Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Telephone support for women during pregnancy and the first six weeks postpartum

  1. Tina Lavender1,*,
  2. Yana Richens2,
  3. Stephen J Milan3,
  4. Rebecca MD Smyth1,
  5. Therese Dowswell4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 18 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009338.pub2


How to Cite

Lavender T, Richens Y, Milan SJ, Smyth RMD, Dowswell T. Telephone support for women during pregnancy and the first six weeks postpartum. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009338. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009338.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Manchester, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    University College London Hospital Foundation Trust, Elizabeth Garett Anderson and Obstetric Hospital, London, UK

  3. 3

    St George's University of London, Population Health Sciences and Education, London, UK

  4. 4

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

*Tina Lavender, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. tina.lavender@manchester.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Background

Telephone communication is increasingly being accepted as a useful form of support within health care. There is some evidence that telephone support may be of benefit in specific areas of maternity care such as to support breastfeeding and for women at risk of depression. There is a plethora of telephone-based interventions currently being used in maternity care. It is therefore timely to examine which interventions may be of benefit, which are ineffective, and which may be harmful.

Objectives

To assess the effects of telephone support during pregnancy and the first six weeks post birth, compared with routine care, on maternal and infant outcomes.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (23 January 2013) and reference lists of all retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials, comparing telephone support with routine care or with another supportive intervention aimed at pregnant women and women in the first six weeks post birth.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently assessed studies identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. Data were entered by one review author and checked by a second. Where necessary, we contacted trial authors for further information on methods or results.

Main results

We have included data from 27 randomised trials involving 12,256 women. All of the trials examined telephone support versus usual care (no additional telephone support). We did not identify any trials comparing different modes of telephone support (for example, text messaging versus one-to-one calls). All but one of the trials were carried out in high-resource settings. The majority of studies examined support provided via telephone conversations between women and health professionals although a small number of trials included telephone support from peers. In two trials women received automated text messages. Many of the interventions aimed to address specific health problems and collected data on behavioural outcomes such as smoking cessation and relapse (seven trials) or breastfeeding continuation (seven trials). Other studies examined support interventions aimed at women at high risk of postnatal depression (two trials) or preterm birth (two trials); the rest of the interventions were designed to offer women more general support and advice.

For most of our pre-specified outcomes few studies contributed data, and many of the results described in the review are based on findings from only one or two studies. Overall, results were inconsistent and inconclusive although there was some evidence that telephone support may be a promising intervention. Results suggest that telephone support may increase women's overall satisfaction with their care during pregnancy and the postnatal period, although results for both periods were derived from only two studies. There was no consistent evidence confirming that telephone support reduces maternal anxiety during pregnancy or after the birth of the baby, although results on anxiety outcomes were not easy to interpret as data were collected at different time points using a variety of measurement tools. There was evidence from two trials that women at high risk of depression who received support had lower mean depression scores in the postnatal period, although there was no clear evidence that women who received support were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression. Results from trials offering breastfeeding telephone support were also inconsistent, although the evidence suggests that telephone support may increase the duration of breastfeeding. There was no strong evidence that women receiving telephone support were less likely to be smoking at the end of pregnancy or during the postnatal period.

For infant outcomes, such as preterm birth and infant birthweight, overall, there was little evidence. Where evidence was available, there were no clear differences between groups. Results from two trials suggest that babies whose mothers received support may have been less likely to have been admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), although it is not easy to understand the mechanisms underpinning this finding.

Authors' conclusions

Despite some encouraging findings, there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine telephone support for women accessing maternity services, as the evidence from included trials is neither strong nor consistent. Although benefits were found in terms of reduced depression scores, breastfeeding duration and increased overall satisfaction, the current trials do not provide strong enough evidence to warrant investment in resources.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Telephone support for women during pregnancy and up to six weeks after the birth

Telephone support may be of benefit to women with particular problems during pregnancy and in the first six weeks after the birth of the baby but it is not clear which interventions may be helpful, which are ineffective, and which may be harmful.

Telephone communication is increasingly being accepted as a useful form of support within health care, with many telephone-based interventions currently being used in maternity care.

In this review we have included results from 27 randomised trials with more than 12,000 women. All of the trials examined telephone support versus usual care (no additional telephone support). In two trials women received automated text messages. We did not identify any trials comparing different types of telephone support (for example, text messaging versus one-to-one calls). All but one of the trials were carried out in high-resource settings. The majority of studies examined support provided via telephone conversations between women and health professionals although a small number of trials included telephone support from peers. Many of the results described in the review are based on findings from only one or two studies. Overall, results were inconsistent and inconclusive. Telephone support may increase women's overall satisfaction with their care during pregnancy and the postnatal period; although results for both periods were from only two studies. There was no consistent evidence confirming that telephone support reduces anxiety during pregnancy or after the birth of the baby. Evidence from two trials showed that women who received support had lower average depression scores in the postnatal period but without clear evidence that women who were supported were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression. Results from trials encouraging breastfeeding through telephone support were also inconsistent, although there was some evidence that telephone support may increase the duration of breastfeeding. There was no strong evidence that women receiving telephone support were less likely to be smoking at the end of pregnancy or during the postnatal period.

For infant outcomes, such as preterm birth and infant birthweight, overall, there was little evidence. Where evidence was available, there were no clear differences between groups.

There remains uncertainty regarding the benefit of telephone support and despite some encouraging findings, there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine telephone support for women accessing maternity services.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Soutien par téléphone chez les femmes pendant la grossesse et les six premières semaines post-partum

Contexte

La communication par téléphone est de plus en plus acceptée comme une forme de soutien utile dans le cadre des soins médicaux. Il existe certaines preuves que le soutien par téléphone peut s'avérer bénéfique dans des domaines spécifiques des soins de maternité tels que le soutien pour l'allaitement au sein et chez les femmes présentant un risque de dépression. Actuellement, une pléthore d'interventions téléphoniques est utilisée en maternité. Il est par conséquent opportun d'examiner quelles sont les interventions qui peuvent s'avérer bénéfiques, qui sont inefficaces et qui peuvent se révéler dangereuses.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets du soutien par téléphone pendant la grossesse et les six premières semaines après la naissance, comparé aux soins de routine, sur les critères de jugement chez la mère et le nourrisson.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (mercredi 23 janvier 2013) et dans les références bibliographiques de toutes les études trouvées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés, comparant le soutien par téléphone aux soins de routine ou à une autre intervention de soutien destinée aux femmes enceintes et aux femmes pendant les six premières semaines après la naissance.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs ont évalué de manière indépendante les études éligibles à l'inclusion identifiées par la stratégie de recherche, puis ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais. Les données ont été extraites par un auteur et vérifiées par un deuxième. Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons contacté les auteurs des essais pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires sur les méthodes ou les résultats.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus les données de 27 essais randomisés impliquant un total de 12 256 femmes. Les essais ont tous examiné le soutien par téléphone versus les soins ordinaires (pas de soutien par téléphone supplémentaire). Nous n'avons pas identifié d'essais comparant différents types de soutien par téléphone (par exemple, messages texte versus appels individuels). Tous les essais sauf un ont été effectués dans des pays à haut revenu. La majorité des études ont examiné le soutien dispensé via des conversations téléphoniques entre les femmes et les professionnels de santé même si un petit nombre d'essais ont inclus le soutien par téléphone dispensé par des pairs. Dans deux essais, les femmes ont reçu des messages textuels automatiques. Un grand nombre d'interventions visaient à aborder des problèmes de santé spécifiques et recueillir des données sur les critères comportementaux tels que l'arrêt du tabac et la récidive (sept essais) ou la poursuite de l'allaitement (sept essais). D'autres études ont examiné des interventions de soutien destinées aux femmes présentant un risque élevé de dépression postnatale (deux essais) ou d'accouchement prématuré (deux essais) ; le reste des interventions ont été conçues pour apporter aux femmes un soutien plus général et leur proposer des conseils.

