Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Addition of anti-leukotriene agents to inhaled corticosteroids in children with persistent asthma

  1. Bhupendrasinh F Chauhan1,*,
  2. Raja Ben Salah1,
  3. Francine M Ducharme2,3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 2 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009585.pub2


How to Cite

Chauhan BF, Ben Salah R, Ducharme FM. Addition of anti-leukotriene agents to inhaled corticosteroids in children with persistent asthma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD009585. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009585.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Research Centre, CHU Sainte-Justine, Clinical Research Unit on Childhood Asthma, Montreal, Canada

  2. 2

    University of Montreal, Department of Paediatrics, Montreal, Québec, Canada

  3. 3

    CHU Sainte-Justine, Research Centre, Montreal, Canada

*Bhupendrasinh F Chauhan, Clinical Research Unit on Childhood Asthma, Research Centre, CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175, Cote Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Canada. bhupendra_chauhan@rediffmail.com. bhupendrasinh.chauhan@recherche-ste-justine.qc.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 2 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

In the treatment of children with mild persistent asthma, low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended as the preferred monotherapy (referred to as step 2 of therapy). In children with inadequate asthma control on low doses of ICS (step 2), asthma management guidelines recommend adding an anti-leukotriene agent to existing ICS as one of three therapeutic options to intensify therapy (step 3).

Objectives

To compare the efficacy and safety of the combination of anti-leukotriene agents and ICS to the use of the same, an increased, or a tapering dose of ICS in children and adolescents with persistent asthma who remain symptomatic despite the use of maintenance ICS. In addition, we wished to determine the characteristics of people or treatments, if any, that influenced the magnitude of response attributable to the addition of anti-leukotrienes.

Search methods

We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials (CAGR), which were derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL; and the handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts, as well as the www.clinicaltrials.gov website. The search was conducted until January 2013.

Selection criteria

We considered for inclusion randomised controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in children and adolescents, aged one to 18 years, with asthma, who remained symptomatic despite the use of a stable maintenance dose of ICS and in whom anti-leukotrienes were added to the ICS if they were compared to the same, an increased, or a tapering dose of ICS for at least four weeks.

Data collection and analysis

We used standard methods expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.

Main results

Five paediatric (parallel group or cross-over) trials met the inclusion criteria. We considered two (40%) trials to be at a low risk of bias. Four published trials, representing 559 children (aged ≥ six years) and adolescents with mild to moderate asthma, contributed data to the review. No trial enrolled preschoolers. All trials used montelukast as the anti-leukotriene agent administered for between four and 16 weeks. Three trials evaluated the combination of anti-leukotrienes and ICS compared to the same dose of ICS alone (step 3 versus step 2). No statistically significant group difference was observed in the only trial reporting participants with exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids over four weeks (N = 268 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 1.91). There was also no statistically significant difference in percentage change in FEV₁ (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) with mean difference (MD) 1.3 (95% CI -0.09 to 2.69) in this trial, but a significant group difference was observed in the morning (AM) and evening (PM) peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR): N = 218 participants; MD 9.70 L/min (95% CI 1.27 to 18.13) and MD 10.70 (95% CI 2.41 to 18.99), respectively. One trial compared the combination of anti-leukotrienes and ICS to a higher-dose of ICS (step 3 versus step 3). No significant group difference was observed in this trial for participants with exacerbations requiring rescue oral corticosteroids over 16 weeks (N = 182 participants; RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.25), nor was there any significant difference in exacerbations requiring hospitalisation. There was no statistically significant group difference in withdrawals overall or because of any cause with either protocol. No trial explored the impact of adding anti-leukotrienes as a means to taper the dose of ICS.

Authors' conclusions

The addition of anti-leukotrienes to ICS is not associated with a statistically significant reduction in the need for rescue oral corticosteroids or hospital admission compared to the same or an increased dose of ICS in children and adolescents with mild to moderate asthma. Although anti-leukotrienes have been licensed for use in children for over 10 years, the paucity of paediatric trials, the absence of data on preschoolers, and the variability in the reporting of relevant clinical outcomes considerably limit firm conclusions. At present, there is no firm evidence to support the efficacy and safety of anti-leukotrienes as add-on therapy to ICS as a step-3 option in the therapeutic arsenal for children with uncontrolled asthma symptoms on low-dose ICS.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Is adding an anti-leukotriene to an inhaled corticosteroid better than using an inhaled corticosteroid alone in children with persistent asthma?

Background: Asthma management guidelines recommend low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) as preferred therapy for children with mild persistent asthma. In children who have inadequate control of their asthma on low doses of ICS, anti-leukotrienes can be added to ICS. Anti-leukotrienes are a class of anti-inflammatory drugs for asthma. Almost a decade ago, a Cochrane review (Ducharme 2004) evaluating the addition of anti-leukotrienes to ICS in children and adults with asthma identified only two studies of children, one of which was only published as an abstract with insufficient information to contribute data. Considering the publication of several additional studies in the past decade, we wished to update the review with the latest literature.

Review question: To compare the effectiveness and safety of the addition of an anti-leukotriene agent to ICS to the use of the same dose of ICS alone, an increased dose of ICS, or a reduced dose of ICS in children aged one to 18 years with persistent asthma who are not well controlled with ICS alone.

Study characteristics: The evidence was updated until January 2013. We found five studies of children with asthma; of them, four studies, representing 559 children (aged six to 18 years) with mild to moderate asthma, contributed data to the review. No study enrolled pre-school children (i.e. aged under six years). Three studies compared the combination of anti-leukotrienes and ICS with the same dose of ICS alone; one study compared the combination of anti-leukotrienes and ICS to a higher dose of ICS; and no study tested whether the addition of anti-leukotriene to ICS could allow the tapering of the dose of ICS while maintaining asthma control. All studies used montelukast as the anti-leukotriene agent, which was administered for four to 16 weeks. Included studies enrolled both girls and boys and between 65% and 69% were boys. All trials enrolled children with mild to moderate airway obstruction.

Results: Whether comparing the addition of anti-leukotrienes to ICS to the same dose or an increased dose of ICS, there was no difference in the number of participants experiencing one or more moderate exacerbations (that is, requiring oral corticosteroids) or severe exacerbations (i.e. requiring a hospital admission). A single study comparing the same ICS dose reported lung function tests and showed no or small group differences depending on the test used.

Conclusion: There is no firm evidence to support that adding montelukast to ICS is safe and effective to reduce the occurrence of moderate or severe asthma attacks in children taking low-dose ICS and whose symptoms remain uncontrolled. After being on the market for more than 10 years, the limited number of available studies testing antileukotrienes in children, the absence of data on preschoolers, and the inconsistency of available trials in reporting of efficacy and safety clinical outcomes is disappointing and limit the conclusions.

Quality of the results: This review is based on a small number of identified trials conducted in children with asthma; none were conducted in preschoolers. As a single study of moderate duration reported all measures of efficacy and most measures of safety, our confidence in the quality of evidence is low. Other important measures of asthma control were either not measured or reported in different formats, so they could not be pooled. In other words, there are too few paediatric trials to conclude firmly whether either treatment is superior to the other.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'ajout d'agents antileucotriènes aux corticoïdes inhalés chez les enfants souffrant d'asthme persistent

Contexte

Une faible dose de corticoïdes inhalés (CSI) est recommandée en tant que monothérapie préférée pour des enfants atteints d'asthme persistent léger (ce que l'on appelle Etape 2 du traitement). Chez les enfants avec un contrôle insuffisant de l'asthme à faibles doses de CSI (Etape 2), les protocoles de prise en charge de l'asthme recommandent d'ajouter un agent antileucotriène aux CSI existants comme l'une des trois options thérapeutiques pour intensifier la thérapie (Etape 3).

Objectifs

Comparer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la combinaison d'agents antileucotriènes et de CSI à l'utilisation de la même dose, à une augmentation ou une réduction progressive de la dose de CSI chez des enfants et des adolescents souffrant d'asthme persistant demeurant symptomatiques malgré l'utilisation de CSI d'entretien. En plus, nous avons voulu déterminer les caractéristiques des personnes ou des traitements, le cas échéant, qui influençait l'intenstité de la réponse attribuable à l'ajout d'antileucotriènes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons identifié des essais dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires (CAGR), qui ont été estimés à partir de recherches systématiques dans des bases de données bibliographiques incluant le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED et CINAHL; et la recherche manuelle dans des journaux de pneumologie et des résumés de conférences, ainsi que sur www.clinicaltrials.gov. La recherche a été réalisée jusqu' en janvier 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons pris en compte pour inclusion les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) réalisés chez des enfants et adolescents âgés d'un à 18 ans, atteints d'asthme, qui sont restés symptomatiques malgré l'utilisation d'une dose de CSI d'entretien stable et pour lesquels des anti-leucotriènes ont été ajoutés, si c'était comparée à la même dose, à une augmentation ou à une réduction progressive de la dose de CSI pour au moins quatre semaines.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons utilisé les méthodes standards de la collaboration Cochrane.

Résultats Principaux

Cinq essais en groupes parallèles ou croisés (pédiatriques) remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Nous avons considéré deux (40%) des essais avec un faible risque de biais. Quatre essais publiés, représentant 559 enfants (âgés de plus de six ans) et des adolescents atteints d'asthme léger à modéré, ont fourni des données pour la revue. Aucun essai ne recrutait d’enfants d'âge préscolaire. Tous les essais utilisaient le Montélukast comme agent antileucotriène administré entre 4 et 16 semaines. Trois essais évaluaient la combinaison d'antileucotriènes et de CSI comparé à la même dose de CSI seuls (Etape 3 versus Etape 2). Aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes était observée dans le seul essai rapportant des participants atteints de crises nécessitant des corticoïdes oraux pendant quatre semaines (N =268 participants; risque relatif (RR) à 95% 0,80, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95%, de 0,34 à 1,91). Il n'y avait également aucune différence statistiquement significative en termes de pourcentage de variation de VEMS₁ (volume expiratoire maximal en 1 seconde) avec la différence moyenne (DM) de 1,3 (IC à 95%, de -0,09 à 2,69) dans cet essai, mais une différence significative entre les groupes était observée le matin (AM) et le soir (PM) dans les taux de débit expiratoire de pointe (DEP): N =218 participants; DM 9,70 l/mn (IC à 95%, de 1,27 à 18,13) et DM 10,70 (IC à 95%, entre 2,41 et 18,99), respectivement. Un essai comparait la combinaison d'antileucotriènes et les CSI à forte dose de CSI (Etape 3 versus Etape 3). Aucune différence significative entre les groupes était observée dans cet essai pour les participants présentant des exacerbations nécessitant des corticoïdes oraux de secours pendant 16 semaines (N =182 participants; RR 0,82, IC à 95%, de 0,54 à 1,25), il n'y avait pas non plus de différence significative dans les exacerbations nécessitant une hospitalisation. Il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes dans les arrêts prématurés ou en relation à autre cause dans les protocoles. Aucun essai n’explorait l'impact de l'ajout d'antileucotriènes comme un moyen de diminution de la dose de CSI.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'ajout d'antileucotriènes aux CSI n'est pas associé à une réduction statistiquement significative dans le besoin de corticoïdes oraux de secours ou d'hospitalisation comparé à la même dose ou une augmentation de la dose de CSI chez les enfants et adolescents atteints d'asthme léger à modéré. Bien que les antileucotriènes ont été autorisés pour le traitement chez les enfants depuis plus de 10 ans, la rareté des essais pédiatriques, l'absence de données sur les enfants en âge préscolaire, et la variabilité de la notification des résultats cliniques pertinentes limitent considérablement de tirer des conclusions solides. À l'heure actuelle, il n'existe aucune preuve solide permettant de soutenir l'efficacité et l'innocuité des antileucotriènes en tant que traitement en complément des CSI en stade 3 en option de l'arsenel thérapeutique pour les enfants souffrant de symptômes de l'asthme non-contrôlés avec une faible dose de CSI.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'ajout d'agents antileucotriènes aux corticoïdes inhalés chez les enfants souffrant d'asthme persistent

L'ajout d'antileucotriènes à un corticostéroïde inhalé est plus efficace que l'utilisation de corticoïdes inhalés seuls chez les enfants souffrant d'asthme persistent?

Contexte: Les protocoles de prise en charge de l'asthme recommandent une faible dose de corticoïdes inhalés (CSI) comme traitement de choix pour les enfants atteints d'asthme persistent léger. Chez les enfants qui ne contrôlent pas suffisamment leur asthme avec de faibles doses de CSI, les anti-leucotriènes peuvent être ajoutés aux CSI. Les anti-leucotriènes sont une classe de médicaments anti-inflammatoires pour l'asthme. Presque une décennie auparavant, une revue Cochrane (Ducharme 2004) évaluant l'ajout d'antileucotriènes aux CSI chez les enfants et les adultes asthmatiques n'a identifié que deux études portant sur des enfants, l'une de ces études était uniquement publiée sous forme de résumé avec des informations insuffisantes. Étant donné la publication de plusieurs études supplémentaires dans la dernière décennie, nous souhaitions une mise à jour la revue avec la dernière littérature.

Question de cette revue: Comparer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'ajout d'un agent antileucotriène aux CSI à l'utilisation de la même dose de CSI seuls, un dosage supérieur de CSI ou une dose réduite de CSI chez les enfants âgés de un à 18 ans souffrant d'asthme persistant qui ne sont pas bien contrôlés sous CSI seuls.

Caractéristiques de l'étude: Les évidences ont été mises à jour jusqu' en janvier 2013. Nous avons trouvé cinq études portant sur des enfants asthmatiques; quatre études représentant 559 les enfants (âgés de 6 à 18 ans) atteints d'asthme léger à modéré, ont fourni des données pour la revue. Aucune étude ne portait sur des enfants en âge préscolaire et (c'est à dire âgés de moins de six ans). Trois études comparaient l'association d'antileucotriènes et de CSI avec la même dose de CSI seuls; une étude comparait la combinaison d'antileucotriènes et les CSI à une dose supérieure de CSI; et aucune étude n'avait testé si l'ajout d'antileucotriènes aux CSI pouvait permettre la réduction progressive de la dose de CSI tout en maintenant le contrôle de l'asthme. Toutes les études avaient utilisé du Montélukast comme agent antileucotriène, qui était administré pendant quatre à 16 semaines. Les études inclus avaient recruté des filles et garçons mais entre 65 et 69% étaient des garçons. Tous les essais recrutaient des enfants atteints d'une obstruction des voies respiratoires légère à modérée.

Résultats: Si la comparaison de l'ajout d'antileucotriènes aux CSI à la même dose ou un dosage supérieur de CSI, il n'y avait aucune différence dans le nombre de participants avec une ou plusieurs crises modérées (c' est-à-dire, nécessitant des corticoïdes oraux) ou des exacerbations sévères (comme par exemple nécessitant une hôpitalisation). Une seule étude comparant le même dosage de CSI rapportait des tests de fonction pulmonaire et montrait une petite ou aucune différence entre les groupes selon les tests utilisés.

: Conclusion Il n'existe aucune preuve solide permettant de soutenir que l'ajout du Montélukast aux CSI est sûre et efficace pour réduire l'occurrence de crises d'asthme modérées ou sévères chez les enfants sous CSI à faible dose et dont les symptômes demeurent non contrôlés. Étant sur le marché depuis plus de 10 ans, le nombre limité d'études disponibles testant des anti-leucotriènes chez les enfants, l'absence de données avant la scolarité et le manque de cohérence des essais disponibles dans les rapports d'efficacité et d'innocuité des résultats cliniques sont décevants et limitent les conclusions.

Qualité des résultats: Cette revue est basée sur un petit nombre d'essais identifiés menés chez des enfants asthmatiques; aucun n'a été mené avant la scolarité. Comme seule une étude d'une durée modérée rapportait toutes les mesures d'efficacité et la plupart des mesures de sécurité, notre confiance dans les preuves sont de faible qualité. D'autres mesures importantes de contrôle de l'asthme étaient évaluées ou rapportés dans différents formats, donc elles n'ont pas pu être ajoutées. Dans d'autres termes, il existe trop peu d'essais pédiatriques pour permettre d'affirmer si un traitement est supérieur aux autres.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 31st December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