Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Mass media interventions for reducing mental health-related stigma

  1. Sarah Clement1,*,
  2. Francesca Lassman1,
  3. Elizabeth Barley2,
  4. Sara Evans-Lacko1,
  5. Paul Williams1,
  6. Sosei Yamaguchi3,
  7. Mike Slade1,
  8. Nicolas Rüsch4,
  9. Graham Thornicroft1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009453.pub2


How to Cite

Clement S, Lassman F, Barley E, Evans-Lacko S, Williams P, Yamaguchi S, Slade M, Rüsch N, Thornicroft G. Mass media interventions for reducing mental health-related stigma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD009453. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009453.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Health Service and Population Research Department, London, UK

  2. 2

    King's College London, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, London, UK

  3. 3

    National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, Tokyo, Japan

  4. 4

    Ulm University, Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm, Germany

*Sarah Clement, Health Service and Population Research Department, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Box PO29, David Goldberg Centre, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. sarah.clement@kcl.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Mental health-related stigma is widespread and has major adverse effects on the lives of people with mental health problems. Its two major components are discrimination (being treated unfairly) and prejudice (stigmatising attitudes). Anti-stigma initiatives often include mass media interventions, and such interventions can be expensive. It is important to know if mass media interventions are effective.

Objectives

To assess the effects of mass media interventions on reducing stigma (discrimination and prejudice) related to mental ill health compared to inactive controls, and to make comparisons of effectiveness based on the nature of the intervention (e.g. number of mass media components), the content of the intervention (e.g. type of primary message), and the type of media (e.g. print, internet).

Search methods

We searched eleven databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2011); MEDLINE (OvidSP),1966 to 15 August 2011; EMBASE (OvidSP),1947 to 15 August 2011; PsycINFO (OvidSP), 1806 to 15 August 2011; CINAHL (EBSCOhost) 1981 to 16 August 2011; ERIC (CSA), 1966 to 16 August 2011; Social Science Citation Index (ISI), 1956 to 16 August 2011; OpenSIGLE (http://www.opengrey.eu/), 1980 to 18 August 2012; Worldcat Dissertations and Theses (OCLC), 1978 to 18 August 2011; metaRegister of Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/mrct/mrct_about.asp), 1973 to 18 August 2011; and Ichushi (OCLC), 1903 to 11 November 2011. We checked references from articles and reviews, and citations from included studies. We also searched conference abstracts and websites, and contacted researchers.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs or interrupted time series studies of mass media interventions compared to inactive controls in members of the general public or any of its constituent groups (excluding studies in which all participants were people with mental health problems), with mental health as a subject of the intervention and discrimination or prejudice outcome measures.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. We contacted study authors for missing information. Information about adverse effects was collected from study reports. Primary outcomes were discrimination and prejudice, and secondary outcomes were knowledge, cost, reach, recall, and awareness of interventions, duration/sustainability of media effects, audience reactions to media content, and unforeseen adverse effects. We calculated standardised mean differences and odds ratios. We conducted a primarily narrative synthesis due to the heterogeneity of included studies. Subgroup analyses were undertaken to examine the effects of the nature, content and type of mass media intervention.

Main results

We included 22 studies involving 4490 participants. All were randomised trials (3 were cluster RCTs), and 19 of the 22 studies had analysable outcome data. Seventeen of the studies had student populations. Most of the studies were at unclear or high risk of bias for all forms of bias except detection bias.

Findings from the five trials with discrimination outcomes (n = 1196) were mixed, with effects showing a reduction, increase or consistent with no evidence of effect. The median standardised mean difference (SMD) for the three trials (n = 394) with continuous outcomes was -0.25, with SMDs ranging from -0.85 (95% confidence interval (CI) -1.39 to -0.31) to -0.17 (95% CI -0.53 to 0.20). Odds ratios (OR) for the two studies (n = 802) with dichotomous discrimination outcomes showed no evidence of effect: results were 1.30 (95% CI 0.53 to 3.19) and 1.19 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.65).

