Intervention Review

Helminth therapy (worms) for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease

  1. Sushil K Garg1,*,
  2. Ashley M Croft2,
  3. Peter Bager3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group

Published Online: 20 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009400.pub2


How to Cite

Garg SK, Croft AM, Bager P. Helminth therapy (worms) for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009400. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009400.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Minnesota, Department of Surgery, Minneapolis, MN, USA

  2. 2

    Ministry of Defence, Surgeon General's Department, London, UK

  3. 3

    Statens Serum Institut, Department of Epidemiology Research, Copenhagen, Denmark

*Sushil K Garg, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, Mayo Mail Code 195, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. sushilaiims@gmail.com. kumar154@umn.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 20 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, globally-occurring gastrointestinal disorder and a major cause of illness and disability. It is conventionally classified into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Helminths are parasitic worms with complex life cycles involving tissue- or lumen-dwelling stages in their hosts, and causing long-lasting or chronic infections that are frequently asymptomatic. Helminths modulate immune responses of their hosts, and many observational and experimental studies support the hypothesis that helminths suppress immune-mediated chronic inflammation that occurs in asthma, allergy and IBD.

Objectives

The objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of helminth treatment for induction of remission in IBD.

Search methods

We searched the following databases from inception to 13 July 2013: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease Group Specialized Trials Register. We also searched four online trials registries, and abstracts from major meetings. There were no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where the intervention was any helminth species or combination of helminth species, administered in any dose and by any route and for any duration of exposure to people with active CD or UC, confirmed through any combination of clinical, endoscopic and histological criteria were eligible for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data and assessed eligibility using a standardized data collection form. We used the RevMan software for analyses. The primary outcome was induction of remission as defined by the included studies. Secondary outcomes included clinical, histologic, or endoscopic improvement as defined by the authors, endoscopic mucosal healing, change in disease activity index score, change in quality of life score, hospital admissions, requirement for intravenous corticosteroids, surgery, study withdrawal and the incidence of adverse events. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes. We assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting each outcome was assessed using the GRADE criteria.

Main results

Two RCTs (90 participants) were included. One trial assessed the efficacy and safety of Trichuris suis (T. suis) ova in patients with UC (n = 54). The other RCT was a phase one that assessed the safety and tolerability of T. suis ova in patients with CD (n = 36). The risk of bias in both studies was judged to be low. In the UC study, during the 12-week study period, participants in the active arm received 2-weekly aliquots of 2500 T. suis eggs, added to 0.8 mL of saline; those in the placebo arm received 0.8 mL saline only. There were sparse data available for the outcomes clinical remission and clinical improvement. Ten per cent (3/30) of patients in the T. suis arm entered remission compared to 4% (1/24) of patients in the placebo arm (RR 2.40, 95% CI 0.27 to 21.63). Forty-three per cent (13/30) of patients in the T. suis group achieved clinical improvement compared to 17% (4/24) of placebo patients (RR 2.60, 95% CI 0.97 to 6.95). The mean ulcerative colitis disease activity index (UCDAI) score was lower in the T. suis group (6.1 +/- 0.61) compared to the placebo group (7.5 +/- 0.66) after 12 weeks of treatment (MD -1.40, 95% CI -1.75 to -1.05). There was only limited evidence relating to the proportion of patients who experienced an adverse event. Three per cent (1/30) of patients in the T. suis group experienced at least one adverse event compared to 12% (3/24) of placebo patients (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.03 to 2.40). None of the adverse events reported in this study were judged to be related to the study treatment. GRADE analyses rated the overall quality of the evidence for the primary and secondary outcomes (i.e. clinical remission and improvement) as low due to serious imprecision. In the CD study, participants received a single treatment of T. suis ova at a dosage of 500 (n = 9), 2500 (n = 9), or 7500 (n = 9) embryonated eggs or matching placebo (n = 9). The CD study did not assess clinical remission or improvement as outcomes. There were sparse data on adverse events at two weeks. Thirty-seven per cent (10/27) of patients in the T. suis group experienced at least one adverse event compared to 44% (4/9) of placebo patients (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.35 to 2.01). Only one adverse event (dysgeusia) was judged to be possibly related to treatment in this study. Dysgeusia was reported in one patient in the T. suis group and in one patient in the placebo group.

