Intervention Protocol

Isotonic versus hypotonic solutions for maintenance intravenous fluid administration in children

  1. Sarah McNab1,*,
  2. Trevor Duke2,
  3. Karen Choong3,
  4. Tavey Dorofaeff4,
  5. Andrew Davidson5,
  6. Mark Coulthard6,
  7. Kristen Neville7,
  8. Robert S. Ware8

Editorial Group: Cochrane Injuries Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009457


How to Cite

McNab S, Duke T, Choong K, Dorofaeff T, Davidson A, Coulthard M, Neville K, Ware RS. Isotonic versus hypotonic solutions for maintenance intravenous fluid administration in children (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009457. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009457.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Children's Hospital, c/o Centre for International Child Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia

  2. 2

    Royal Children's Hospital, Paediatrics, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    McMaster University, Department of Pediatrics and Critical Care Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  4. 4

    Royal Children's Hospital, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Brisbane, Australia

  5. 5

    Royal Children's Hospital, Department of Anaesthetics, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

  6. 6

    Royal Children's Hospital, Intensive Care Unit, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

  7. 7

    Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia

  8. 8

    The University of Queensland, School of Population Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

*Sarah McNab, c/o Centre for International Child Health, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia. Sarah.McNab@rch.org.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

To compare the incidence of hyponatraemia related to isotonic versus hypotonic intravenous fluid administration for maintenance purposes in children and secondarily to assess the change in baseline sodium, rate of hypernatraemia and attributable adverse effects of both fluid types in children.