Intervention Review

Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion

  1. Danny Mitry1,*,
  2. Catey Bunce2,
  3. David Charteris1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009510.pub2


How to Cite

Mitry D, Bunce C, Charteris D. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009510. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009510.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

  2. 2

    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Research and Development Department, London, UK

*Danny Mitry, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, City Road, London, EC1V 2PD, UK. mitryd@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is one of the most common occurring retinal vascular abnormalities. The pathogenesis of BRVO is thought to involve both retinal vein compression and damage to the vessel wall, possibly leading to thrombus formation at sites where retinal arterioles cross retinal veins. The most common cause of visual loss in patients with BRVO is macular oedema (MO). Grid or focal laser photocoagulation has been shown to reduce the risk of visual loss and improve visual acuity (VA) in up to two thirds of individuals with MO secondary to BRVO, however, limitations to this treatment exist and newer modalities have suggested equal or improved efficacy. Recently, antiangiogenic therapy with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) has been used successfully to treat MO resulting from a variety of causes. As elevated intraocular levels of VEGF have been demonstrated in patients with retinal vein occlusions there is a strong basis for the hypothesis that anti-VEGF agents may be beneficial in the treatment of vascular leakage and MO.

Objectives

To investigate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal anti-VEGF agents for preserving or improving vision in the treatment of MO secondary to BRVO.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2012, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 7 August 2012 and the clinical trials registers on 10 September 2012.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTS of at least six months duration where anti-VEGF treatment was compared with another treatment, no treatment, or placebo. We excluded trials where combination treatments (anti-VEGF plus other treatments) were used and trials that investigated the dose and duration of treatment without a comparison group (other treatment/no treatment/sham).

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted the data. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants with an improvement from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of greater than or equal to 15 letters (3 lines) on the Early Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) Chart at six months and at 12 months of follow-up. The secondary outcomes we report are the proportion of participants who lost greater than or equal to 15 ETDRS letters (3 lines) and the mean VA change at six months and any additional follow-up intervals as well as the change in central retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography (OCT) from baseline and final reported follow-up, the number and type of complications, the number of additional interventions administered and any adverse outcomes. Where available, the cost benefit and quality of life data reported in the primary studies is presented.

Main results

We found one RCT and one quasi-RCT that met the inclusion criteria after independent and duplicate review of the search results. The studies used different anti-VEGF agents and different study groups which were not directly comparable.

One multi-centre RCT (BRAVO) conducted in the USA randomised 397 individuals and compared monthly intravitreal ranibizumab (0.3 mg and 0.5 mg) injections with sham injection. The study only included individuals with non-ischaemic BRVO. Although repeated injections of ranibizumab appeared to have a favourable effect on the primary outcome, approximately 50% of the ranibizumab 0.3 mg group and 45% of the ranibizumab 0.5 mg group received rescue laser treatment which may have an important effect on the primary outcome. In addition, during the six-month observation period 93.5% of individuals in the sham group received intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg). This cross-over design limits the ability to compare the long-term impact of ranibizumab versus a pure control group.

The second trial was a small study (n = 30) from Italy with limitations in study design that reported a benefit of as-required intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg) over laser photocoagulation in MO secondary to BRVO. We present the evidence from these trials and other interventional case series.

Authors' conclusions

The available RCT evidence suggests that repeated treatment of non-ischaemic MO secondary to BRVO with the anti-VEGF agent ranibizumab may improve clinical and visual outcomes at six and 12 months. However, the frequency of re-treatment has not yet been determined and the impact of prior or combined treatment with laser photocoagulation on the primary outcome is unclear. Results from ongoing studies should assess not only treatment efficacy but also, the number of injections needed for maintenance and long-term safety and the effect of any prior treatment.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion

Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) occurs when a retinal vein that drains part of the retina becomes blocked. BRVO can affect approximately four to five people per 1,000 of the population. Known risk factors for BRVO include hypertension, atherosclerosis, high cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and other inflammatory or autoimmune conditions. In a BRVO the severity of vision loss is related to the extent of macular involvement by haemorrhage, swelling (oedema), and poor blood supply (ischaemia). The most common cause of visual loss in patients with BRVO is macular oedema (MO). Patients with BRVO in one eye are at risk of a venous occlusion in the fellow eye. Untreated, approximately one third of affected eyes will achieve a high level of vision (20/40 or better). Current "gold" standard treatment is laser photocoagulation which has been shown to reduce the risk of visual loss and improve the vision in up to two thirds of individuals with macular oedema secondary to BRVO, however, limitations to this treatment exist and newer modalities have suggested equal or improved efficacy. Recent studies have suggested that an injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) in the eye may be of benefit to patients with BRVO. In this review, we appraise and present the level of current evidence for the use of anti-VEGF injections in the treatment of macular oedema after BRVO. In total, we found one randomised controlled trial and one quasi-randomised controlled trial. One study from the USA. had 397 participants and compared anti-VEGF injections with sham injections. It demonstrated a potential benefit of repeated anti-VEGF injections to improve vision (at least 15 letters) at one year. A second study with 30 participants, conducted in Italy, compared anti-VEGF injections with laser photocoagulation and did not demonstrate an improvement in vision (of at least 15 letters) of anti-VEGF injections over laser photocoagulation at one year. Antiangiogenic treatment was well tolerated in these studies, but since the studies were only of one year duration, we were unable to discuss long-term effects. There are several ongoing studies which undoubtedly will add to the evidence available.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Facteur de croissance endothélial antivasculaire pour le traitement de l'œdème maculaire secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne

Contexte

L'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) est l'une des anomalies vasculaires rétiniennes les plus courantes. On suppose que la pathogenèse de l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) implique à la fois la compression veineuse rétinienne et la lésion de la paroi d'un vaisseau, conduisant peut-être à la formation d'un thrombus au niveau d'un croisement entre les artérioles et les veines de la rétine. La cause la plus fréquente de la perte de la vision chez les patients présentant une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) est l'œdème maculaire (OM). La photocoagulation en grille ou focale au laser s'avère réduire le risque de perte de la vision et améliorer l'acuité visuelle (AV) chez deux tiers des individus présentant un œdème maculaire secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR), toutefois, il existe des limites à ce traitement et des modalités plus récentes semblent indiquer une efficacité égale ou améliorée. Le traitement antiangiogénique avec facteur de croissance endothélial antivasculaire (« anti-VEGF pour Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor ») a récemment été utilisé avec succès pour traiter l'OM ayant pour origine différentes causes. Comme des taux de VEGF intraoculaires élevés ont été mis en évidence chez des patients présentant des occlusions veineuses rétiniennes, cela constitue une base solide pour émettre l'hypothèse selon laquelle les agents anti-VEGF pourraient s'avérer bénéfiques dans le traitement des fuites vasculaires et de l'OM.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et la sécurité d'emploi des agents anti-VEGF intravitréens pour la préservation ou l'amélioration de la vision dans le traitement de l'OM secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (qui contient le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'œil et la vision) (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à août 2012), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à août 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à août 2012, le méta-registre des essais contrôlés (mREC) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'OMS (ICTRP pour International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). Nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction concernant la date ou la langue dans les recherches électroniques d'essais. Nous avons consulté les bases de données électroniques pour la dernière fois le 7 août 2012 et les registres d'essais cliniques le 10 septembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et quasi-randomisés (quasi-ECR) d'une durée d'au moins six mois dans lesquels le traitement par des agents anti-VEGF a été comparé à un autre traitement, l'absence de traitement, ou un placebo. Nous avons exclus les essais dans lesquels des combinaisons de traitements (anti-VEGF plus autres traitements) ont été utilisées et les essais ayant évalué la dose et la durée de traitement sans groupe de comparaison (autre traitement/absence de traitement/placebo).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données de manière indépendante. Le principal critère de jugement était la proportion de participants présentant une amélioration par rapport aux valeurs initiales de la meilleure acuité visuelle corrigée (MAVC) supérieure ou égale à 15 lettres (3 lignes) sur l'échelle de la méthode ETDRS (Early Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy Study) au bout de six mois et au bout de 12 mois de suivi. Les critères de jugement secondaires que nous rapportons sont la proportion de participants ayant perdu au moins 15 lettres sur l'échelle ETDRS (3 lignes) et la variation moyenne de l'AV au bout de six mois et à tous les intervalles de suivi supplémentaires ainsi que la variation de l'épaisseur centrale de la rétine suite à une tomographie par cohérence optique par rapport aux valeurs initiales et lors du suivi final rapporté, le nombre et le type de complications, le nombre d'interventions supplémentaires administrées et toutes les conséquences défavorables. Lorsqu'elles étaient disponibles, les données relatives au rapport coût-bénéfice et à la qualité de vie ayant été rapportées dans les études primaires sont présentées.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons trouvé un ECR et un quasi-ECR répondant aux critères d'inclusion après une revue indépendante et à deux reprises des résultats des recherches. Les études ont utilisé différents agents anti-VEGF et différents groupes d'étude qui n'étaient pas directement comparables.

Un ECR multicentrique (BRAVO) conduit aux États-Unis a randomisé 397 individus et a comparé des injections intravitréennes mensuelles de ranibizumab (0,3 mg et 0,5 mg) à une injection simulée. L'étude a uniquement inclus des individus présentant une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) non-ischémique. Bien que des injections répétées de ranibizumab aient semblé avoir un effet favorable sur le principal critère de jugement, environ 50 % des patients inclus dans le groupe sous ranibizumab 0,3 mg et 45 % des patients inclus dans le groupe sous ranibizumab 0,5 mg ont reçu un traitement de secours au laser susceptible d'avoir eu un effet important sur le principal critère de jugement. En outre, sur une période d'observation de six mois, 93,5 % des individus inclus dans le groupe sous placebo ont reçu le ranibizumab par injection intravitréenne (0,5 mg). Ce plan d'étude croisé limite la possibilité de comparer l'impact à long terme du ranibizumab à un groupe témoin absolu.

Le second essai était une étude de petite taille (n = 30) menée en Italie comportant des limites dans son plan d'étude qui rapportait un bénéfice du bevacizumab intravitréen en cas de besoin (1,25 mg) par rapport à la photocoagulation au laser dans l'OM secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR). Nous présentons les preuves issues de ces essais et d'autres études de séries de cas interventionnelles.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves de l'ECR disponible semblent indiquer que le traitement répété de l'OM secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) non-ischémique par l'agent anti-VEGF ranibizumab est susceptible d'améliorer les résultats cliniques et visuels au bout de 6 mois et 12 mois. Cependant, la fréquence de retraitement n'a pas encore été déterminée et l'impact d'un traitement antérieur ou combiné par la photocoagulation au laser sur le principal critère de jugement reste incertain. Les résultats issus des études en cours devraient évaluer non seulement l'efficacité du traitement mais également le nombre d'injections nécessaires pour l'entretien et la sécurité d'emploi à long terme ainsi que l'effet de tout traitement antérieur.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Facteur de croissance endothélial antivasculaire pour le traitement de l'œdème maculaire secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne

Facteur de croissance endothélial antivasculaire pour le traitement de l'œdème maculaire secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne

L'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) survient lorsqu'une veine de la rétine qui irrigue une partie de la rétine est obstruée. L'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) peut affecter environ quatre à cinq personnes pour 1 000 dans la population. Les facteurs de risque connus pour l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) comprennent l'hypertension artérielle, l'athérosclérose, l'hypercholestérolémie, le diabète sucré, et d'autres pathologies inflammatoires ou auto-immunes. Dans une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR), la gravité de la perte de la vision est liée à l'ampleur de l'implication maculaire par hémorragie, gonflement (œdème), et mauvais apport sanguin (ischémie). La cause la plus fréquente de la perte de la vision chez les patients présentant une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) est l'œdème maculaire (OM). Les patients présentant une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR) dans un œil sont exposés à un risque d'occlusion veineuse dans l'autre œil. En l'absence de traitement, environ un tiers des yeux touchés auront un niveau élevé de vision (20/40 ou meilleur). Actuellement, le traitement de référence pour cette maladie est la photocoagulation au laser qui s'avère réduire le risque de perte de la vision et améliorer la vision chez deux tiers des individus présentant un œdème maculaire secondaire à l'occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR), toutefois, il existe des limites à ce traitement et des modalités plus récentes semblent indiquer une efficacité égale ou améliorée. Des études récentes ont suggéré qu'une injection de facteur de croissance endothélial antivasculaire (anti-VEGF) dans l'œil peut s'avérer bénéfique chez les patients présentant une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR). Dans cette revue, nous estimons et présentons le niveau des preuves actuellement disponibles concernant l'utilisation des injections d'anti-VEGF dans le traitement de l'œdème maculaire après une occlusion de branche veineuse rétinienne (OBVR). Au total, nous avons trouvé un essai contrôlé randomisé et un essai contrôlé quasi-randomisé. Une étude menée aux États-Unis a inclus 397 participants et a comparé des injections d'anti-VEGF à des injections simulées. Elle a démontré un bénéfice potentiel des injections répétées d'anti-VEGF pour améliorer la vision (au moins 15 lettres) au bout d'une année. Une seconde étude totalisant 30 participants, conduite en Italie, a comparé des injections d'anti-VEGF à la photocoagulation au laser et n'a pas démontré d'amélioration de la vision (d'au moins 15 lettres) avec les injections d'anti-VEGF par rapport à la photocoagulation au laser au bout d'une année. Le traitement antiangiogénique a été bien toléré dans ces études, mais étant donné que la durée de ces études était d'une année, nous n'avons pas pu examiner les effets à long terme de ce traitement. Plusieurs études sont en cours à l'heure actuelle et enrichiront nécessairement les preuves actuellement disponibles.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Sant� Fran�ais