The 19 trials (n = 3176) with prejudice outcomes had median SMDs favouring the intervention, at the three following time periods: -0.38 (immediate), -0.38 (1 week to 2 months) and -0.49 (6 to 9 months). SMDs for prejudice outcomes across all studies ranged from -2.94 (95% CI -3.52 to -2.37) to 2.40 (95% CI 0.62 to 4.18). The median SMDs indicate that mass media interventions may have a small to medium effect in decreasing prejudice, and are equivalent to reducing the level of prejudice from that associated with schizophrenia to that associated with major depression.

The studies were very heterogeneous, statistically, in their populations, interventions and outcomes, and only two meta-analyses within two subgroups were warranted. Data on secondary outcomes were sparse. Cost data were provided on request for three studies (n = 416), were highly variable, and did not address cost-effectiveness. Two studies (n = 455) contained statements about adverse effects and neither reported finding any.

Authors' conclusions

Mass media interventions may reduce prejudice, but there is insufficient evidence to determine their effects on discrimination. Very little is known about costs, adverse effects or other outcomes. Our review found few studies in middle- and low-income countries, or with employers or health professionals as the target group, and none targeted at children or adolescents. The findings are limited by the quality of the evidence, which was low for the primary outcomes for discrimination and prejudice, low for adverse effects and very low for costs. More research is required to establish the effects of mass media interventions on discrimination, to better understand which types of mass media intervention work best, to provide evidence about cost-effectiveness, and to fill evidence gaps about types of mass media not covered in this review. Such research should use robust methods, report data more consistently with reporting guidelines and be less reliant on student populations.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mass media interventions for reducing stigma towards people with mental health problems

People define stigma in various ways. In this review we focus on two key aspects of stigma: discrimination (treating people unfairly because of the group they belong to) and prejudice (negative attitudes and emotions towards certain groups). People with mental health problems often experience stigma. It can have awful effects on their lives. Mass media are media that are intended to communicate with large numbers of people without using face-to-face contact.  Examples include newspapers, billboards, pamphlets, DVDs, television, radio, cinema, and the Internet. Anti-stigma campaigns often include mass media interventions, and can be expensive, so it is important to find out if the use of mass media interventions can reduce stigma.

We reviewed studies comparing people who saw or heard a mass media intervention about mental health problems with people who had not seen or heard any intervention, or who had seen an intervention which contained nothing about mental ill health or stigma. We aimed to find out what effects mass media interventions may have on reducing stigma towards people with mental health problems.

We found 22 studies involving 4490 people.  Five of these studies had data about discrimination and 19 had data about prejudice. We found that mass media interventions may reduce, increase, or have no effect on discrimination. We found that mass media interventions may reduce prejudice. The amount of the reduction can be considered as small to medium, and is similar to reducing the level of prejudice from that associated with schizophrenia to that associated with major depression. The quality of the evidence about discrimination and prejudice was low, so we cannot be very certain about these findings. Only three studies gave any information about financial costs and two about adverse affects, and there were limitations in how they assessed these, so we cannot draw conclusions about these aspects.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public pour réduire la stigmatisation associée à la santé mentale

Contexte

La stigmatisation associée à la santé mentale est très répandue et provoque des effets indésirables majeurs sur la vie des personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale. Ses deux composantes majeures sont la discrimination (traiter différemment certains individus) et le préjudice (attitudes stigmatisantes). Les initiatives anti-stigmatisation comprennent souvent des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public, et de telles interventions peuvent s'avérer onéreuses. Il est donc important de savoir si les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public sont efficaces.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public sur la réduction de la stigmatisation (discrimination et préjudice) associée aux problèmes de santé mentale comparativement à des témoins inactifs, et faire des comparaisons de l'efficacité en fonction de la nature de l'intervention (par exemple, le nombre de composantes des médias grand public), le contenu de l'intervention (par exemple, le type de message premier), et le type de médias (par exemple, support imprimé ou accessible sur Internet).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les onze bases de données suivantes : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2011, numéro 7) ; MEDLINE (OvidSP),de 1966 au 15 août 2011 ; EMBASE (OvidSP), de 1947 au 15 août 2011 ; PsycINFO (OvidSP), de 1806 au 15 août 2011 ; CINAHL (EBSCOhost) de 1981 au 16 août 2011 ; ERIC (CSA), de 1966 au 16 août 2011 ; Social Science Citation Index (ISI), de 1956 au 16 août 2011 ; OpenSIGLE (http://www.opengrey.eu/), de 1980 au 18 août 2012 ; Worldcat Dissertations and Theses (OCLC), de 1978 au 18 août 2011 ; le méta-registre des essais contrôlés (http://www.controlled-trials.com/mrct/mrct_about.asp), de 1973 au 18 août 2011 ; et Ichushi (OCLC), de 1903 au 11 novembre 2011. Nous avons vérifié les listes bibliographiques des articles et des revues, et les références des études incluses. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les actes de conférences et les sites Web, et contacté des chercheurs.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), des ECR en grappes ou des études de séries temporelles interrompues portant sur des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public comparativement à des témoins inactifs chez des membres de la population générale ou certains de ses groupes constitutifs (en excluant les études dans lesquelles tous les participants étaient des personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale), ayant la santé mentale comme sujet de l'intervention et la discrimination ou le préjudice comme mesures de critères de jugement.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de façon indépendante, évalué les risques de biais des études incluses et extrait les données. Nous avons contacté les auteurs d'études pour obtenir des informations manquantes. Les informations sur les effets indésirables ont été recueillies à partir des rapports d'étude. Les principaux critères de jugement étaient la discrimination et le préjudice, et les critères de jugement secondaires étaient la connaissance, le coût, la portée, le souvenir, et le fait d'avoir conscience des interventions, la durée/pérennité des effets des médias, les réactions de l'audience au contenu des médias et les effets indésirables imprévus. Nous avons calculé les différences moyennes standardisées et les rapports de cotes (ou Odds Ratio). Nous avons effectué une synthèse principalement narrative en raison de l'hétérogénéité des études incluses. Des analyses en sous-groupe ont été réalisées afin d'examiner les effets de la nature, du contenu et du type d'intervention s'appuyant sur les médias grand public.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 22 études impliquant 4490 participants. Toutes étaient des essais randomisés (3 étaient des ECR en grappes), et 19 des 22 études comprenaient des données de résultats analysables. Dix-sept des études ont inclus des populations d'étudiants. La plupart des études présentaient un risque de biais incertain ou élevé pour toutes les formes de biais sauf le biais de détection.

Les conclusions des cinq essais fournissant des résultats concernant la discrimination (n = 1 196) étaient mitigées, avec des effets indiquant une réduction, une augmentation ou correspondant à l'absence de preuves de l'effet. La différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) médiane pour les trois essais (n = 394) incluant des résultats continus était de -0,25, les DMS variant de -0,85 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -1,39 à -0,31) à -0,17 (IC à 95 % -0,53 à 0,20). Les rapports de cotes (RC) pour les deux études (n = 802) incluant des résultats dichotomiques concernant la discrimination n'ont révélé aucune preuve d'un effet : les résultats étaient : 1,30 (IC à 95 % 0,53 à 3,19) et 1,19 (IC à 95 % 0,85 à 1,65).

Les 19 essais (n = 3 176) incluant des résultats concernant le préjudice avaient des DMS médianes en faveur de l'intervention, au cours des trois périodes suivantes : -0,38 (immédiatement), -0,38 (1 semaine à 2 mois) et -0,49 (6 à 9 mois). Les DMS pour les résultats concernant le préjudice pour l'ensemble des études variaient de -2,94 (IC à 95 % -3,52 à -2,37) à 2,40 (IC à 95 % 0,62 à 4,18). Les DMS médianes indiquent que les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public peuvent avoir un effet allant de petit à moyen pour réduire le préjudice, et qu'elles sont équivalentes à la réduction du degré de préjudice allant de celui associé à la schizophrénie jusqu'à celui associé à une dépression majeure.

Les études étaient très hétérogènes, sur le plan statistique, en ce qui concerne leurs populations, interventions et résultats, et seules deux méta-analyses dans deux sous-groupes étaient justifiées. Les données relatives aux résultats secondaires étaient éparses. Les données relatives au coût ont été fournies sur demande pour trois études (n = 416) ; elles étaient très variables et n'ont pas concerné le rapport coût-efficacité. Deux études (n = 455) comprenaient des recommandations sur les effets indésirables et aucune de ces deux études n'a rapporté en avoir découvert.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il est possible que les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public réduisent le préjudice, mais les preuves sont insuffisantes pour déterminer leurs effets sur la discrimination. On sait très peu de choses sur les coûts, les effets indésirables ou d'autres résultats. Notre revue a trouvé très peu d'études dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire, ou avec des employeurs ou des professionnels de santé servant de groupe cible, mais n'a trouvé aucune étude ciblant les enfants ou les adolescents. Les conclusions sont limitées par la qualité des preuves, qui était faible pour les résultats principaux concernant la discrimination et le préjudice, faible pour les effets indésirables et très faible pour les coûts. D'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour établir les effets des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public sur la discrimination, pour mieux comprendre quels types d'intervention s'appuyant sur les médias grand public fonctionnent le plus efficacement, pour fournir des données relatives au rapport coût-efficacité, et combler les lacunes concernant les types de médias grand public non abordés dans cette revue. Ces recherches devront utiliser des méthodes robustes, rapporter les données d'une façon plus conforme aux recommandations concernant la notification des résultats et devront moins reposer sur des populations d'étudiants.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public pour réduire la stigmatisation associée à la santé mentale

Interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public pour réduire la stigmatisation subie par les personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale

Les gens définissent la stigmatisation de diverses manières. Dans cette revue, nous nous intéressons exclusivement aux deux aspects principaux de la stigmatisation : la discrimination (traiter différemment certains individus à cause de leur appartenance à un groupe social) et le préjudice (attitudes et sentiments négatifs envers certains groupes). Les personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale sont souvent victimes de stigmatisation. Cela peut avoir des effets terribles sur leur vie. Les médias grand public sont les médias qui visent à communiquer avec de très grands nombres de personnes sans devoir utiliser le contact en face-à-face.  Les exemples comprennent les journaux, les panneaux publicitaires, les brochures, les DVD, la télévision, la radio, le cinéma et le réseau Internet. Les campagnes anti-stigmatisation comprennent souvent des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public, et peuvent être onéreuses, c'est pourquoi il est important d'établir si l'utilisation des interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public peut réduire la stigmatisation.

Nous avons examiné des études comparant des personnes qui ont vu ou entendu parler d'une intervention s'appuyant sur les médias grand public au sujet des problèmes de santé mentale avec des personnes qui n'ont vu ou entendu parler d'aucune intervention, ou qui ont vu une intervention qui n'avait rien prévu au sujet des problèmes de santé mentale ou de la stigmatisation. Notre objectif était de découvrir quels effets les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public peuvent avoir sur la réduction de la stigmatisation subie par les personnes souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale.

Nous avons trouvé 22 études impliquant au total 4 490 participants.  Cinq de ces études comprenaient des données sur la discrimination et 19 comprenaient des données sur le préjudice. Nous avons découvert que les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public peuvent réduire, augmenter ou n'avoir aucun effet sur la discrimination. Nous avons constaté que les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias grand public peuvent réduire le préjudice. L'ampleur de la réduction peut être considérée comme étant faible à moyenne, et est similaire à la réduction du degré de préjudice allant de celui associé à la schizophrénie jusqu'à celui associé à une dépression majeure. La qualité des preuves sur la discrimination et le préjudice était faible, nous ne pouvons donc pas soutenir avec certitude ces résultats. Seules trois études ont fourni quelques informations sur les coûts financiers et deux autres sur les effets indésirables, mais compte tenu des limitations constatées au niveau de la méthode utilisée pour leur évaluation, nous ne pouvons pas tirer de conclusions sur ces aspects.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.