Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Psychosocial interventions for patients with head and neck cancer

  1. Cherith Semple1,*,
  2. Kader Parahoo2,
  3. Alyson Norman3,
  4. Eilis McCaughan2,
  5. Gerry Humphris4,
  6. Moyra Mills5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group

Published Online: 16 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009441.pub2


How to Cite

Semple C, Parahoo K, Norman A, McCaughan E, Humphris G, Mills M. Psychosocial interventions for patients with head and neck cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009441. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009441.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    South Eastern Health & Social Care Trust, Cancer Services, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

  2. 2

    University of Ulster, Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Coleraine, UK

  3. 3

    University of Plymouth, Psychology, Plymouth, UK

  4. 4

    University of St. Andrews, School of Medicine, Fife, Scotland, UK

  5. 5

    Northern Health and Social Care Trust, Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK

*Cherith Semple, Cancer Services, South Eastern Health & Social Care Trust, Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT16 1RH, UK. cherith.semple@setrust.hscni.net.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 16 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

A diagnosis of head and neck cancer, like many other cancers, can lead to significant psychosocial distress. Patients with head and neck cancer can have very specific needs, due to both the location of their disease and the impact of treatment, which can interfere with basic day-to-day activities such as eating, speaking and breathing. There is a lack of clarity on the effectiveness of the interventions developed to address the psychosocial distress experienced by patients living with head and neck cancer.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life and psychosocial well-being for patients with head and neck cancer.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the most recent search was 17 December 2012.

Selection criteria

We selected randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials of psychosocial interventions for adults with head and neck cancer. For trials to be included the psychosocial intervention had to involve a supportive relationship between a trained helper and individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer. Outcomes had to be assessed using a validated quality of life or psychological distress measure, or both.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected trials, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias, with mediation from a third author where required. Where possible, we extracted outcome measures for combining in meta-analyses. We compared continuous outcomes using either mean differences (MD) or standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with a random-effects model. We conducted meta-analyses for the primary outcome measure of quality of life and secondary outcome measures of psychological distress, including anxiety and depression. We subjected the remaining outcome measures (self esteem, coping, adjustment to cancer, body image) to a narrative synthesis, due to the limited number of studies evaluating these specific outcomes and the wide divergence of assessment tools used.

Main results

Seven trials, totaling 542 participants, met the eligibility criteria. Studies varied widely on risk of bias, interventions used and outcome measures reported. From these studies, there was no evidence to suggest that psychosocial intervention promotes global quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer at end of intervention (MD 1.23, 95% CI -5.82 to 8.27) as measured by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). This quality of life tool includes five functional scales, namely cognitive, physical, emotional, social and role. There was no evidence to demonstrate that psychosocial intervention provides an immediate or medium-term improvement on any of these five functional scales. From the data available, there was no significant change in levels of anxiety (SMD -0.09, 95% CI -0.40 to 0.23) or depression following intervention (SMD -0.03, 95% CI -0.24 to 0.19). At present, there is insufficient evidence to refute or support the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention for patients with head and neck cancer.

Authors' conclusions

The evidence for psychosocial intervention is limited by the small number of studies, methodological shortcomings such as lack of power, difficulties with comparability between types of interventions and a wide divergence in outcome measures used. Future research should be targeted at patients who screen positive for distress and use validated outcome measures, such as the EORTC scale, as a measure of quality of life. These studies should implement interventions that are theoretically derived. Other shortcomings should be addressed in future studies, including using power calculations that may encourage multi-centred collaboration to ensure adequate sample sizes are recruited.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Psychosocial interventions for patients with head and neck cancer

There is a steady rise in the number of people being diagnosed with head and neck cancer. It is more common in men over 60, but the incidence rate is rising, especially in younger adults (men and women under 40). Survival rates for some cancers in the head and neck area are over 50%. As a result, the quality of life of head and neck cancer patients and how they adjust to life after treatment are becoming increasingly important. Unfortunately life can change greatly for many people following treatment of head and neck cancer due to the obvious change in their appearance, or changes in how they speak and eat. Also, this patient group is known to have high rates of smoking and alcohol use. This combination of more people living with and surviving head and neck cancer, and the high degree of cancer-related issues, has led healthcare professionals to develop programmes to support patients with some of the problems they may experience after treatment. The focus of these programmes is often on addressing emotional or social problems related to the patient's cancer and they are known as 'psychosocial interventions'. This review examines the evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life or psychosocial well-being.

We identified seven studies, with a total of 542 adult patients who had head and neck cancer. However, many of the studies had shortcomings in their design or reporting. This has made it difficult to draw reliable conclusions.

Overall, this review did not find any improvement in general quality of life or in levels of anxiety and depression following psychosocial intervention.

In conclusion, there was limited good-quality evidence in this area, making it difficult to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions. Future good-quality research is required in this field and should target those in need of psychosocial intervention, in order to guide service development.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales destinées aux patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou

Contexte

Un diagnostic de cancer de la tête et du cou, comme de nombreux autres cancers, peut susciter une détresse psychosociale significative. Les patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou peuvent avoir des besoins très spécifiques, à la fois en raison de la localisation de leur maladie et de l'impact du traitement, qui peuvent perturber les activités quotidiennes de base telles que l'alimentation, l'élocution et la respiration. Un manque de clarté entoure l'efficacité des interventions développées en vue de répondre à la détresse psychosociale ressentie par les patients vivant avec un cancer de la tête et du cou.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des interventions psychosociales visant à améliorer la qualité de vie et le bien-être psychosocial chez les patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'otorhinolaryngologie, dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), ainsi que dans PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, ICTRP et d'autres sources afin de trouver des essais publiés et non publiés. La recherche la plus récente a été réalisée le lundi 17 décembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné des essais contrôlés randomisés et des essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés portant sur des interventions psychosociales destinées à des adultes atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou. Pour les essais à inclure, l'intervention psychosociale devait impliquer une relation de soutien entre un assistant formé et des individus diagnostiqués avec un cancer de la tête et du cou. Les critères de jugement devaient être évalués au moyen d'une mesure validée de la qualité de vie ou de la détresse psychosociale, ou des deux.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont, indépendamment, sélectionné les essais, extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais, avec la médiation d'un troisième auteur lorsque cela était nécessaire. Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons extrait les mesures des critères de jugement pour les combiner dans des méta-analyses. Nous avons comparé les données continues en utilisant soit les différences moyennes (DM) soit les différences moyennes standardisées (DMS) et des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %, avec un modèle à effets aléatoires. Nous avons réalisé des méta-analyses pour la mesure du critère de jugement principal, la qualité de vie, et les mesures des critères de jugement secondaires, la détresse psychologique, incluant l'anxiété et la dépression. Nous avons soumis les mesures des autres critères de jugement (estime de soi, adaptation, ajustement en fonction du cancer, image corporelle) à une synthèse narrative, compte tenu du nombre limité d'études évaluant ces critères spécifiques et de la grande divergence des outils d'évaluation utilisés.

Résultats Principaux

Sept essais, avec un total de 542 participants, remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Les études variaient considérablement au niveau du risque de biais, des interventions utilisées et des résultats mesurés rapportés. D'après ces études, il n'y avait aucune preuve pour suggérer que l'intervention psychosociale favorise la qualité de vie globale des patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou à la fin de l'intervention (DM 1,23, IC à 95 % -5,82 à 8,27) mesurée par le Questionnaire sur la Qualité de vie EORTC QLQ-C30 (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30). Cet outil d'évaluation de la qualité de vie inclut cinq échelles fonctionnelles, couvrant notamment les domaines cognitif, physique, affectif, social et du rôle en société. Il n'y avait aucune preuve pour affirmer que l'intervention psychosociale apporte une amélioration immédiate ou à moyen terme de l'une quelconque de ces cinq échelles fonctionnelles. D'après les données disponibles, aucune variation significative n'a été observée au niveau du degré d'anxiété (DMS -0,09, IC à 95 % -0,40 à 0,23) ou de dépression suite à l'intervention (DMS -0,03, IC à 95 % -0,24 à 0,19). À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a pas suffisamment de preuves pour récuser ou confirmer l'efficacité de l'intervention psychosociale chez les patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves en faveur de l'intervention psychosociale sont limitées par le faible nombre d'études, les lacunes méthodologiques telles que la puissance insuffisante, les difficultés de comparaison entre les types des interventions et une grande divergence entre les résultats mesurés utilisés. Les futures recherches devront cibler des patients qui sont positifs au test de dépistage de la détresse et utiliser des mesures validées de résultats, telles que l'échelle EORTC, comme mesure de la qualité de vie. Ces études devraient mettre en œuvre des interventions qui sont dérivées d'une théorie. D'autres lacunes devront être corrigées dans les futures études, incluant l'utilisation de calculs de la puissance pouvant encourager la collaboration multicentrique afin de garantir que des effectifs adaptés seront recrutés.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales destinées aux patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou

Interventions psychosociales destinées aux patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou

On constate une augmentation régulière du nombre de personnes qui sont diagnostiquées avec un cancer de la tête et du cou. Il est plus courant chez les hommes âgés de plus de 60 ans, mais le taux d'incidence est en augmentation, notamment chez les adultes plus jeunes (hommes et femmes âgés de moins de 40 ans). Les taux de survie pour certains cancers de la région de la tête et du cou sont de plus de 50 %. Par conséquent, la qualité de vie des patients atteints de cancer de la tête et du cou et la manière dont ils s'adaptent à la vie après le traitement sont de plus en plus importantes. Malheureusement, la vie peut considérablement changer pour de nombreuses personnes après le traitement du cancer de la tête et du cou en raison du changement évident de leur apparence, ou des modifications de leur capacité à parler et manger. De même, ce groupe de patients est réputé pour avoir des taux élevés de tabagisme et d'alcoolisme. Cette combinaison entre l'augmentation du nombre des personnes vivant avec et ayant survécu au cancer de la tête et du cou, et le degré élevé de problèmes liés au cancer, a conduit les professionnels de santé à développer des programmes pour apporter un soutien aux patients en ce qui concerne certains des problèmes auxquels ils peuvent être confrontés après le traitement. L'intérêt de ces programmes est souvent centré sur la résolution des problèmes affectifs ou sociaux liés au cancer du patient et s'appellent 'interventions psychosociales'. Cette revue examine les preuves de l'efficacité des interventions psychosociales visant à améliorer la qualité de vie ou le bien-être psychosocial.

Nous avons identifié sept études, totalisant 542 patients adultes ayant eu un cancer de la tête et du cou. Toutefois, un grand nombre des études comportaient des lacunes au niveau de leur schéma et de leur mode de notification des résultats. Ainsi, il a été difficile de tirer des conclusions fiables.

Globalement, cette revue n'a pas découvert d'amélioration de la qualité de vie générale ou des taux d'anxiété et de dépression après une intervention psychosociale.

En conclusion, les preuves de bonne qualité étaient limitées dans ce domaine, c'est pourquoi il a été difficile de tirer des conclusions quant à l'efficacité des interventions psychosociales. D'autres recherches de bonne qualité sont nécessaires dans ce domaine et elles devront cibler les personnes nécessitant une intervention psychosociale, afin d'orienter le développement futur des nouveaux services.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.