic remedies for the prevention of PPH after delivery of the placenta.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of available prophylactic interventions for PPH including prophylactic use of ergotamine, ergometrine, methylergometrine, herbal therapies, and homeopathic remedies, administered after delivery of the placenta, compared with no uterotonic agents as well as with different routes of administration for prevention of PPH after delivery of the placenta.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013), The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (USA),  Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) (UK), European Medicines Agency (EMA) (EU), Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) (Japan),  Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) (Australia), ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR; Japan), Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center Clinical Trials Information (Japic-CTI; Japan), Japan Medical Association Clinical Trial Registration (JMACCT CTR; Japan) (all on 30 April 2013) and reference lists of retrieved studies

Selection criteria

All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic ergotamine, ergometrine, methylergometrine, herbal therapies, and homeopathic remedies (using any route and timing of administration) during the postpartum period after delivery of the placenta with no uterotonic agents or trials comparing different routes or timing of administration of ergotamine, ergometrine, methylergometrine, herbal therapies, and homeopathic remedies, during the postpartum period after delivery of the placenta.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the methodological quality of trials, extracted data using the agreed form. Data were checked for accuracy.

Main results

Five randomised studies involving 1466 women met the inclusion criteria. All studies were classified as having an unclear risk of bias. Two studies (involving 1097 women) compared oral methylergometrine with a placebo, and one (involving 171 women) compared oral methylergometrine with Kyuki-chouketsu-in, a Japanese traditional herbal medicine. The remaining two studies (involving 198 women) did not report the outcomes of interest for this review. None of the included studies reported primary outcomes prespecified in the review protocol (blood loss of 1000 mL or more over the period of observation, maternal death or severe morbidity). Overall, there was no clear evidence of differences between groups in the following PPH outcomes: blood loss of 500 mL or more (risk ratio (RR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 5.47, two studies), amount of lochia during the first 72 hours of the puerperium (mean difference (MD) -25.00 g; 95% CI -69.79 to 19.79, one study), or amount of lochia by four weeks postpartum (MD -7.00 g; 95% CI -23.99 to 9.99).

The Japanese study with a relatively small sample size comparing oral methylergometrine with a Japanese traditional herbal medicine found that oral methylergometrine significantly increased the blood haemoglobin concentration at day one postpartum (MD 0.50 g/dL; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.89) compared to herbal medicine. Adverse events were not well-reported in the included studies. We did not find any studies comparing homeopathic remedies with either a placebo or no treatment.

Authors' conclusions

There was insufficient evidence to support the use of prophylactic oral methylergometrine given after delivery of the placenta for the prevention of PPH. Additionally, the effectiveness of prophylactic use of herbal medicine or homeopathic remedies for PPH is still unclear as we could not find any clear evidence. Trials to assess the effectiveness of herbal medicines and homeopathic remedies in preventing PPH are warranted.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prophylactic interventions after delivery of placenta for reducing bleeding during the postnatal period

Haemorrhage following childbirth (postpartum haemorrhage) is a major cause of maternal death and health problems in resource-poor settings in both low- and high-income countries. Postpartum haemorrhage is defined as blood loss from the genital tract of more than 500 mL, generally occurring within the first 24 hours after delivering the placenta and occasionally between 24 hours and six to 12 weeks. Possible causes are the uterus (womb) failing to contract after delivery (uterine atony), a retained placenta, inverted or ruptured uterus, and cervical, vaginal, or perineal lacerations. To address these issues, the joint policy statements between the International Confederation of Midwives, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and the World Health Organization recommend 'active management of third stage of labour', which includes the administration of a uterotonic drug (intravenous oxytocin), just before or just after delivery in order to help the uterine muscles to contract. The use of oral uterotonic drugs such as methylergometrine for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage after delivery of the placenta is not recommended in the joint policy statements. Yet orally delivered uterotonic drugs, such as ergot alkaloids (including methylergometrine), herbal therapies, or homeopathic remedies are easy-to-administer agents that may be considered as possible alternatives after delivery of the placenta in developing countries, as in Japan. We set out to determine whether such agents are effective in preventing haemorrhage after childbirth. We found a total of five randomised clinical trials (involving 1466 women). In three of the trials (involving 1268 women), oral methylergometrine was compared with placebo (two trials) or the Japanese traditional herbal medicine Kyuki-chouketsu-in (one trial). The other two trials (involving 198 women) did not report information on relevant outcomes of interest for this review. Overall, there was no clear evidence that prophylactic oral methylergometrine was effective in reducing haemorrhage after childbirth. The trials were not of good quality and adverse events were not well-reported. We did not find any completed trials looking at the effectiveness of homeopathic remedies in reducing haemorrhage after childbirth. The effectiveness of such remedies warrants further investigation.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions prophylactiques après la délivrance du placenta pour réduire les saignements durant la période postnatale