Authors' conclusions

Currently, there is insufficient evidence to allow any firm conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of helminths used to treat patients with IBD. The evidence for our primary efficacy outcomes in this review comes from one small study and is of low quality due to serious imprecision. We do not have enough evidence to determine whether helminths are safe when used in patients with UC and CD. Further RCTs are required to assess the efficacy and safety of helminth therapy in IBD.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Helminth therapy (worms) for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is comprised of two disorders: ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. These disorders have both distinct and overlapping symptoms, but the underlying cause remains incompletely understood. Standard therapy for IBD includes sulfasalazine, 5-ASA drugs, steroids, immunosuppressives such as azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate and biological agents such as infliximab. Helminths are worm-like parasites, that inhabit larger organisms. Helminths cause changes in the immune systems of their hosts including an altered immunological response to antigens and this has implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease which is thought to be caused by immune dysregulation.

The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness and safety of helminth therapy for inducing remission in people with IBD. This review identified two randomised controlled trials including a total of 90 participants. One study compared twice weekly treatment with helminths (an 0.8 mL solution containing 2500 live eggs of the helminth Trichuris suis) for 12 weeks to a matching placebo (an 0.8 ml identical looking solution with no Trichuris suis eggs) in 54 patients with active ulcerative colitis. Few remissions occurred during the trial and helminth treatment had no detectable effect on these remissions. Ten per cent (3/30) of patients in the helminth group achieved remission compared to four per cent (1/24) of placebo patients. A higher proportion of patients in the helminth group (43% or 13/30) improved clinically compared to the placebo group (17% or 4/24). However, this difference could be a chance effect. We could not determine whether the proportion of patients who had a side effect was higher in either group. No observed side effects were thought to be related to treatment were reported in this study. The other study compared one treatment with various doses of helminths (a solution of 500, 2500 or 7500 Trichuris suis eggs) to a matching placebo in 36 patients with Crohn's disease. This study was designed to assess side effects and did not measure clinical remission or improvement. There amount of information available on side-effects at two weeks was limited and the results were uncertain due to the small number of participants in the study. The only side effect that was judged to be possibly related to the study treatment was dysgeusia (a distortion of the sense of taste). This was reported in one patient in the helminth group and in one patient in the placebo group. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to allow any firm conclusions regarding the effectiveness and safety of helminths used to treat patients with IBD. The only information available relating to clinical improvement in patients with active ulcerative colitis comes from one small study. We do not know how safe helminths are when used in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Further randomised controlled trials are required to assess the efficacy and safety of helminth therapy in IBD.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Thérapie par helminthes (vers) pour l’induction d’une rémission dans la maladie intestinale inflammatoire

Contexte

La maladie intestinale inflammatoire (MII) est un trouble gastro-intestinal chronique contracté à l’échelle mondiale et est une cause majeure de maladie et d'invalidité. Il est généralement classé dans la maladie de Crohn (MC) et la colite ulcéreuse (CU). Les helminthes sont des vers parasites avec des cycles de vie complexes impliquant des étapes dans les tissus – ou dans les organes creux – de leurs hôtes et provoquant des infections de longue durée ou chroniques qui sont souvent asymptomatiques. Les helminthes modulent les réponses immunitaires de leurs hôtes et de nombreuses études observationnelles et expérimentales confirment l'hypothèse selon laquelle les helminthes suppriment l’inflammation immunitaire chronique qui se produit lors d’asthme, d'allergie et de MII.

Objectifs

L'objectif était d'évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité du traitement par helminthes pour l'induction d'une rémission dans les MII.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes depuis leur création jusqu'au 13 juillet 2013 : MEDLINE, EMBASE, le registre Cochrane central des essais contrôlés et le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies inflammatoires. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans quatre registres d'essais cliniques en ligne et dans les résumés des principales conférences. Aucune restriction concernant la langue n’a été appliquée.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), où l'intervention portait sur n’importe quelle espèce d'helminthes ou une combinaison d'espèces d'helminthes, administrée sous n'importe quelle dose, par n’importe quelle voie et pendant n'importe quelle durée d'exposition aux personnes souffrant de MC ou de CU actives, confirmée par une combinaison de critères cliniques, endoscopiques et histologiques, étaient éligibles pour l'inclusion.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont extrait les données et évalué l'éligibilité à l'aide d'un formulaire standardisé de collecte de données. Nous avons utilisé le logiciel RevMan pour les analyses. Le critère de jugement principal était l'induction d'une rémission telle que définie par les études incluses. Les critères de jugement secondaires incluaient les améliorations cliniques, histologiques ou endoscopiques telles que définies par les auteurs, la cicatrisation de la muqueuse endoscopique, le changement de résultat sur l’indice d'activité de la maladie, le changement de résultat sur la qualité de vie, les admissions à l'hôpital, le besoin de corticoïdes par voie intraveineuse, la chirurgie, les arrêts prématurés de l'étude et l'incidence des effets indésirables. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) et les intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour les résultats dichotomiques. Nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) et l’IC à 95 % pour les résultats continus. Nous avons évalué la qualité méthodologique des études incluses à l'aide de l'outil Cochrane de risque de biais. La qualité globale des preuves, étayant chaque résultat, a été évaluée selon les critères GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Deux ECR (90 participants) ont été inclus. Un essai évaluait l'efficacité et l'innocuité des ovulesTrichuris suis (T. suis) chez les patients atteints de CU (n = 54). L'autre ECR était une phase I ayant évalué l'innocuité et la tolérabilité des ovules T. Suis chez les patients atteints de MC (n = 36). Le risque de biais dans les deux études a été jugé faible. Dans l’étude sur la CU, pendant la période d'étude de 12 semaines, les participants dans le bras actifs avaient reçu toutes les 2 semaines des aliquotes de 2500 ovules de T. suis, ajoutées à une solution saline de 0,8 ml; ceux du groupe placebo ont uniquement reçu une solution saline de 0,8 ml. Les données disponibles pour les critères de jugement de rémission clinique et l'amélioration clinique étaient limitées. 10% (3/30) des patients dans le groupe T. suis présentaient une rémission comparé à 4% (1/24) des patients dans le groupe placebo (RR 2,40, IC à 95 % 0,27 à 21,63). 43% (13/30) des patients dans le groupe T. suis ont obtenu une amélioration clinique par rapport à 17% (4/24) des patients sous placebo (RR 2,60, IC à 95 % 0,97 à 6,95). La moyenne de l’indice d'activité de la colite ulcéreuse (UCDAI) était plus faible dans le groupe T. Suis (6,1 +/- 0,61) par rapport au groupe placebo (7,5 +/- 0,66) après 12 semaines de traitement (DM -1,40, IC à 95 % -1,75 à -1,05). Il n'y avait que des preuves limitées relatives à la proportion de patients ayant subi un effet indésirable. 3% (1/30) des patients dans le groupe T. suis ont ressenti au moins un effet indésirable, contre 12% (3/24) des patients sous placebo (RR 0,27, IC à 95% 0,03 à 2,40). Aucun des effets indésirables rapportés dans cette étude n’a été considéré comme étant lié au traitement. Les analyses GRADE évaluaient la qualité globale des preuves pour les critères de jugement principaux et secondaires (c'est-à-dire une rémission clinique et une amélioration) comme faible en raison d’imprécisions graves. Dans l’étude de MC, les participants ont reçu un traitement unique d’ovules de T. suis à une dose d’œufs embryonnés de 500 (n = 9), 2 500 (n = 9), ou 7 500 (n = 9) ou à un placebo correspondant (n = 9). L’étude de MC n'a pas évalué la rémission ou l'amélioration clinique en tant que critères de jugement. Les données sur les effets indésirables à deux semaines étaient insuffisantes. 37% (10/27) des patients dans le groupe T. suis ont ressenti au moins un effet indésirable, contre 44% (4/9) des patients sous placebo (RR 0,83, IC à 95 % 0,35 à 2,01). Dans cette étude, seul un effet indésirable (dysgueusie) a été jugé être probablement lié au traitement. La dysgueusie a été rapportée chez un patient dans le groupe T. suis et chez un patient dans le groupe sous placebo.

