Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Zinc supplements for treating thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

  1. Kye Mon Min Swe1,*,
  2. Adinegara BL Abas1,
  3. Amit Bhardwaj2,
  4. Ankur Barua3,
  5. N S Nair4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group

Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 20 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009415.pub2

How to Cite

Swe KMM, Abas ABL, Bhardwaj A, Barua A, Nair NS. Zinc supplements for treating thalassaemia and sickle cell disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD009415. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009415.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Department of Community Medicine, Melaka, Malaysia

  2. 2

    Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Department of Orthopaedics, Melaka, Melaka, Malaysia

  3. 3

    International Medical University (IMU), Department of Community Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

  4. 4

    Manipal University, Department of Statistics, Manipal, Karnataka, India

*Kye Mon Min Swe, Department of Community Medicine, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Jalan Batu Hampar, Bukit Baru, Melaka, 75150, Malaysia. khmoneminswe@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Haemoglobinopathies, inherited disorders of haemoglobin synthesis (thalassaemia) or structure (sickle cell disease), are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The WHO estimates that, globally, 5% of adults are carriers of a haemoglobin condition, 2.9% are carriers of thalassaemia and 2.3% are carriers of sickle cell disease. Carriers are found worldwide as a result of migration of various ethnic groups to different regions of the world. Zinc is an easily available supplement and intervention programs have been carried out to prevent deficiency in people with thalassaemia or sickle cell anaemia. It is important to evaluate the role of zinc supplementation in the treatment of thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia to reduce deaths due to complications.

Objectives

To assess the effect of zinc supplementation in the treatment of thalassaemia and sickle cell disease.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.

Date of most recent search: 01 February 2013.

Selection criteria

Randomised, placebo-controlled trials of zinc supplements for treating thalassaemia or sickle cell disease administered at least once a week for at least a month.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors assessed the eligibility and risk of bias of the included trials, extracted and analysed data and wrote the review. We summarised results using risk ratios or rate ratios for dichotomous data and mean differences for continuous data. We combined trial results where appropriate.

Main results

We identified nine trials for inclusion with all nine contributing outcome data. Two trials reported on people with thalassaemia (n = 152) and seven on sickle cell anaemia (n = 307).

In people with thalassaemia, in one trial, the serum zinc level value showed no difference between the zinc supplemented group and the control group, mean difference 47.40 (95% confidence interval -12.95 to 107.99). Regarding anthropometry, in one trial, height velocity was significantly increased in patients who received zinc supplementation for one to seven years duration, mean difference 3.37 (95% confidence interval 2.36 to 4.38) (total number of participants = 26). In one trial, however, there was no difference in body mass index between treatment groups.

Zinc acetate supplementation for three months (in one trial) and one year (in two trials) (total number of participants = 71) was noted to increase the serum zinc level significantly in patients with sickle cell anaemia, mean difference 14.90 (95% confidence interval 6.94 to 22.86) and 20.25 (95% confidence interval 11.73 to 28.77) respectively. There was no significant difference in haemoglobin level between intervention and control groups, at either three months (one trial) or one year (one trial), mean difference 0.06 (95% confidence interval -0.84 to 0.96) and mean difference -0.07 (95% confidence interval -1.40 to 1.26) respectively. Regarding anthropometry, one trial showed no significant changes in body mass index or weight after one year of zinc acetate supplementation. In patients with sickle cell disease, the total number of sickle cell crises at one year were significantly decreased in the zinc sulphate supplemented group as compared to controls, mean difference -2.83 (95% confidence interval -3.51 to -2.15) (total participants 130), but not in zinc acetate group, mean difference 1.54 (95% confidence interval -2.01 to 5.09) (total participants 22). In one trial at three months and another at one year, the total number of clinical infections were significantly decreased in the zinc supplemented group as compared to controls, mean difference 0.05 (95% confidence interval 0.01 - 0.43) (total number of participants = 36), and mean difference -7.64 (95% confidence interval -10.89 to -4.39) (total number of participants = 21) respectively.

Authors' conclusions

According to the results, there is no evidence from randomised controlled trials to indicate any benefit of zinc supplementation with regards to serum zinc level in patients with thalassaemia. However, height velocity was noted to increase among those who received this intervention.

There is mixed evidence on the benefit of using zinc supplementation in people with sickle cell disease. For instance, there is evidence that zinc supplementation for one year increased the serum zinc levels in patients with sickle cell disease. However, though serum zinc level was raised in patients receiving zinc supplementation, haemoglobin level and anthropometry measurements were not significantly different between groups. Evidence of benefit is seen with the reduction in the number of sickle cell crises among sickle cell patients who received one year of zinc sulphate supplementation and with the reduction in the total number of clinical infections among sickle cell patients who received zinc supplementation for both three months and for one year.

