Intervention Review

Collaborative care approaches for people with severe mental illness

  1. Siobhan Reilly1,*,
  2. Claire Planner2,
  3. Linda Gask3,
  4. Mark Hann4,
  5. Sarah Knowles5,
  6. Benjamin Druss6,
  7. Helen Lester7,†

Editorial Group: Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Published Online: 4 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009531.pub2


How to Cite

Reilly S, Planner C, Gask L, Hann M, Knowles S, Druss B, Lester H. Collaborative care approaches for people with severe mental illness. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD009531. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009531.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Division of Health Research, Lancaster, UK

  2. 2

    Institute of Population HEalth, Centre for Primary Care, Manchester, UK

  3. 3

    University of Manchester, Health Sciences Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK

  4. 4

    University of Manchester, Biostatistics, Institute for Population Health, Manchester, UK

  5. 5

    Centre for Primary Care, Institue of Population Health, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Manchester, UK

  6. 6

    Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Atlanta, USA

  7. 7

    University of Birmingham, School of Health and Population Sciences, Birmingham, UK

  1. Deceased

*Siobhan Reilly, Division of Health Research, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, C07 Furness Building, Lancaster, LA1 4YG, UK. s.reilly@lancaster.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 4 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Collaborative care for severe mental illness (SMI) is a community-based intervention, which typically consists of a number of components. The intervention aims to improve the physical and/or mental health care of individuals with SMI.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of collaborative care approaches in comparison with standard care for people with SMI who are living in the community. The primary outcome of interest was psychiatric admissions.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Specialised register in April 2011. The register is compiled from systematic searches of major databases, handsearches of relevant journals and conference proceedings. We also contacted 51 experts in the field of SMI and collaborative care.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) described as collaborative care by the trialists comparing any form of collaborative care with 'standard care' for adults (18+ years) living in the community with a diagnosis of SMI, defined as schizophrenia or other types of schizophrenia-like psychosis (e.g. schizophreniform and schizoaffective disorders), bipolar affective disorder or other types of psychosis.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors worked independently to extract and quality assess data. For dichotomous data, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and we calculated mean differences (MD) with 95% CIs for continuous data. Risk of bias was assessed.

Main results

We included one RCT (306 participants; US veterans with bipolar disorder I or II) in this review. We did not find any trials meeting our inclusion criteria that included people with schizophrenia. The trial provided data for one comparison: collaborative care versus standard care. All results are 'low or very low quality evidence'.

Data indicated that collaborative care reduced psychiatric admissions at year two in comparison to standard care (n = 306, 1 RCT, RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.99).

The sensitivity analysis showed that the proportion of participants psychiatrically hospitalised was lower in the intervention group than the standard care group in year three: 28% compared to 38% (n = 330, 1 RCT, RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.99).

In comparison to the standard care group, collaborative care significantly improved the Mental Health Component (MHC) of quality of life at the three-year follow-up, (n = 306, 1 RCT, MD 3.50, 95% CI 1.80 to 5.20). The Physical Health Component (PHC) of the quality of life measure at the three-year follow-up did not differ significantly between groups (n = 306, 1 RCT, MD 0.50, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.91).

Direct intervention (all-treatment) costs of collaborative care at the three-year follow-up did not differ significantly from standard care (n = 306, 1 RCT, MD -$2981.00, 95% CI $16934.93 to $10972.93). The proportion of participants leaving the study early did not differ significantly between groups (n = 306, 1 RCT, RR 1.71, 95% CI 0.77 to 3.79). There is no trial-based information regarding the effect of collaborative care for people with schizophrenia.

No statistically significant differences were found between groups for number of deaths by suicide at three years (n = 330, 1 RCT, RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.32), or the number of participants that died from all other causes at three years (n = 330, 1 RCT, RR 1.54, 95% CI 0.65 to 3.66).

Authors' conclusions

The review did not identify any studies relevant to care of people with schizophrenia and hence there is no evidence available to determine if collaborative care is effective for people suffering from schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorders. There was however one trial at high risk of bias that suggests that collaborative care for US veterans with bipolar disorder may reduce psychiatric admissions at two years and improves quality of life (mental health component) at three years, however, on its own it is not sufficient for us to make any recommendations regarding its effectiveness. More large, well designed, conducted and reported trials are required before any clinical or policy making decisions can be made.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Collaborative care approaches for people with severe mental illness

Collaborative care aims to improve the physical and mental health of people with severe mental illness (SMI). Common to all definitions is that collaborative care aims to develop closer working relationships between primary care (family doctors or GPs and practice nurses) and specialist health care (such as Community Mental Health Teams). There are different ways in which this can be achieved, making collaborative care very complex. Integrating or joining-up primary care and mental health services, so that they work better together, is intended to increase communication and joint working between health professionals (e.g. GPs, psychiatrists, nurses, pharmacists, psychologists). This is meant to provide a person with severe mental illness with better care, based in the community, which is often a less stigmatised setting than hospital, and that promotion of good practice helps consumers maintain contact with services. A major issue is that many GPs still feel that physical health problems (such as diabetes, heart disease, smoking cessation) are more their concern and see treatment of severe mental illness as the job of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Collaborative care aims to improve overall quality of care by ensuring that healthcare professionals work together, trying to meet the physical and mental health needs of people. The aim of the review was to assess the effectiveness of collaborative care in comparison to standard or usual care. An electronic search for trials was carried out in April 2011. The primary focus of interest was admissions to hospital. According to the one included study in this review, collaborative care may be effective in reducing going into hospital (less psychiatric admissions and other admissions). It also helps improve people’s quality of life and mental health. However, all evidence was either low or very low quality and further research is needed to determine whether collaborative care is good for people with SMI in terms of clinical outcomes or helping people feel better as well as its cost effectiveness.

This summary has been written by a consumer Ben Gray (Service User and Service User Expert, Rethink Mental Illness).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Approches axées sur la collaboration en soin de santé chez les patients atteints de troubles mentaux sévères

Contexte

La collaboration en soin de santé pour les troubles mentaux sévères (des troubles mentaux graves) est une intervention communautaire, qui regroupe généralement un certain nombre de composants. L'intervention vise à améliorer les soins de santé physique et/ou mentale chez les individus atteints de troubles mentaux graves .

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des approches axées sur la collaboration en soin de santé en comparaison avec les soins standards chez les patients présentant des troubles mentaux graves et qui vivent dans la communauté. Le critère de jugement principal était le nombre d'admissions psychiatriques.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la schizophrénie en avril 2011. Ce registre est constitué de recherches systématiques dans des bases de données, de recherches manuelles de revues pertinentes et d’actes de conférence. Nous avons également contacté 51 experts au niveau des troubles mentaux graves et des collaborations en soin de santé.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ont décrit les collaborations en soins de santé par les investigateurs comparant toute forme de collaboration en soins de santé avec des soins standard chez des adultes (18 ans et plus) vivant dans la communauté et souffrants de troubles mentaux graves, tels que la schizophrénie ou d'autres types de schizophrénie comme la psychose (par exemple, les troubles schizophréniformes et schizo-affectifs), le trouble affectif bipolaire ou d'autres types de la psychose.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait et évalué la qualité des données. Pour les données dichotomiques, nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95% et nous avons calculé les différences moyennes (DM) avec IC à 95% pour les données continues. Le risque de biais a été évalué.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus un ECR dans cette revue (306 participants; vétérans américains atteints de troubles bipolaires I ou II). Nous n'avons trouvé aucun essai répondant à nos critères d'inclusion, qui incluait les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. L'essai a fourni des données pour une comparaison : les collaborations en soins de santé par rapport aux soins standards. Toutes les preuves sont de faible ou très faible qualité.

Les données indiquaient que les collaborations en soins de santé réduisaient les admissions psychiatriques par rapport aux soins standards, ceci à partir de la deuxième année (n =306, 1 ECR, RR de 0,75, IC à 95% de 0,57 à 0,99).

L'analyse de sensibilité a montré que la proportion de participants hospitalisés pour raisons psychiatriques était inférieure dans le groupe expérimental comparée au groupe de soins standards, ceci dans la troisième année : 28% par rapport à 38% (n =330, 1 ECR, RR de 0,72, IC à 95% de 0,53 à 0,99).

En comparaison avec le groupe de soins standard, les collaborations en soins de santé amélioraient significativement la santé mentale et la qualité de vie au suivi de trois ans (n =306, 1 ECR, DM 3,50, IC à 95% de 1,80 à 5,20). Les mesures concernant la santé mentale et la qualité de vie à trois ans de suivi n'ont pas été significativement différentes entre les groupes (n =306, 1 ECR, DM 0,50, IC à 95% 0,91 à 1,91).

Le coût des interventions directes (tout traitement), fondé sur les collaborations en soins de santé lors du suivi de trois ans, ne différait pas significativement des soins standards (n =306, 1 ECR, DM -$2981,00, IC à 95% de $16934,93 à $10972,93). La proportion de participants abandonnant les études prématurément ne différait pas significativement entre les groupes (n =306, 1 ECR, RR 1,01, IC à 95% de 0,77 à 3,79). Aucun essai ne rapportait d'informations concernant l'effet des collaborations en soins de santé chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie.

Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'était observée entre les groupes pour le nombre de décès par suicide à trois ans (n =330, 1 ECR, RR 0,34, IC à 95% 0,01 à 8,32), ou le nombre de participants qui sont décédés pour toute autres cause à trois ans (n =330, 1 ECR, RR 1,54; IC à 95% 0,65 à 3,66).

Conclusions des auteurs

La revue n'a pas permis d'identifier les études pertinentes pour les soins des patients atteints de schizophrénie. Il n'existe donc aucune preuve permettant de déterminer si les collaborations en soins de santé sont efficaces chez les patients souffrant de schizophrénie ou de troubles schizophréniformes. Cependant, un essai à risque de biais élevé suggérait que les collaborations en soins de santé chez les vétérans américains atteints de troubles bipolaires peuvent réduire le nombre d'admissions psychiatriques à deux ans et améliore la qualité de vie (santé mentale) à trois ans. Néanmoins, ce seul essai n'est pas suffisant pour nous permettre de formuler des recommandations concernant son efficacité. Des essais bien planifiés, réalisés et documentés à plus grande échelle, sont nécessaires avant que des essais cliniques ou des décisions réglementaires puissent être émis.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Approches axées sur la collaboration en soin de santé chez les patients atteints de troubles mentaux sévères

Approches axées sur la collaboration en soin de santé chez les patients atteints de troubles mentaux sévères

La collaboration en soin de santé vise à améliorer la santé mentale et physique des patients atteints de troubles mentaux sévères. Le but d’une collaboration en soin de santé, qui est commun à toutes les définitions, est de développer des relations entre les professionnels en soins primaires (médecins de famille ou généralistes et infirmières praticiennes) et les spécialistes en soins de santé (tels que les équipes communautaires de santé mentale). Cela peut être obtenu de différentes manières, ce qui rend la collaboration en soin de santé très complexe. En intégrant ou en rejoignant les soins primaires aux services de santé mentale viserait à accroître la communication et les groupes de travail entre les professionnels de santé (par exemple, les généralistes, les psychiatres, les infirmiers, les pharmaciens, les psychologues) et à les rendre plus performants. Ceci a pour objectif de fournir des soins plus adéquats aux personnes souffrant de troubles mentaux sévères, basés dans la communauté, qui est souvent un contexte moins stigmatisé que l'hôpital. De plus, la promotion de bonne pratique aide les consommateurs à maintenir le contact avec les services. Le souci le plus important est que de nombreux médecins généralistes considèrent que leurs principales préoccupations sont les problèmes de santé physique (tels que le diabète, une maladie cardiaque, le sevrage tabagique) et que les troubles mentaux sévères doivent être traités par des psychiatres et d'autres professionnels de la santé mentale. La collaboration en soin de santé vise à améliorer la qualité globale des soins en s’assurant que les professionnels de santé travaillent ensemble afin de répondre aux besoins de santé mentale et physique des patients. L'objectif de cette revue était d'évaluer l'efficacité de la collaboration en soin de santé par rapport aux soins standards ou habituels. Une recherche électronique d'essais a été effectuée en avril 2011. Le principal critère de jugement était le nombre d'admissions à l'hôpital. Conformément à la seule étude incluse dans cette revue, les collaborations en soin de santé pourraient être efficaces pour réduire le nombre d’admissions à l'hôpital (baisse des admissions de troubles psychiatriques et autres). Cela permettrait également d’améliorer la qualité de vie et la santé mentale. Cependant, les preuves était de faible ou de très faible qualité et d'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour déterminer si les collaborations en soins de santé sont efficaces chez les patients présentant des troubles mentaux graves en termes de résultats cliniques ou si elles aident les patients à se sentir mieux, ainsi que pour évaluer l’efficacité de son coût.

Ce résumé a été rédigé par un consommateur BenGray (Service User and Service User Expert, Rethink Mental Illness).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�, Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux