Intervention Review

Support surfaces for treating pressure ulcers

  1. Elizabeth McInnes1,*,
  2. Jo C Dumville2,
  3. Asmara Jammali-Blasi1,
  4. Sally EM Bell-Syer2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009490


How to Cite

McInnes E, Dumville JC, Jammali-Blasi A, Bell-Syer SEM. Support surfaces for treating pressure ulcers. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009490. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009490.

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Centre for Clinical Outcomes Research (NaCCOR), Nursing and Midwifery, Australia, Nursing Research Institute, St Vincent's and Mater Health Sydney ACU, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia

  2. 2

    University of York, Department of Health Sciences, York, UK

*Elizabeth McInnes, Nursing Research Institute, St Vincent's and Mater Health Sydney ACU, National Centre for Clinical Outcomes Research (NaCCOR), Nursing and Midwifery, Australia, Research Room, Level 5 DeLacy Building, St Vincent's Hospital, Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, 2010, Australia. liz.mcinnes@acu.edu.au. lizmcinnes@bigpond.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pressure ulcers are treated by reducing pressure on the areas of damaged skin. Special support surfaces (including beds, mattresses and cushions) designed to redistribute pressure, are widely used as treatments. The relative effects of different support surfaces are unclear.

Objectives

To assess the effects of pressure-relieving support surfaces in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

Search methods

We searched: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 15 July 2011); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3); Ovid MEDLINE (2007 to July Week 1 2011); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, July 14, 2011); Ovid EMBASE (2007 to 2011 Week 27); EBSCO CINAHL (2007 to 14 July 2011). The reference sections of included studies were also searched.

Selection criteria

We included published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs), that assessed the effects of support surfaces for treating pressure ulcers, in any patient group or setting, that reported an objective measure of wound healing.

Data collection and analysis

Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were performed independently by two review authors. Trials with similar patients, comparisons and outcomes were considered for pooled analysis. Where pooling was inappropriate the results of the trials were reported narratively. Where possible, the risk ratio or mean difference was calculated for the results of individual studies.

Main results

We identified 18 trials of support surfaces for pressure ulcer treatment, involving 1309 participants with samples sizes that ranged from 14 to 160. Of three trials comparing air-fluidized devices with conventional therapy, two reported significant reductions in pressure ulcer size associated with air-fluidized devices. Due to lack of reported variance data we could not replicate the analyses. In relation to three of the trials that reported significant reductions in pressure ulcer size favouring low air loss devices compared with foam alternatives, we found no significant differences. A small trial found that sheepskin placed under the legs significantly reduced redness and similarly a small subgroup analysis favoured a profiling bed compared with a standard bed in terms of the healing of existing grade 1 pressure ulcers. Poor reporting, clinical heterogeneity, lack of variance data and methodological limitations in the eligible trials meant that no pooled comparisons were undertaken.

Authors' conclusions

There is no conclusive evidence about the superiority of any support surface for the treatment of existing pressure ulcers. Methodological issues included variations in outcomes measured, sample sizes and comparison groups. Many studies had small sample sizes and often there was inadequate description of the intervention, standard care and co-interventions. Individual study results were often inadequately reported, with failure to report variance data common, thus hindering the calculation of mean differences. Some studies did not report P values when reporting on differences in outcomes. In addition, the age of some trials (some being 20 years old), means that other technologies may have superseded those investigated.

Further and rigorous studies are required to address these concerns and to improve the evidence base before firm conclusions can be drawn about the most effective support surfaces to treat pressure ulcers.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Support surfaces for treating pressure ulcers

Pressure ulcers (also called pressure sores, decubitus ulcers and bed sores) are ulcers on the skin caused by pressure or rubbing at the weight-bearing, bony points of immobilised people (such as hips, heels and elbows). Different support surfaces (e.g. beds, mattresses, mattress overlays and cushions) aim to relieve pressure, and are used to cushion vulnerable parts of the body and distribute the surface pressure more evenly.

Support surfaces are used alongside other treatments such as wound dressings to treat pressure ulcers and this review has reviewed studies that compared different types of support surface. Low-tech support surfaces included foam filled mattresses, fluid-filled mattresses, bead-filled mattresses, air-filled mattresses and alternative foam mattresses and overlays.  High-tech support surfaces included mattresses and overlays that are electrically powered to alternate the pressure within the surface, beds that are powered to have air mechanically circulated within them and low-air-loss beds that contain warm air moving within pockets inside the bed.  Other support surfaces included sheepskins, cushions and operating table overlays.

We are unable to draw any firm conclusions about the relative effects of support surfaces for treating pressure ulcers because the evidence base is weak. Current trials have failed to provide robust evidence due to small sample sizes, poor reporting of results and poor quality of study conduct and design. Further rigorously conducted research into the use of support surfaces for treating pressure ulcer surfaces is required.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito

Antecedentes

Las úlceras de decúbito son tratadas mediante la reducción de la presión sobre las áreas de la piel lesionada. Las superficies de apoyo especiales (incluidas las camas, colchones y almohadones) diseñadas para redistribuir la presión, son ampliamente utilizadas como tratamiento. Los efectos relativos de las diferentes superficies de apoyo no están claros.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de las superficies de apoyo para aliviar la presión en el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito.

Métodos de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en: Registro Especializado del Grupo Cochrane de Heridas (Cochrane Wounds Group) (búsqueda 15 julio 2011), en el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, número 3); Ovid MEDLINE (2007 hasta julio, semana 1, 2011); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, julio 14, 2011); Ovid EMBASE (2007 hasta 2011, semana 27); EBSCO CINAHL (2007 hasta 14 julio 2011). También se hicieron búsquedas en las secciones de referencias de los estudios incluidos.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron los ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA), publicados o no publicados, que evaluaron los efectos de las superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito, en cualquier grupo de pacientes o contexto, que informaron una medida objetiva de cicatrización de la herida.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

La extracción de datos y la evaluación del riesgo de sesgo fueron realizadas de forma independiente por dos autores de la revisión. Para el análisis agrupado, se consideraron los ensayos con intervenciones, comparaciones y medidas de resultados similares. Cuando el agrupamiento fue inapropiado, los resultados de los ensayos se presentaron de forma narrativa. Cuando fue posible, se calculó el cociente de riesgos o la diferencia de medias para los resultados de los estudios individuales.

Resultados principales

Se identificaron 18 ensayos de superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito, con un total de 1309 participantes y tamaños de muestra de 14 a 160. De los tres ensayos que comparaban dispositivos fluidificados por aire con el tratamiento convencional, dos informaron que los dispositivos fluidificados por aire se asociaron con reducciones significativas en el tamaño de las úlceras de decúbito. Debido a la ausencia de datos sobre la varianza, no se pudieron repetir los análisis. Con relación a tres de los ensayos que informaron reducciones significativas en el tamaño de las úlceras de decúbito que favorecían los dispositivos de baja pérdida de aire, en comparación con las alternativas de espuma, no se encontraron diferencias significativas. Un ensayo pequeño halló que la piel de oveja colocada bajo las piernas redujo significativamente el enrojecimiento. A su vez, un análisis pequeño de subgrupos favoreció una cama articulada, en comparación con una cama estándar, en cuanto a la cicatrización de las úlceras de decúbito existentes de grado 1. La baja calidad de los informes, la heterogeneidad clínica, la falta de datos de la varianza y las limitaciones metodológicas de los ensayos elegibles impidieron la realización de comparaciones agrupadas.

Conclusiones de los autores

No existen pruebas concluyentes acerca de la superioridad de alguna superficie de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito existentes. Las limitaciones metodológicas incluyeron las variaciones en los resultados medidos, los tamaños de las muestras y los grupos de comparación. Muchos estudios tenían tamaños de muestra pequeños y a menudo era inadecuada la descripción de la intervención, la atención habitual y las intervenciones concomitantes. Con frecuencia, los resultados de los estudios individuales se presentaron de manera inadecuada, sin informar los datos de la varianza, lo cual obstaculizó el cálculo de las diferencias de medias. Algunos estudios no informaron los valores de p al notificar las diferencias en los resultados. Además, la antigüedad de algunos ensayos (algunos realizados hace 20 años), hace que otras tecnologías puedan haber reemplazado a las investigadas.

Se requieren estudios adicionales y rigurosos que aborden estas inquietudes y mejoren la base de pruebas antes de que puedan extraerse conclusiones definitivas acerca de las superficies de apoyo más eficaces para tratar las úlceras de decúbito.

 

Resumen en términos sencillos

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito

Superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito

Las úlceras de decúbito (también denominadas escaras por presión, escaras de decúbito y úlceras por presión) son úlceras en la piel causadas por la presión o el roce en los puntos de apoyo óseos de las personas inmovilizadas (como caderas, talones y codos). Las diferentes superficies de apoyo (p.ej., camas, colchones, cubiertas de colchón y almohadones) apuntan a aliviar la presión y se utilizan para amortiguar las partes vulnerables del cuerpo y distribuir la presión de la superficie de forma más pareja.

Las superficies de apoyo se utilizan junto con otros tratamientos como los apósitos para tratar las úlceras de decúbito y esta revisión ha examinado estudios que compararon diferentes tipos de superficies de apoyo. Las superficies de apoyo de tecnología sencilla incluyeron los colchones rellenos de espuma, los colchones rellenos de líquido, los colchones rellenos de cuentas, los colchones rellenos de aire y las cubiertas y colchones de espuma alternativos. Las superficies de apoyo de alta tecnología incluyeron los colchones y cubiertas que se accionan eléctricamente para alternar la presión de la superficie, las camas que se accionan mecánicamente para que circule el aire dentro de ellas y las camas de baja pérdida de aire, que contienen aire caliente que se mueve dentro de bolsas que se encuentran en el interior de la cama. Otras superficies de apoyo fueron las pieles de oveja, los almohadones y las cubiertas de mesa de operaciones.

No fue posible establecer conclusiones definitivas acerca de los efectos relativos de las superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito porque la base de pruebas es débil. Los ensayos actuales no han logrado aportar pruebas consistentes debido a los pequeños tamaños de las muestras, el informe de los resultados deficiente y la calidad deficiente de la realización y el diseño de los estudios. Se requieren más estudios de investigación, realizados de modo riguroso, sobre el uso de superficies de apoyo para el tratamiento de las úlceras de decúbito.

Notas de traducción

Traducido por: Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano
Traducción patrocinada por: No especificada

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Surfaces de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression

Contexte

Les plaies de pression sont traitées en réduisant la pression sur les zones cutanées abîmées. Des surfaces de support spéciales (notamment lits, matelas et coussins) conçues pour répartir la pression, sont couramment utilisées comme traitement. Les effets relatifs des différentes surfaces de support sont indéterminés.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des surfaces de support au niveau du soulagement de la pression pour le traitement de plaies de pression.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et les contusions (recherche du 15 juillet 2011) ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 3); Ovid MEDLINE (2007 à la semaine 1 du mois de juillet 2011) ; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, 14 juillet 2011) ; Ovid EMBASE (2007 à la semaine 27 de l’année 2011) et EBSCO CINAHL (2007 au 14 juillet 2011). Les sections de référence des études incluses ont également fait l’objet de recherches.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) publiés et non publiés qui évaluaient les effets des surfaces de support pour le traitement des plaies de pression, quel que soit le groupe de patients ou l’établissement, et qui reportaient une mesure objective de guérison des plaies.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais de façon indépendante. Les essais composés de patients, de comparaisons et de résultats semblables étaient pris en compte dans le cadre d’une analyse groupée. Dans les cas où le regroupement était inadapté, les résultats des essais étaient notifiés de façon narrative. Le risque relatif ou la différence moyenne était calculé(e) pour les résultats d’études individuelles, le cas échéant.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 18 essais portant sur les surfaces de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression impliquant 1 309 participants et dont les tailles d’échantillon variaient entre 14 et 160. Sur les trois essais comparant des dispositifs à air fluidisé à un traitement standard, deux signalaient une baisse significative de la taille des plaies de pression associées à des dispositifs à air fluidisé. En raison du manque de données de variance signalées, il nous était impossible de reproduire les analyses. Nous n’avons trouvé aucune différence significative dans trois des essais indiquant des baisses significatives signalées de la taille des plaies de pression privilégiant l’utilisation de dispositifs à faible perte d’air au détriment de solutions alternatives en mousse. Un essai réalisé à petite échelle a révélé qu’une peau de mouton placée sous les jambes réduisait de façon significative les rougeurs, de même que l’analyse d’un petit sous-groupe préférait un lit médicalisé à un lit standard pour la guérison des plaies de pression existantes de niveau 1. Des rapports de mauvaise qualité, une hétérogénéité clinique, un manque de données de variance et des limitations méthodologiques dans les essais éligibles indiquaient qu’aucune comparaison groupée n’avait été réalisée.

Conclusions des auteurs

Aucune preuve probante ne permet de démontrer la supériorité d’une surface de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression existantes. Des problèmes méthodologiques concernaient des variations au niveau des résultats mesurés, des tailles des échantillons et des groupes de comparaison. Les tailles d’échantillon de plusieurs études étaient réduites et les descriptions des interventions, des soins standards et des co-interventions étaient inadaptées. Les résultats des études individuelles étaient souvent notifiés de façon incorrecte, sans indiquer des données de variance commune, ce qui empêchait le calcul des différences moyennes. Certaines études n’indiquaient aucune valeur de p lors de la signalisation de différences dans les résultats. Aussi, l’âge de certains essais (20 ans pour certains) signifie que d’autres technologies peuvent avoir supplanté celles ayant fait l’objet de l’étude.

D’autres études plus rigoureuses doivent être effectuées pour répondre à ces problèmes et améliorer les bases de connaissances avant que des conclusions fermes puissent être tirées concernant les surfaces de support les plus efficaces pour le traitement de plaies de pression.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Surfaces de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression

Surfaces de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression

Les plaies de pression (aussi appelées « escarres », « plaies de décubitus » et « plaies de lit ») sont des ulcères cutanés causés par la pression ou le frottement des points d’appui de personnes immobilisées (comme les hanches, les talons et les coudes). Différentes surface de support (par ex. : lits, matelas, surmatelas et coussins) permettent de soulager cette pression et sont utilisées pour amortir des membres vulnérables du corps et répartir la pression en surface de façon plus homogène.

Les surfaces de support sont utilisées avec d’autres traitements, comme les pansements stérilisés, pour traiter les plaies de pression et cette revue a contrôlé des études comparant différents types de surfaces de support. Les surfaces de support rudimentaires incluaient des matelas en mousse, des matelas à eau, des matelas gonflables, ainsi que des matelas et surmatelas alternatifs en mousse. Les surfaces de support plus confortables incluaient des matelas et des surmatelas électriques afin d’alterner la pression exercée au niveau de la surface, des lits bénéficiant d’un dispositif mécanique de circulation d’air et des lits à faible perte d’air contenant de l’air chaud circulant dans des poches situées à l’intérieur du lit. D’autres surfaces de support utilisées sont des peaux de mouton, des coussins et des housses pour table d’opération.

Nous ne pouvons tirer aucune conclusion probante sur les effets relatifs des surfaces de support pour le traitement des plaies de pression car la base de connaissances est incomplète. Les essais actuels n’ont pas réussi à fournir de preuves suffisamment probantes car les tailles des échantillons sont trop petites, les résultats sont insuffisants et la qualité de l’étude, ainsi que sa conception, sont médiocres. Des recherches supplémentaires et plus rigoureuses, portant sur l’utilisation de surfaces de support pour le traitement de plaies de pression, doivent être effectuées.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français