The conclusion is based on the data from a small group of trials,which were generally of good quality, with a low risk of bias. The authors recommend that more trials on zinc supplementation in thalassaemia and sickle cell disease be conducted given that the literature has shown the benefits of zinc in these types of diseases.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Zinc supplements for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

Zinc is an essential micronutrient, which is needed so that the immune system works at its best and helps the body fight off infection. People may not get enough zinc from food alone. Researchers have therefore looked at zinc supplements as a way of reducing anaemia and preventing infections and complications. The review authors searched the medical literature for randomised controlled studies in which people with sickle cell disease or thalassaemia received either zinc supplements or no supplements. We included nine trials in the review (459 participants). In people with thalassaemia, there is no evidence to indicate any benefit of zinc supplements on serum zinc level. However, there was an improvement in height in those who received the supplements. There is mixed evidence on the benefit of using zinc supplements in people with sickle cell disease. For instance, there is evidence that when supplements are given for one year the serum zinc levels increased; however, haemoglobin levels and body mass index did not differ significantly between groups. We also found that people with sickle cell disease who received zinc supplements (at both three months and at one year) had fewer sickle cell crises and infections. However, given that the total number of trials is small, these results should be treated with caution.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Suppléments de zinc pour traiter la thalassémie et la drépanocytose

Contexte

Les hémoglobinopathies, des troubles héréditaires de la synthèse (thalassémie) ou de la structure (drépanocytose) de l'hémoglobline, sont responsables d'une morbidité et d'une mortalité significatives dans le monde. L'OMS estime qu'à l'échelle mondiale, 5 % des adultes sont porteurs d'une maladie de l'hémoglobine, 2,9 % sont porteurs de la thalassémie et 2,3 % sont porteurs de la drépanocytose. Les porteurs sont présents dans le monde entier en raison de la migration de divers groupes ethniques vers différentes régions du monde. Le zinc est un supplément facile d'accès et des programmes d'intervention ont été mis en œuvre pour prévenir la carence chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie ou de drépanocytose. Il est important d'évaluer le rôle de la supplémentation en zinc dans le traitement de la thalassémie et de la drépanocytose pour réduire les décès dûs aux complications.

Objectifs

Evaluer l'effet de la supplémentation en zinc dans le traitement de la thalassémie et de la drépanocytose.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre des essais sur les hémoglobinopathies du groupe Cochrane sur la mucoviscidose et autres maladies génétiques qui comprend des références identifiées à partir de recherches exhaustives dans des bases de données électroniques et de recherches manuelles dans les journaux et les recueils de résumés d'actes de conférences pertinents.

Date de la recherche la plus récente : 01 février 2013.

Critères de sélection

Les essais randomisés, contrôlés par placebo, portant sur des suppléments de zinc pour traiter la thalassémie ou la drépanocytose, administrés au moins une fois par semaine pendant au moins un mois.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué l'éligibilité et le risque de biais des essais inclus ; ils ont extrait et analysé les données et rédigé la revue. Nous avons synthétisé les résultats à l'aide du risque relatif ou du taux de proportion pour les données dichotomiques, et de la différence moyenne pour les données continues. Lorsque cela était opportun nous avons combiné les résultats des essais.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié neuf essais à inclure et les neuf ont fourni des données de résultat. Deux essais ont porté sur les personnes atteintes de thalassémie (n = 152) et sept sur la drépanocytose (n = 307).

Chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie, dans un essai, la concentration sérique de zinc n'a montré aucune différence entre le groupe avec supplémentation en zinc et le groupe témoin, différence moyenne 47,40 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -12,95 à 107,99). Concernant l'anthropométrie, dans un essai, la vitesse de croissance a augmenté de façon significative chez les patients qui recevaient une supplémentation en zinc pendant un à sept ans, différence moyenne 3,37 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 2,36 à 4,38) (nombre total de participants = 26). Dans un essai, cependant, il n'y a eu aucune différence en termes d'indice de masse corporelle entre les groupes de traitement.

Il a été constaté qu'une supplémentation en acétate de zinc pendant trois mois (dans un essai) et un an (dans deux essais) (nombre total de participants = 71) augmentait la concentration sérique de zinc de façon significative chez les patients atteints de drépanocytose, différence moyenne 14,90 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 6,94 à 22,86) et 20,25 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 11,73 à 28,77) respectivement. Il n'y a eu aucune différence significative en termes de taux d'hémoglobine entre le groupe d'intervention et le groupe témoin, que ce soit à trois mois (un essai) ou à un an (un essai), différence moyenne 0,06 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -0,84 à 0,96) et différence moyenne -0,07 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -1,40 à 1,26) respectivement. Concernant l'anthropométrie, un essai n'a montré aucun changement significatif d'indice de masse corporelle ou de poids après un an de supplémentation en acétate de zinc. Chez les patients atteints de drépanocytose, le nombre total de crises drépanocytaires à un an a été diminué significativement dans le groupe avec supplémentation en sulfate de zinc comparé aux témoins, différence moyenne -2,83 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -3,51 à -2,15) (130 participants au total), mais pas dans le groupe recevant de l'acétate de zinc, différence moyenne 1,54 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -2,01 à 5,09) (22 participants au total). Dans un essai à trois mois et un autre à un an, le nombre total d'infections cliniques a été diminué significativement dans le groupe avec supplémentation en zinc comparé aux témoins, différence moyenne 0,05 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % 0,01 - 0,43) (nombre total de participants = 36) et différence moyenne -7,64 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % -10,89 à -4,39) (nombre total de participants = 21) respectivement.

Conclusions des auteurs

D'après les résultats, il n'existe pas de preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés indiquant un bénéfice de la supplémentation en zinc concernant la concentration sérique de zinc chez les patients atteints de thalassémie. Cependant, il a été constaté que la vitesse de croissance augmentait chez ceux ayant reçu cette intervention.

Il existe des preuves contradictoires concernant le bénéfice apporté par l'utilisation d'une supplémentation en zinc chez les personnes atteintes de drépanocytose. Par exemple, certaines preuves ont indiqué qu'une supplémentation en zinc pendant un an augmentait les concentrations sériques de zinc chez les patients atteints de drépanocytose. Toutefois, bien que la concentration sérique de zinc ait été accrue chez les patients recevant une supplémentation en zinc, le taux d'hémoglobine et les mesures anthropométriques n'ont pas été significativement différents entre les groupes. On observe des preuves de bénéfice avec la réduction du nombre de crises drépanocytaires chez les patients atteints de drépanocytose ayant reçu une supplémentation en sulfate de zinc pendant un an et avec la réduction du nombre total d'infections cliniques chez les patients atteints de drépanocytose ayant reçu une supplémentation en zinc tant pendant trois mois que pendant un an.

La conclusion se fonde sur les données issues d'un petit groupe d'essais qui étaient généralement de bonne qualité et présentaient un faible risque de biais. Les auteurs recommandent de réaliser d'autres essais sur la supplémentation en zinc dans la thalassémie et la drépanocytose étant donné que la littérature a montré les bénéfices du zinc dans ce type de maladies.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Suppléments de zinc pour traiter la thalassémie et la drépanocytose

Suppléments de zinc contre la thalassémie et la drépanocytose

Le zinc est un micronutriment essentiel qui est nécessaire pour que le système immunitaire fonctionne au mieux et aide l'organisme à se défendre contre les infections. Certaines personnes peuvent ne pas obtenir suffisamment de zinc à partir de leur seule alimentation. Les chercheurs ont donc examiné les suppléments de zinc comme moyen de réduire l'anémie et de prévenir les infections et les complications. Les auteurs de la revue ont recherché dans la littérature médicale des études contrôlées randomisées dans lesquelles des personnes atteintes de drépanocytose ou de thalassémie soit recevaient des suppléments de zinc soit ne recevaient aucun supplément. Nous avons inclus neuf essais dans la revue (459 participants). Chez les personnes atteintes de thalassémie, aucune preuve n'indique un bénéfice des suppléments de zinc concernant la concentration sérique de zinc. Cependant, on a observé une amélioration de la taille chez les personnes qui recevaient les suppléments. Il existe des preuves contradictoires concernant le bénéfice apporté par l'utilisation de suppléments de zinc chez les personnes atteintes de drépanocytose. Par exemple, certaines preuves indiquent qu'après avoir administré des suppléments pendant un an, les concentrations sériques de zinc ont augmenté ; toutefois, les taux d'hémoglobine et l'indice de masse corporel n'ont pas été significativement différents entre les groupes. Nous avons également découvert que les personnes atteintes de drépanocytose qui recevaient des suppléments de zinc (à la fois à trois mois et à un an) avaient moins de crises drépanocytaires et d'infections. Cependant, étant donné que le nombre total d'essais est faible, ces résultats doivent être traités avec précaution.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 7th August, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.