Contexte

Plusieurs revues systématiques Cochrane examinent la prophylaxie de l'hémorragie du post-partum (HPP) dans la troisième phase du travail et une autre revue Cochrane portant sur le moment choisi pour administrer des utérotoniques prophylactiques dans la troisième phase du travail (avant ou après la délivrance du placenta). Cependant, aucune revue Cochrane n’examine d’interventions administrées purement après la délivrance du placenta. Dans certains pays, l’ergométrine ou le méthylergométrine sont utilisés pour la prévention de l'HPP durant la période post-partum (la période après l'accouchement du nourrisson) après l'expulsion du placenta. De plus, aucune revue Cochrane n’a considéré les traitements à base de plantes ou les remèdes homéopathiques pour la prévention de l'HPP après la délivrance du placenta.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions prophylactiques disponibles pour le traitement de l'HPP y compris l'administration prophylactique d'ergotamine, d'ergométrine, de méthylergométrine, des traitements à base de plantes et des remèdes homéopathiques, après la délivrance du placenta, par rapport à l'absence d’agents utérotoniques ainsi que par différentes voies d'administration pour la prévention de l'HPP après la délivrance du placenta.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (30 avril 2013), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (États-Unis), et Healthcare Products Regulatory Medicines Agency (MHRA) (Royaume-Uni), European Medicines Agency (EMA) (eu), Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) (Japon), Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) (Australie), ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR; Japan), Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center Clinical Trials Information (Japic-CTI; Japan), Japan Medical Association Clinical Trial Registration (JMACCT CTR; Japan) (tous au 30 avril 2013) et les références bibliographiques des études trouvées

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés comparant l'administration prophylactique d'ergotamine, d'ergométrine, de méthylergométrine, de traitements à base de plantes et des remèdes homéopathiques (à l'aide de n'importe quelle voie et à n’importe quel moment d'administration) pendant la période post-partum après la délivrance du placenta à l'absence d’agents utérotoniques ou les essais comparant les différentes voies ou les différents moments d'administration d'ergotamine, d'ergométrine, de méthylergométrine, des traitements à base de plantes et des remèdes homéopathiques, pendant la période post-partum après la délivrance du placenta.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité et la qualité méthodologique des essais, extrait les données à l'aide du formulaire agréé. Nous avons vérifié l’exactitude des données.

Résultats Principaux

Cinq études randomisées portant sur 466 femmes remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Toutes les études ont été classées comme ayant un risque de biais incertain. Deux études (impliquant 1 097 femmes) comparaient le méthylergométrine par voie orale à un placebo, et un essai (impliquant 171 femmes) comparait le méthylergométrine par voie orale par rapport au Kyuki-chouketsu-in, une plante médicinale traditionnelle japonaise. Les deux autres études (totalisant 198 femmes) ne rapportaient pas les critères de jugement principaux pour cette revue. Aucune des études incluses n'avait rendu compte de critères de jugement principaux prédéfinis dans le protocole de la revue (une perte de sang supérieure à 1 000 ml par rapport à la période d'observation, le décès maternel ou la morbidité grave). Dans l’ensemble, il n'y avait aucune différence claire entre les groupes pour les critères de jugement HPP suivants: la perte de sang supérieure à 500 ml (risque relatif (RR) 1,45; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% de 0,39 à 5,47, deux études), la quantité de lochia pendant les 72 heures suivant le post-partum (différence moyenne (DM) -25,00 g; IC à 95% de 69,79 à 19,79, une étude), ou la quantité de lochia pendant quatre semaines postpartum (DM -7,00 g; IC à 95% de 23,99 à 9,99).

L'étude japonaise de taille relativement petite comparant le méthylergométrine par voie orale avec des plantes médicinales japonaises traditionnelles, a constaté que le méthylergométrine par voie orale a augmenté significativement la concentration en hémoglobine sanguine un jour après la naissance (DM 0,50 g/dl; IC à 95% 0,11 à 0,89) par rapport aux plantes médicinales. Les effets indésirables n'ont pas été correctement rapportés dans les études incluses. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude comparant des remèdes homéopathiques à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour recommander l'utilisation de méthylergométrine prophylactique oral administré après la délivrance du placenta pour la prévention de l'HPP. De plus, l'efficacité de l'utilisation prophylactique de plantes médicinales ou de remèdes homéopathiques pour le traitement de l'HPP n’est toujours pas claire, étant donné que nous n'avons pas trouvé de preuves précises. Des essais pour évaluer l'efficacité des plantes médicinales et des remèdes homéopathique dans la prévention de l'HPP sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions prophylactiques après la délivrance du placenta pour réduire les saignements durant la période postnatale

Interventions prophylactiques après la délivrance du placenta pour réduire les saignements durant la période postnatale

Une hémorragie après l'accouchement (hémorragie du post-partum) est une cause majeure de mortalité maternelle et de problèmes de santé dans les environnements aux ressources limitées aussi bien dans les pays à faible revenu qu’à revenu élevé. L'hémorragie du post-partum est définie comme une perte de sang supérieure à 500 ml provenant de l'appareil génital, généralement survenant dans les premières 24 heures après la délivrance du placenta et parfois entre 24 heures et 6 à 12 semaines. Les causes possibles sont : l'utérus ne parvient pas à se contracter après l'accouchement (atonie utérine), une rétention du placenta, une inversion ou une rupture de l'utérus et des lacérations cervicales, vaginales ou périnéales. Pour répondre à ces questions, les déclarations de principes communs entre la Confédération Internationale des Sages-Femmes, la Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d’Obstétrique et l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé recommandent « une prise en charge active de la troisième phase du travail », qui inclut l'administration d'un médicament utérotonique (l'ocytocine par voie intraveineuse), juste avant ou juste après l'accouchement afin d'aider les muscles de l'utérus à se contracter. L'utilisation d'utérotoniques oraux tels que le méthylergométrine pour la prévention de l'hémorragie du post-partum après la délivrance du placenta n’est pas recommandée dans les déclarations de principes communs. Toutefois, les médicaments utérotoniques, tels que l'ergot de seigle (y compris le méthylergométrine), les traitements à base de plantes, ou homéopathiques, sont faciles à administrer oralement et pourraient être considérés comme une alternative possible après la délivrance du placenta dans les pays en voie de développement, tels qu’au Japon. Nous avons cherché à déterminer si ces agents sont efficaces pour prévenir les hémorragies après l'accouchement. Nous avons trouvé un total de cinq essais cliniques randomisés (portant sur 466 femmes). Dans trois des essais (impliquant 1268 femmes), le méthylergométrine oral était comparé à un placebo (deux essais) ou à une plante médicinale japonaise traditionnelle, le Kyuki-chouketsu-in (un essai). Les deux autres essais (portant sur 198 femmes) n'ont pas rapporté d’informations sur les critères de jugement pertinents pour cette revue. Dans l’ensemble, il n'y avait pas de preuve claire que le méthylergométrine prophylactique oral était efficace pour réduire les hémorragies après l'accouchement. Les essais n'étaient pas de bonne qualité et les effets indésirables n'ont pas été correctement rapportés. Nous n'avons trouvé aucun essai terminé étudiant l'efficacité des remèdes homéopathiques dans la réduction des hémorragies après l'accouchement. L'efficacité de ces remèdes justifie la réalisation de recherches plus approfondies.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�, Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux