Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children

  1. Tiffany Wong1,2,*,
  2. Antonia S Stang3,
  3. Heather Ganshorn4,
  4. Lisa Hartling5,
  5. Ian K Maconochie6,
  6. Anna M Thomsen2,
  7. David W Johnson7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 30 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009572.pub2


How to Cite

Wong T, Stang AS, Ganshorn H, Hartling L, Maconochie IK, Thomsen AM, Johnson DW. Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD009572. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009572.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of British Columbia, BC Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, Canada

  2. 2

    Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada

  3. 3

    Community Health Services, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB, Canada

  4. 4

    University of Calgary, Libraries and Cultural Resources, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

  5. 5

    University of Alberta, Department of Pediatrics, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

  6. 6

    St Mary's Hospital, Department of Paediatrics A&E, London, UK

  7. 7

    Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

*Tiffany Wong, tiffanywong.mak@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Health professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children that either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them. However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than the use of single agents, and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens.

Objectives

To assess the effects and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them on consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children.

Search methods

In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011).

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials comparing alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever.

Data collection and analysis

One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted separate analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy, combined therapy versus alternating therapy).

Main results

Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included.

Compared to giving a single antipyretic alone, giving combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at one hour after treatment (MD -0.27 °Celsius, 95% CI -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at four hours (MD -0.70 °Celsius, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for at least four hours after treatment (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.42, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence). Only one trial assessed a measure of child discomfort (fever associated symptoms at 24 hours and 48 hours), but did not find a significant difference in this measure between the treatment regimens (one trial, 156 participants, evidence quality not graded).

In practice, caregivers are often advised to initially give a single agent (paracetamol or ibuprofen), and then give a further dose of the alternative if the child's fever fails to resolve or recurs. Giving alternating treatment in this way may result in a lower mean temperature at one hour after the second dose (MD -0.60 °Celsius, 95% CI -0.94 to -0.26, two trials, 78 participants, low quality evidence), and may also result in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for up to three hours after it is given (RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.55, two trials, 109 participants, low quality evidence). One trial assessed child discomfort (mean pain scores at 24, 48 and 72 hours), finding that these mean scores were lower, with alternating therapy, despite fewer doses of antipyretic being given overall (one trial, 480 participants, low quality evidence)

Only one small trial compared alternating therapy with combined therapy. No statistically significant differences were seen in mean temperature, or the number of febrile children at one, four or six hours (one trial, 40 participants, very low quality evidence).

There were no serious adverse events in the trials that were directly attributed to the medications used.

Authors' conclusions

There is some evidence that both alternating and combined antipyretic therapy may be more effective at reducing temperatures than monotherapy alone. However, the evidence for improvements in measures of child discomfort remains inconclusive. There is insufficient evidence to know which of combined or alternating therapy might be more beneficial.Future research needs to measure child discomfort using standardized tools, and assess the safety of combined and alternating antipyretic therapy.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Alternating and combined antipyretics for treatment of fever in children

When they are ill with infections, children often develop a fever. The fever with common viral illnesses, such as colds, coughs, sore throats and gastrointestinal illness, usually lasts a few days, makes children feel unwell, and is distressing for the children, their parents, or other caregivers.

Paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) and ibuprofen lower the child's temperature and relieve their discomfort. This review evaluates whether giving both treatments together, or alternating the two treatments, is more effective than giving paracetamol or ibuprofen alone.

In September 2013, we found six studies, involving 915 children, that evaluated combined or alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen to treat fever in children.

Compared to giving ibuprofen or paracetamol alone, giving both medications together is probably more effective at lowering temperature for the first four hours after treatment (moderate quality evidence). However, only one trial assessed whether combined treatment made children less uncomfortable or distressed and found no difference compared to ibuprofen or paracetamol alone.

In practice, caregivers are often advised to initially give a single agent (paracetamol or ibuprofen), and then give a further dose of the alternative if the child continues to have a fever. Giving alternating treatment in this way may be more effective at lowering temperature for the first three hours after the second dose (low quality evidence), and may also result in less child discomfort (low quality evidence)

Only one small trial compared alternating therapy with combined therapy and found no advantages between the two (very low quality evidence).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement en alternance et en association de paracétamol et d'ibuprofène pour le traitement de l'enfant fébrile

Contexte

Pour traiter la fièvre chez les enfants, les professionels de santé recommandent souvent d’associer ou d’alterner le paracétamol et l’ibuprofène. Cependant, il existe une incertitude quant à savoir si ces traitements sont plus efficaces que l'utilisation d'agents uniques, et quant au profil d'effets indésirables des schémas thérapeutiques en association.

Objectifs

Évaluer l’efficacité et les effets secondaires de l’association de paracétamol et de l'ibuprofène, ou de leur alternance consécutives, par rapport à la monothérapie pour le traitement de la fièvre chez les enfants.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En septembre 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; et l'International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés comparant l'association ou l’alternance de paracétamol et d'ibuprofène à la monothérapie chez les enfants atteints de fièvre.

Recueil et analyse des données

Un auteur de revue et deux assistants ont indépendamment passé au crible les recherches et appliqué les critères d'inclusion. Deux auteurs ont évalué le risque de biais et noté les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons réalisé des analyses séparées pour les différents groupes de comparaison (thérapie en association par rapport à la monothérapie, traitement en alternance par rapport à la monothérapie, l’association par rapport l’alternance).

Résultats Principaux

Six études, impliquant 915 participants, ont été incluses.

Par rapport à l'administration d'un seul antipyrétiques, l’association de paracétamol et d'ibuprofène chez les enfants fébriles peut la température moyenne une heure après le traitement (DM -0,27°Celsius, IC à 95%, entre -0,45 à -0,08, deux essais, 163 participants, preuves de qualité modérée ). Si aucun antipyrétique supplémentaire n’est administré, l’association diminue aussi probablement la température moyenne à quatre heures (DM -0.70° Celsius, IC à 95% -1,05 à -0,35, deux essais, 196 participants, preuves de qualité modérée ), et le nombre d'enfants demeurant ou devenant fébriles pendant au moins quatre heures après le traitement (RR 0,08, IC à 95% 0,02 à 0,42 , Deux essais, 196 participants, preuves de qualité modérée ). Un seul essai a évalué une mesure de la gêne chez l'enfant (symptômes associés à la fièvre au bout de 24 heures et 48 heures), mais il n'a pas trouvé de différence significative pour cette mesure entre les schémas de traitement (un essai, 156 participants, qualité des preuves non classée ).

Dans la pratique, il est souvent conseillé aux soignants de donner d’abord un agent unique (paracétamol ou ibuprofène), puis d’administrer une dose de l'alternative si la fièvre de l'enfant ne disparait pas ou récidive. L'administration d'un traitement de cette manière pourrait entraîner une baisse de la température moyenne une heure après la seconde dose (DM -0,60°Celsius, IC à 95% -0,94 à -0,26, deux essais, 78 participants, preuves de faible qualité ), et pourrait également entraîner une diminution du nombre d'enfants demeurant ou devenant fébriles jusqu' à trois heures après l’administration (RR 0,25, IC à 95% 0,11 à 0,55, deux essais, 109 participants, preuves de faible qualité). Un essai qui évaluait la gêne chez l’enfant (scores de douleur moyens au bout de 24, 48 et 72 heures), a trouvé que ces scores moyens étaient inférieurs avec un traitement en alternance, malgré une diminution du nombre total de doses d'antipyrétiques (un essai, 480 participants, preuves de faible qualité )

Un seul petit essai comparait un traitement en alternance avec la thérapie en association. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'a été observée en termes de température moyenne, ou de nombre d'enfants fébriles à une, quatre ou six heures (un essai, 40 participants, preuves de qualité très médiocre ).

Il n'y avait aucun événement indésirable grave dans les essais qui ont été directement attribués aux médicaments utilisés.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe certaines preuves que l’association ou l’alternance d’antipyrétiques pourrait être plus efficace pour réduire la température que la monothérapie. Cependant, les preuves d'amélioration des mesures de l'inconfort chez l’enfant restent peu concluantes. Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer quelle traitement entre l’alternance et l’association pourrait être le plus bénéfique. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour mesurer la gêne chez l’enfant en utilisant des outils standardisés, et pour évaluer la sécurité de l’association et de l’alternance d’antipyrétiques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement en alternance et en association de paracétamol et d'ibuprofène pour le traitement de l'enfant fébrile

Antipyrétiques en alternance et en association pour le traitement de la fièvre chez les enfants

En cas de maladie infectieuse, les enfants développent souvent une fièvre. La fièvre qui accompagne des maladies virales courantes, telles que les rhumes, la toux, les maux de gorge et les troubles gastro-intestinaux, dure habituellement quelques jours, fait que les enfants se sentent mal, et est angoissante pour les enfants, leurs parents, ou les autres soignants.

Le paracétamol (également connu sous le nom d'acétaminophène) et l'ibuprofène diminuent la température de l'enfant et atténuent leur gêne. Cette revue évalue si l'administration de deux traitements ensemble, ou en alternance, est plus efficace que l'administration de paracétamol ou d'ibuprofène seule.

En septembre 2013, nous avons trouvé six études, portant sur 1 915 enfants, qui évaluaient le paracétamol et l'ibuprofène en association ou en alternance pour traiter la fièvre chez l’enfant.

Par rapport à l'administration de l'ibuprofène ou du paracétamol seul, l'administration de ces deux médicaments ensemble est probablement plus efficace pour diminuer la température durant les quatre premières heures après le traitement ( preuves de qualité modérée ). Cependant, un seul essai a évalué si le traitement en association atténue l’inconfort chez les enfants ou l’angoisse et n'a trouvé aucune différence par rapport à l'ibuprofène ou le paracétamol seul.

Dans la pratique, il est souvent conseillé aux soignants de donner d’abord un agent unique (paracétamol ou ibuprofène), puis d’administrer une dose de l’autre agent si l'enfant continue à avoir une fièvre. Cette administration en alternance pourrait être plus efficace pour diminuer la température durant les trois heures suivant la seconde dose ( preuves de faible qualité ), et pourrait également entraîner moins de gêne chez l'enfant ( preuves de faible qualité )

Un seul petit essai comparait un traitement avec la thérapie en associatione et a trouvé aucun avantage entre les deux ( preuves de qualité très médiocre ).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