Pour la plupart de nos critères prédéterminés, peu d'études ont contribué en fournissant des données, et un grand nombre des résultats décrits dans la revue sont fondés sur les conclusions tirées d'une ou deux études seulement. Globalement, les résultats étaient contradictoires et peu probants même s'il existait certaines preuves que le soutien par téléphone peut représenter une intervention prometteuse. Les résultats suggèrent que le soutien par téléphone peut peut-être augmenter la satisfaction globale des femmes vis-à-vis de leurs soins pendant la grossesse et la période postnatale, même si les résultats pour les deux périodes ont été dérivés de deux études seulement. Il n'existait aucune preuve probante pour confirmer que le soutien par téléphone réduit l'anxiété maternelle pendant la grossesse ou après la naissance du bébé, même si les résultats pour les problèmes d'anxiété n'étaient pas faciles à interpréter étant donné que les données ont été recueillies à différents points temporels à l'aide de différents outils de mesure. Il existait des preuves issues de deux essais indiquant que les femmes présentant un risque élevé de dépression ayant bénéficié d'un soutien avaient obtenu des scores de dépression moyens inférieurs pendant la période postnatale, même s'il n'y avait aucune preuve probante que les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien étaient moins susceptibles d'avoir un diagnostic de dépression. Les résultats tirés des essais proposant un soutien par téléphone pour encourager l'allaitement au sein étaient également contradictoires, même si les preuves suggèrent que le soutien par téléphone est susceptible d'augmenter la durée de l'allaitement. Il n'y avait aucune preuve solide indiquant que les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien par téléphone étaient moins susceptibles de fumer à la fin de la grossesse ou pendant la période postnatale.

Pour les critères concernant les nourrissons, tels que la naissance prématurée et le poids à la naissance des nourrissons, dans l'ensemble, il existait très peu de preuves. Lorsque les données étaient disponibles, aucune différence nette n'a été observée entre les groupes. Les résultats tirés de deux essais suggèrent qu'il est possible que les bébés dont la mère a bénéficié d'un soutien aient été moins susceptibles d'être admis en unité néonatale de soins intensifs (UNSI), même s'il n'est pas facile de comprendre les mécanismes qui sous-tendent cette conclusion.

Conclusions des auteurs

Malgré certains résultats encourageants, les preuves sont insuffisantes pour recommander le recours systématique au soutien par téléphone chez les femmes ayant accès aux services de maternité, étant donné que les preuves issues des essais inclus ne sont ni solides ni probantes. Même si des bénéfices ont été enregistrés en ce qui concerne la baisse des scores de dépression, de la durée de l'allaitement et l'augmentation de la satisfaction globale, les essais actuels n'apportent pas de preuves suffisamment solides pour justifier un investissement dans les ressources correspondantes.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Soutien par téléphone chez les femmes pendant la grossesse et les six premières semaines post-partum

Soutien par téléphone chez les femmes pendant la grossesse et jusqu'à six semaines après la naissance

Le soutien par téléphone peut s'avérer bénéfique chez les femmes présentant des problèmes particuliers pendant la grossesse et les six premières semaines suivant la naissance du bébé mais on ignore encore quelles sont les interventions qui peuvent s'avérer utiles, qui sont inefficaces et qui peuvent se révéler dangereuses.

La communication par téléphone est de plus en plus acceptée comme une forme de soutien utile dans le cadre des soins médicaux, alliée à de nombreuses interventions téléphoniques qui sont actuellement mises en œuvre en maternité.

Dans cette revue, nous avons inclus les résultats tirés de 27 essais randomisés totalisant plus de 12 000 femmes. Les essais ont tous examiné le soutien par téléphone versus les soins ordinaires (pas de soutien par téléphone supplémentaire). Dans deux essais, les femmes ont reçu des messages textuels automatiques. Nous n'avons pas identifié d'essais comparant différents types de soutien par téléphone (par exemple, messages texte versus appels individuels). Tous les essais sauf un ont été effectués dans des pays à haut revenu. La majorité des études ont examiné le soutien dispensé via des conversations téléphoniques entre les femmes et les professionnels de santé même si un petit nombre d'essais ont inclus le soutien par téléphone dispensé par des pairs. De nombreux résultats parmi ceux décrits dans la revue sont basés sur les conclusions tirées d'une ou deux études seulement. Globalement, les résultats étaient contradictoires et peu probants. Il est possible que le soutien par téléphone augmente la satisfaction globale des femmes vis-à-vis de leurs soins pendant la grossesse et la période postnatale ; même si les résultats pour les deux périodes provenaient de deux études seulement. Il n'existait aucune preuve probante pour confirmer que le soutien par téléphone réduit l'anxiété pendant la grossesse ou après la naissance du bébé. Les preuves issues de deux essais ont montré que les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien avaient obtenu des scores de dépression moyens inférieurs pendant la période postnatale mais sans preuve probante que les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien étaient moins susceptibles d'avoir un diagnostic de dépression. Les résultats tirés des essais encourageant l'allaitement au sein par le biais d'un soutien par téléphone étaient également contradictoires, même s'il existait certaines preuves que le soutien par téléphone peut augmenter la durée de l'allaitement au sein. Il n'y avait aucune preuve solide indiquant que les femmes ayant bénéficié d'un soutien par téléphone étaient moins susceptibles de fumer à la fin de la grossesse ou pendant la période postnatale.

Pour les critères concernant les nourrissons, tels que la naissance prématurée et le poids à la naissance des nourrissons, dans l'ensemble, il existait très peu de preuves. Lorsque les données étaient disponibles, aucune différence nette n'a été observée entre les groupes.

Il subsiste une incertitude en ce qui concerne les bénéfices du soutien par téléphone et malgré certaines constatations encourageantes, les preuves sont insuffisantes pour recommander le recours systématique au soutien par téléphone chez les femmes ayant accès aux services de maternité.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Telefonska potpora za žene tijekom trudnoće i prvih šest tjedana nakon porođaja

Telefonska potpora za žene tijekom trudnoće i prvih šest tjedana nakon porođaja

Potpora putem telefona može biti korisna za žene s određenim problemima tijekom trudnoće i prvih šest tjedana nakon porođaja, ali nije jasno koje intervencije mogu biti učinkovite, koje nisu učinkovite, a koje mogu biti štetne.

Komunikacija telefonom sve više se prihvaća kao koristan oblik potpore u zdravstvu, te se danas u skrbi za trudnice i majke sve češće koriste telefonske linije potpore.

U ovom Cochrane sustavnom pregledu uključeni su rezultati iz 27 kliničkih studija, u koje je bilo uključeno više od 12.000 žena. Sva istraživanja ispitala su telefonsku potporu u usporedbi s uobičajenom skrbi (bez dodatne telefonske potpore). U dva istraživanja žene su primale automatizirane tekstualne poruke. Nisu pronađena istraživanja u kojima su međusobno uspoređene različite vrste telefonske potpore (primjerice, primanje poruka na mobitel u usporedbi s telefonskim razgovorom). Svi osim jednog istraživanja provedeni su u bogatijim zemljama. Većina studija istražila je potporu koju ženama putem telefona pružaju zdravstveni profesionalci, dok su u manjem broju istraživanja potporu telefonom pružale žene koje nisu bile zdravstveni djelatnici. Većina rezultata opisanih u ovom sustavnom pregledu odnosi se na rezultate iz svega jedne ili dvije studije, jer su, ukupno promatrano, rezultati bili neujednačeni i nisu dali jasni zaključak.

Utvrđeno je da potpora putem telefona može povećati ukupno zadovoljstvo žene njenom skrbi tijekom trudnoće i nakon porođaja, iako su rezultati za ova dva razdoblja dobiveni u dvjema odvojenim studijama. Nije bilo ujednačenih dokaza koji bi potvrdili da telefonska potpora smanjuje anksioznost tijekom trudnoće ili nakon rođenja djeteta. Dokazi iz dva istraživanja pokazuju da žene koje primaju potporu telefonom imaju manju razinu depresije nakon porođaja, ali bez jasnih dokaza da su žene koje nisu primale potporu telefonom imale veću vjerojatnost da im se dijagnosticira depresija. Rezultati iz istraživanja o poticanju žene na dojenje preko telefona također nisu dali ujednačene rezultate. Nije bilo čvrstih dokaza da je manja vjerojatnost da će žene pušiti do kraja trudnoće ili nakon porođaja ako primaju telefonsku potporu. Za ishode djeteta, kao što su prijevremeno rođenje, ili porođajna težina, bilo je malo dokaza. Kad su ti ishodi i istraženi u studijama, nije bilo jasnih razlika između skupine žena koje su primale telefonsku potporu i onih koje nisu.

Zaključak je da i dalje ostaju dvojbe o koristi telefonske potpore kod trudnica i nakon porođaja. Usprkos određenim ohrabrujućim rezultatima, u ovom trenutku nema dovoljno dokaza da bi se moglo preporučiti uvođenje telefonske potpore za žene koje su trudne ili su upravo rodile.

Translation notes

Translated by: Croatian Branch of the Italian Cochrane Centre