Conclusions des auteurs

Actuellement, il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour pouvoir apporter des conclusions définitives concernant l'efficacité et l'innocuité des helminthes utilisés pour traiter les patients atteints de MII. Les preuves pour nos principaux résultats d'efficacité dans cette revue proviennent d'une étude de petite taille et sont de faible qualité en raison de graves imprécisions. Nous ne disposons pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer si les helminthes sont sans danger quand ils sont utilisés chez les patients atteints de CU et de MC. D’autres ECR sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la thérapie par helminthes chez les MII.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Thérapie par helminthes (vers) pour l’induction d’une rémission dans la maladie intestinale inflammatoire

Thérapie par helminthes (vers) pour l’induction d’une rémission dans la maladie intestinale inflammatoire

La maladie intestinale inflammatoire (MII) est constituée de deux troubles : la colite ulcéreuse et la maladie de Crohn. Ces troubles possèdent des symptômes distincts et communs, mais la cause sous-jacente reste que partiellement comprise. Le traitement standard de la MII comprend la sulfasalazine, les médicaments 5 -ASA, les stéroïdes, les immunosuppresseurs, tels que l'azathioprine, 6 -mercaptopurine et le méthotrexate et des agents biologiques, tels que l'infliximab. Les helminthes sont des parasites en forme de vers qui peuplent de plus grands organismes. Les helminthes provoquent des changements dans le système immunitaire de leurs hôtes, y compris une modification de la réaction immunologique aux antigènes et cela engendre des implications pour le traitement de la maladie inflammatoire de l'intestin qui serait provoquée par des troubles immunitaires.

L'objectif de cette revue systématique était d'examiner l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la thérapie par helminthes pour induire une rémission chez les patients atteints de MII. Cette revue a identifié deux essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur un total de 90 participants. Deux fois par semaine, une étude a comparé le traitement par helminthes (solution de 0,8 ml contenant 2 500 ovules vivantes d’helminthes Trichuris suis) pendant 12 semaines par rapport à un placebo (une solution identique de 0,8 ml de solution sans ovules Trichuris suis) chez 54 patients souffrant d'une colite ulcéreuse active. Peu de rémissions sont survenues au cours de l'essai et le traitement par helminthes n'avait aucun effet notable sur ces rémissions. Dix pour cent (3/30) des patients dans le groupe des helminthes ont obtenu une rémission, comparés à 4% (1/24) des patients sous placebo. Une plus grande proportion de patients dans le groupe des helminthes (43 % ou 13/30) présentait une amélioration clinique par rapport au groupe du placebo (17 % ou 4/24). Cependant, cette différence pourrait être un effet de chance. Nous n'avons pas pu déterminer si la proportion de patients ayant eu un effet secondaire était plus élevée dans l’un des groupes. Aucun des effets secondaires observés, supposés être lié au traitement, n’était rapporté dans cette étude. L'autre étude comparait un traitement avec différentes doses d'helminthes (une solution de 500, 2 500 ou 7 500 ovules Trichuris suis) à un placebo correspondant chez 36 patients atteints de maladie de Crohn. Cette étude a été conçue pour évaluer les effets secondaires et ne mesurait pas de rémission clinique ou d’amélioration. La quantité d'informations disponibles concernant les effets secondaires à deux semaines était limitée et les résultats étaient incertains en raison du petit nombre de participants dans l'étude. Le seul effet secondaire qui était jugé être potentiellement lié au traitement de l'étude était la dysgueusie (une distorsion de la sensation du goût). Cela a été rapporté chez un patient dans le groupe des helminthes et chez un patient dans le groupe sous placebo. Actuellement, il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour pouvoir apporter des conclusions définitives concernant l'efficacité et l'innocuité des helminthes utilisés pour traiter les patients atteints de MII. Les seules informations disponibles concernant l'amélioration clinique chez les patients souffrant d'une colite ulcéreuse active proviennent d'une étude de petite taille. Nous ne savons pas dans quelle mesure les helminthes sont sûrs lorsqu'ils sont utilisés chez les patients atteints de colite ulcéreuse et de la maladie de Crohn. Des essais contrôlés randomisés supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la thérapie par helminthes chez les MII.

La maladie intestinale inflammatoire (MII) est un trouble gastro-intestinal chronique contracté à l’échelle mondiale et est une cause majeure de maladie et d'invalidité. Il est généralement classé dans la maladie de Crohn (MC) et la colite ulcéreuse (CU). Les helminthes sont des vers parasites avec des cycles de vie complexes impliquant des étapes dans les tissus – ou dans les organes creux – de leurs hôtes et provoquant des infections de longue durée ou chroniques qui sont souvent asymptomatiques. Les helminthes modulent les réponses immunitaires de leurs hôtes et de nombreuses études observationnelles et expérimentales confirment l'hypothèse selon laquelle les helminthes suppriment l’inflammation immunitaire chronique qui se produit lors d’asthme, d'allergie et de MII.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé