Intervention Review

Gases for establishing pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic abdominal surgery

  1. Yao Cheng1,
  2. Jiong Lu1,
  3. Xianze Xiong1,
  4. Sijia Wu1,
  5. Yixin Lin1,
  6. Taixiang Wu2,
  7. Nansheng Cheng1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009569.pub2


How to Cite

Cheng Y, Lu J, Xiong X, Wu S, Lin Y, Wu T, Cheng N. Gases for establishing pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009569. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009569.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Bile Duct Surgery, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

  2. 2

    West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, Chinese Ethics Committee of Registering Clinical Trials, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

*Nansheng Cheng, Bile Duct Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37, Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, China. nanshengcheng@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Laparoscopic surgery is now widely performed to treat various abdominal diseases. Currently, carbon dioxide is the most frequently used gas for insufflation of the abdominal cavity (pneumoperitoneum). Many other gases have been introduced as alternatives to carbon dioxide for establishing pneumoperitoneum.

Objectives

To assess the safety, benefits, and harms of different gases for establishing pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery.

Search methods

We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) until September 2012.

Selection criteria

We only included randomized controlled trials comparing different gases for establishing pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery under general anaesthesia.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors identified the trials for inclusion, collected the data, and assessed the risk of bias independently. We performed the meta-analyses using Review Manager 5. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the mean difference (MD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Main results

Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum versus nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum

Three trials randomized 196 participants (the majority with low anaesthetic risk) to carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (n =96) or nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum (n =100). All of the trials were of high risk of bias. Two trials (n=143) showed lower pain scores in nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum at various time points on the first post-operative day. One trial (n=53) showed no difference in the pain scores between the groups. There were no significant differences in cardiopulmonary complications, surgical morbidity, or cardiopulmonary changes between the groups. There were no serious adverse events related to either carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum.

Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum versus helium pneumoperitoneum

Four trials randomized 144 participants (the majority with low anaesthetic risk) to carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (n =75) or helium pneumoperitoneum (n =69). All of the trials were of high risk of bias. Fewer cardiopulmonary changes were observed with helium pneumoperitoneum than carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum. There were no significant differences in cardiopulmonary complications, surgical morbidity, or pain scores. There were three serious adverse events (subcutaneous emphysema) related to helium pneumoperitoneum.

Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum versus any other gas pneumoperitoneum

There were no randomized controlled trials comparing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum to any other gas pneumoperitoneum.

Authors' conclusions

1. Nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic abdominal surgery appears to decrease post-operative pain in patients with low anaesthetic risk.

2. Helium pneumoperitoneum decreases the cardiopulmonary changes associated with laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, this did not translate into any clinical benefit over carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in patients with low anaesthetic risk.

3. The safety of nitrous oxide and helium pneumoperitoneum has yet to be established. More randomized controlled trials on this topic are needed. Future trials should include more patients with high anaesthetic risk. Furthermore, such trials need to use adequate methods to reduce the risk of bias.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Different gases for insufflation into the abdominal cavity during laparoscopic abdominal surgery

Laparoscopic surgery is now widely performed to treat various abdominal diseases. Traditionally, the first step during laparoscopic surgery is to distend the abdomen, including entry into the abdomen and then insufflation with a gas (pneumoperitoneum), providing sufficient operating space to ensure adequate visualization of the structures and manipulation of instruments. Currently, carbon dioxide is the most frequently used gas for insufflation into the abdomen during laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, carbon dioxide is associated with various changes in physiological parameters that affect the function of the heart or lungs (cardiopulmonary changes). Patients with poor heart or lung function may not tolerate these changes. Furthermore, carbon dioxide, which still stays in the abdomen after laparoscopic surgery, may cause postoperative pain. Thus, other gases, such as nitrous oxide and helium, have been suggested as alternatives to carbon dioxide for establishing pneumoperitoneum.

This systematic review included seven trials with a total of 340 participants (the majority with low anaesthetic risk) comparing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum with nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum (three trials, 196 participants) and carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum with helium pneumoperitoneum (four trials, 144 participants). There were no trials comparing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum to any other gas pneumoperitoneum. All trials had a high risk of bias (suggesting the possibility of overestimating the benefits or underestimating the harms). There were no serious adverse events related to the use of either carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum. Three serious adverse events (gas in the subcutaneous tissue) related to helium pneumoperitoneum were reported. Two of these trials showed that the pain scores were lower with nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum than carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum at various time points on the first post-operative day. There were no differences in the cardiopulmonary (heart and lung) complications, surgical complications, or cardiopulmonary changes between nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum. The cardiopulmonary changes were fewer with helium pneumoperitoneum than carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum. There were no differences in cardiopulmonary complications, surgical complications, or pain scores between helium and carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum.

In conclusion, nitrous oxide pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic abdominal surgery appears to decrease post-operative pain in patients with low anaesthetic risk. Helium pneumoperitoneum decreases cardiopulmonary changes associated with laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, this did not translate into any clinical benefit over carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum. The safety of nitrous oxide and helium pneumoperitoneum has yet to be established.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gaz pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale

Contexte

La chirurgie laparoscopique est aujourd'hui couramment pratiquée pour traiter des maladies abdominales variées. Actuellement, le dioxyde de carbone est le gaz le plus fréquemment utilisé pour l'insufflation dans la cavité abdominale (pneumopéritoine). De nombreux autres gaz ont été introduits à titre d'alternative au dioxyde de carbone pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine.

Objectifs

Évaluer la sécurité d'emploi, les avantages et les inconvénients des différents gaz pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine chez des patients faisant l'objet d'une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, et Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) jusqu'au mois de septembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous n'avons inclus que les essais contrôlés randomisés comparant les différents gaz pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine chez des patients faisant l'objet d'une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale sous anesthésie générale.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont identifié les essais à inclure, extrait les données, et évalué les risques de biais, de manière indépendante. Nous avons effectué les méta-analyses au moyen du logiciel Review Manager 5. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) pour les résultats dichotomiques et la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) pour les résultats continus avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %.

Résultats Principaux

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone versus pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote

Trois essais ont randomisé 196 participants (la majorité à faible risque anesthésique) dans le groupe faisant l'objet d'un pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone (n = 96) ou dans le groupe faisant l'objet d'un pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote (n = 100). Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. Deux essais (n = 143) ont révélé des scores de douleur inférieurs avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote à différents points temporels le premier jour postopératoire. Un essai (n = 53) n'a mis en évidence aucune différence concernant les scores de douleur entre les groupes. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant les complications cardio-pulmonaires, la morbidité chirurgicale, ou les changements cardio-pulmonaires entre les groupes. Aucun événement indésirable grave lié à l'utilisation du pneumopéritoine provoqué soit par le dioxyde de carbone soit par le protoxyde d'azote n'a été rapporté.

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone versus pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium

Quatre essais ont randomisé 144 participants (la majorité à faible risque anesthésique) dans le groupe faisant l'objet d'un pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone (n = 75) ou dans le groupe faisant l'objet d'un pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium (n = 69). Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. Les changements cardio-pulmonaires observés ont été moins nombreux pour le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium que pour le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant les complications cardio-pulmonaires, la morbidité chirurgicale ou les scores de douleur. Trois événements indésirables graves (emphysème sous-cutané) liés au pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium ont été rapportés.

Pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone versus pneumopéritoine provoqué par tout autre gaz

Aucun essai contrôlé randomisé comparant le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par tout autre gaz n'a été identifié.

Conclusions des auteurs

1. Le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale semble diminuer la douleur postopératoire chez les patients à faible risque anesthésique.

2. Le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium réduit les changements cardio-pulmonaires associés à la chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale. Toutefois, ceci ne s'est pas traduit par un bénéfice clinique par rapport au pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone chez les patients à faible risque anesthésique.

3. La sécurité d'emploi du pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote et provoqué par l'hélium n'est pas encore établie. D'autres essais contrôlés randomisés sur le sujet devront être réalisés. Les futurs essais devront inclure davantage de patients à risque anesthésique élevé. En outre, ces essais devront utiliser des méthodes adéquates pour réduire les risques de biais.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gaz pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale

Insufflation de différents gaz dans la cavité abdominale pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale

La chirurgie laparoscopique est aujourd'hui couramment pratiquée pour traiter des maladies abdominales variées. Traditionnellement, la première étape pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique consiste à détendre l'abdomen, notamment l'entrée dans l'abdomen puis à procéder à l'insufflation d'un gaz (pneumopéritoine), afin de créer un espace opératoire suffisant pour permettre la visualisation adéquate des structures et la manipulation des instruments. Actuellement, le dioxyde de carbone est le gaz le plus fréquemment utilisé pour l'insufflation dans l'abdomen pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale. Cependant, le dioxyde de carbone est associé à différents changements des paramètres physiologiques qui affectent le fonctionnement du cœur ou des poumons (changements cardio-pulmonaires). Il est possible que les patients présentant un mauvais fonctionnement du cœur ou des poumons ne tolèrent pas ces changements. En outre, le dioxyde de carbone, qui reste encore dans l'abdomen après la chirurgie laparoscopique, peut provoquer des douleurs postopératoires. Aussi, d'autres gaz, tels que le protoxyde d'azote et l'hélium, ont été proposés à titre d'alternative au dioxyde de carbone pour provoquer un pneumopéritoine.

Cette revue systématique a inclus sept essais totalisant 340 participants (la majorité à faible risque anesthésique) comparant le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote (trois essais, 196 participants) et le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium (quatre essais, 144 participants). Aucun essai comparant le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par tout autre gaz n'a été identifié. Les essais présentaient tous un risque élevé de biais (suggérant la possibilité de surestimation des avantages ou sous-estimation des inconvénients). Aucun événement indésirable grave lié à l'utilisation du pneumopéritoine provoqué soit par le dioxyde de carbone soit par le protoxyde d'azote n'a été rapporté. Trois événements indésirables graves (présence de gaz dans le tissu sous-cutané) liés au pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium ont été rapportés. Deux de ces essais ont montré que les scores de douleur ont été inférieurs avec le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote par rapport au pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone à différents points temporels le premier jour postopératoire. Il n'y avait aucune différence en ce qui concerne les complications cardio-pulmonaires (cœur ou poumon), les complications chirurgicales, ou les changements cardio-pulmonaires entre le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote et provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone. Les changements cardio-pulmonaires ont été moins nombreux pour le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium que pour le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone. Il n'y avait aucune différence en ce qui concerne les complications cardio-pulmonaires, les complications chirurgicales, ou les scores de douleur entre le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium et provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone.

En conclusion, le pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote pendant une chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale semble diminuer la douleur postopératoire chez les patients à faible risque anesthésique. Le pneumopéritoine provoqué par l'hélium réduit les changements cardio-pulmonaires associés à la chirurgie laparoscopique abdominale. Toutefois, ceci ne s'est pas traduit par un bénéfice clinique par rapport au pneumopéritoine provoqué par le dioxyde de carbone. La sécurité d'emploi du pneumopéritoine provoqué par le protoxyde d'azote et provoqué par l'hélium n'est pas encore établie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Sant� Fran�ais