Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions to improve water quality and supply, sanitation and hygiene practices, and their effects on the nutritional status of children

  1. Alan D Dangour1,*,
  2. Louise Watson1,
  3. Oliver Cumming2,
  4. Sophie Boisson3,
  5. Yan Che4,
  6. Yael Velleman5,
  7. Sue Cavill6,
  8. Elizabeth Allen7,
  9. Ricardo Uauy1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Public Health Group

Published Online: 1 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009382.pub2

How to Cite

Dangour AD, Watson L, Cumming O, Boisson S, Che Y, Velleman Y, Cavill S, Allen E, Uauy R. Interventions to improve water quality and supply, sanitation and hygiene practices, and their effects on the nutritional status of children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD009382. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009382.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Department of Population Health, London, UK

  2. 2

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Environmental Health Group, London, UK

  3. 3

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Department of Disease Control, London, UK

  4. 4

    Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (SIPPR), Centre for Clinical Research and Training, Shanghai, China

  5. 5

    WaterAid, Policy and Campaigns, London, UK

  6. 6

    WaterAid, Technical Support Unit, London, UK

  7. 7

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Medical Statistics Department, London, UK

*Alan D Dangour, Department of Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK. Alan.Dangour@lshtm.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 1 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions are frequently implemented to reduce infectious diseases, and may be linked to improved nutrition outcomes in children.

Objectives

To evaluate the effect of interventions to improve water quality and supply (adequate quantity to maintain hygiene practices), provide adequate sanitation and promote handwashing with soap, on the nutritional status of children under the age of 18 years and to identify current research gaps.

Search methods

We searched 10 English-language (including MEDLINE and CENTRAL) and three Chinese-language databases for published studies in June 2012. We searched grey literature databases, conference proceedings and websites, reviewed reference lists and contacted experts and authors.

Selection criteria

Randomised (including cluster-randomised), quasi-randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, controlled cohort or cross-sectional studies and historically controlled studies, comparing WASH interventions among children aged under 18 years.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently sought and extracted data on childhood anthropometry, biochemical measures of micronutrient status, and adherence, attrition and costs either from published reports or through contact with study investigators. We calculated mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We conducted study-level and individual-level meta-analyses to estimate pooled measures of effect for randomised controlled trials only.

Main results

Fourteen studies (five cluster-randomised controlled trials and nine non-randomised studies with comparison groups) from 10 low- and middle-income countries including 22,241 children at baseline and nutrition outcome data for 9,469 children provided relevant information. Study duration ranged from 6 to 60 months and all studies included children under five years of age at the time of the intervention. Studies included WASH interventions either singly or in combination. Measures of child anthropometry were collected in all 14 studies, and nine studies reported at least one of the following anthropometric indices: weight-for-height, weight-for-age or height-for-age. None of the included studies were of high methodological quality as none of the studies masked the nature of the intervention from participants.

Weight-for-age, weight-for-height and height-for-age z-scores were available for five cluster-randomised controlled trials with a duration of between 9 and 12 months. Meta-analysis including 4,627 children identified no evidence of an effect of WASH interventions on weight-for-age z-score (MD 0.05; 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12). Meta-analysis including 4,622 children identified no evidence of an effect of WASH interventions on weight-for-height z-score (MD 0.02; 95% CI -0.07 to 0.11). Meta-analysis including 4,627 children identified a borderline statistically significant effect of WASH interventions on height-for-age z-score (MD 0.08; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.16). These findings were supported by individual participant data analysis including information on 5,375 to 5,386 children from five cluster-randomised controlled trials.

No study reported adverse events. Adherence to study interventions was reported in only two studies (both cluster-randomised controlled trials) and ranged from low (< 35%) to high (> 90%). Study attrition was reported in seven studies and ranged from 4% to 16.5%. Intervention cost was reported in one study in which the total cost of the WASH interventions was USD 15/inhabitant. None of the studies reported differential impacts relevant to equity issues such as gender, socioeconomic status and religion.

Authors' conclusions

The available evidence from meta-analysis of data from cluster-randomised controlled trials with an intervention period of 9-12 months is suggestive of a small benefit of WASH interventions (specifically solar disinfection of water, provision of soap, and improvement of water quality) on length growth in children under five years of age. The duration of the intervention studies was relatively short and none of the included studies is of high methodological quality. Very few studies provided information on intervention adherence, attrition and costs. There are several ongoing trials in low-income country settings that may provide robust evidence to inform these findings.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

The effect of interventions to improve water quality and supply, provide sanitation and promote handwashing with soap on physical growth in children

In low-income countries an estimated 165 million children under the age of five years suffer from chronic undernutrition causing them to be short in height and 52 million children suffer from acute undernutrition causing them to be very thin. Poor growth in early life increases the risks of illness and death in childhood. The two immediate causes of childhood undernutrition are inadequate dietary intake and infectious diseases such as diarrhoea. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions are frequently implemented to reduce infectious diseases; this review evaluates the effect that WASH interventions may have on nutrition outcomes in children. The review includes evidence from randomised and non-randomised interventions designed to (i) improve the microbiological quality of drinking water or protect the microbiological quality of water prior to consumption; (ii) introduce new or improved water supply or improve distribution; (iii) introduce or expand the coverage and use of facilities designed to improve sanitation; or (iv) promote handwashing with soap after defecation and disposal of child faeces, and prior to preparing and handling food, or a combination of these interventions, in children aged under 18 years.

We identified 14 studies of such interventions involving 22,241 children at baseline and nutrition outcome data for 9,469 children. Meta-analyses of the evidence from the cluster-randomised trials suggests that WASH interventions confer a small benefit on growth in children under five years of age. While potentially important, this conclusion is based on relatively short-term studies, none of which is of high methodological quality, and should therefore be treated with caution. There are several large, robust studies underway in low-income country settings that should provide evidence to inform these findings.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer la qualité de l'eau et l'approvisionnement en eau, les pratiques sanitaires et hygiéniques, et leurs effets sur l'état nutritionnel des enfants

Contexte

Des interventions Eau, assainissement et hygiène (programmes WASH de l'UNICEF) sont fréquemment mises en place pour réduire les maladies infectieuses, et peuvent être associés à l'amélioration des résultats nutritionnels chez les enfants.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'effet des interventions visant à améliorer la qualité de l'eau et l'approvisionnement en eau (quantité nécessaire pour assurer les pratiques sanitaires), assurer des conditions sanitaires convenables et encourager le lavage des mains au savon, sur l'état nutritionnel des enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans et identifier les lacunes concernant la recherche actuelle.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans 10 bases de données en langue anglaise (y compris MEDLINE et CENTRAL) et 3 bases de données en langue chinoise pour trouver des études publiées en juin 2012. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données de la littérature grise, les actes de conférences et les sites Internet, passé en revue les listes bibliographiques et contacté des experts et des auteurs d'étude.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (incluant les essais randomisés en grappes), quasi-randomisés et non randomisés, les études de cohortes contrôlées ou croisées et les études historiquement contrôlées, comparant les interventions WASH (programmes WASH de l'UNICEF : Eau, assainissement et hygiène) parmi les enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment recherché et extrait les données sur les mesures anthropométriques et biochimiques de l'état micro-nutritionnel chez les enfants, et sur le respect de l'intervention, l'attrition et les coûts soit dans les rapports publiés soit en contactant les investigateurs des études. Nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) avec intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Nous avons réalisé des méta-analyses au niveau des études et au niveau des individus afin d'estimer les mesures regroupées de l'effet pour les essais contrôlés randomisés uniquement.

Résultats Principaux

Quatorze études (cinq essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes et neuf études non randomisées avec des groupes de comparaison) menées dans 10 pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire impliquant 22 241 enfants à l'état basal et incluant des données sur les résultats nutritionnels pour 9 469 enfants ont fourni des informations pertinentes. La durée des études variait de 6 à 60 mois et toutes les études ont inclus des enfants âgés de moins de cinq ans au moment de l'intervention. Les études comprenaient des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) seules ou en association. Des mesures anthropométriques des enfants ont été recueillies dans la totalité des 14 études, et neuf études ont rapporté au moins l'un des indices anthropométriques suivants : poids pour taille, poids pour âge et taille pour âge. Aucune des études incluses ne présentait une grande qualité méthodologique puisque aucune des cinq études n'avait masqué la nature de l'intervention pour les participants.

Les scores z pour les indices poids pour âge, poids pour taille et taille pour âge étaient disponibles pour cinq essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes d'une durée comprise entre 9 et 12 mois. La méta-analyse incluant 4 627 enfants n'a pas permis d'identifier des preuves d'un effet des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) sur le score z pour l'indice poids pour âge (DM 0,05 ; IC à 95 % -0,01 à 0,12). La méta-analyse incluant 4 622 enfants n'a pas permis d'identifier des preuves d'un effet des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) sur le score z pour l'indice poids pour taille (DM 0,02 ; IC à 95 % -0,07 à 0,11). La méta-analyse incluant 4 627 enfants a permis d'identifier un effet marginal statistiquement significatif des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) sur le score z pour l'indice taille pour âge (DM 0,08 ; IC à 95 % 0,00 à 0,16). Ces observations ont été corroborées par l'analyse des données individuelles des participants intégrant des informations sur 5 375 à 5 386 enfants inclus dans cinq essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes.

Aucune étude ne signalait des événements indésirables. Le respect des interventions des études a été indiqué uniquement dans deux études (toutes deux étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes) et variait de faible (< 35 %) à grand (> 90 %). Le taux d'attrition d'étude a été rapporté dans sept études et variait de 4 % à 16,5 %. Le coût des interventions a été rapporté dans une seule étude dans laquelle le coût total des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) était de 15 dollars US/habitant. Aucune des études n'a rendu compte de répercussions différentielles pertinentes pour les questions d'équité telles que le sexe, la catégorie socioéconomique et la religion.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves disponibles issues de la méta-analyse des données recueillies dans les essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes ayant une période d'intervention de 9 à 12 mois, laissent entendre qu'il existe un petit bénéfice des interventions WASH (Eau, assainissement et hygiène) (spécifiquement la désinfection par l'énergie solaire de l'eau, la fourniture de savon et l'amélioration de la qualité de l'eau) sur le développement de la taille chez les enfants âgés de moins de cinq ans. La durée des études portant sur des interventions était relativement courte et aucune des études incluses ne présente une grande qualité méthodologique. Très peu d'études ont fourni des données sur le respect de l'intervention, l'attrition et les coûts. Plusieurs études sont actuellement en cours dans des pays à revenu faible et devraient fournir des données solides permettant d'orienter la pratique courante par rapport à ces résultats.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer la qualité de l'eau et l'approvisionnement en eau, les pratiques sanitaires et hygiéniques, et leurs effets sur l'état nutritionnel des enfants

Effet des interventions visant à améliorer la qualité de l'eau et l'approvisionnement en eau, garantir des conditions d'hygiène publique et encourager le lavage des mains au savon, sur la croissance physique des enfants

Dans les pays à revenu faible, on estime à 165 millions le nombre d'enfants de moins de cinq ans qui souffrent de sous-nutrition chronique qui entraîne un retard de croissance physique, c'est-à-dire qu'ils sont trop petits pour leur âge, et à 52 millions le nombre d'enfants qui souffrent de sous-nutrition aiguë qui les rend émaciés, c'est-à-dire qu'ils sont trop maigres pour leur taille. Une croissance insuffisante au tout début de la vie augmente les risques de maladie et de décès pendant l'enfance. Les deux causes immédiates de la sous-nutrition infantile sont un apport alimentaire insuffisant et des maladies infectieuses telles que la diarrhée. Des interventions Eau, assainissement et hygiène (programmes WASH de l'UNICEF) sont fréquemment mises en place pour réduire les maladies infectieuses ; cette revue évalue l'effet que les interventions WASH peuvent avoir sur les résultats nutritionnels chez les enfants. La revue inclut les données issues des interventions randomisées et non randomisées conçues pour (i) améliorer la qualité microbiologique de l'eau potable ou protéger la qualité microbiologique de l'eau avant sa consommation ; (ii) introduire un nouvel approvisionnement en eau ou un approvisionnement en eau amélioré ou améliorer la distribution ; (iii) introduire ou élargir la couverture et l'utilisation des installations conçues pour améliorer l'hygiène publique ; ou (iv) encourager le lavage des mains au savon après avoir fait ses besoins et éliminé les déchets des enfants, et avant de préparer et de manipuler la nourriture, ou une combinaison de ces interventions, chez les enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans.

Nous avons identifié 14 études portant sur ce type d'interventions impliquant 22 241 enfants à l'état basal et incluant des données sur les critères nutritionnels pour 9 469 enfants. Les méta-analyses des données issues des essais randomisés en grappes suggèrent que les interventions WASH confèrent un petit bénéfice à la croissance chez les enfants âgés de moins de cinq ans. Même si elle est potentiellement importante, cette conclusion est fondée sur des études relativement à court terme, parmi lesquelles aucune ne présente une grande qualité méthodologique, et doit par conséquent être considérée avec prudence. Plusieurs études robustes à grande échelle sont actuellement en cours dans des pays à revenu faible et devraient fournir des données permettant d'orienter la pratique courante par rapport à ces résultats.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.