Intervention Review

Accommodative intraocular lens versus standard monofocal intraocular lens implantation in cataract surgery

  1. Hon Shing Ong1,*,
  2. Jennifer R Evans2,
  3. Bruce DS Allan3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 1 MAY 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009667.pub2


How to Cite

Ong HS, Evans JR, Allan BDS. Accommodative intraocular lens versus standard monofocal intraocular lens implantation in cataract surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009667. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009667.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

  2. 2

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, ICEH, London, UK

  3. 3

    Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, External Disease Service, London, UK

*Hon Shing Ong, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 162 City Road, London, EC1V 2PD, UK. honshing@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 1 MAY 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Following cataract surgery and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, loss of accommodation or postoperative presbyopia occurs and remains a challenge. Standard monofocal IOLs correct only distance vision; patients require spectacles for near vision. Accommodative IOLs have been designed to overcome loss of accommodation after cataract surgery.

Objectives

To define (a) the extent to which accommodative IOLs improve unaided near visual function, in comparison with monofocal IOLs; (b) the extent of compromise to unaided distance visual acuity; c) whether a higher rate of additional complications is associated the use of accommodative IOLs.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE in-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrial.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 10 October 2013.

Selection criteria

We include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared implantation of accommodative IOLs to implantation of monofocal IOLs in cataract surgery.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently screened search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. All included trials used the 1CU accommodative IOL (HumanOptics, Erlangen, Germany) for their intervention group. One trial had an additional arm with the AT-45 Crystalens accommodative IOL (Eyeonics Vision). We performed a separate analysis comparing 1CU and AT-45 IOL.

Main results

We included four RCTs, including 229 participants (256 eyes), conducted in Germany, Italy and the UK. The age range of participants was 21 to 87 years. All studies included people who had bilateral cataracts with no pre-existing ocular pathologies. We judged all studies to be at high risk of performance bias. We graded two studies with high risk of detection bias and one study with high risk of selection bias.

Participants who received the accommodative IOLs achieved better distance-corrected near visual acuity (DCNVA) at six months (mean difference (MD) -3.10 Jaeger units; 95% confidence intervals (CI) -3.36 to -2.83, 2 studies, 106 people, 136 eyes, moderate quality evidence). Better DCNVA was seen in the accommodative lens group at 12 to 18 months in the three trials that reported this time point but considerable heterogeneity of effect was seen, ranging from 1.3 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.68; 20 people, 40 eyes) to 6 (95% CI 4.15 to 7.85; 51 people, 51 eyes) Jaeger units and 0.12 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.19; 40 people, binocular) logMAR improvement (low quality evidence). The relative effect of the lenses on corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA) was less certain. At six months there was a standardised mean difference of -0.04 standard deviations (95% CI -0.37 to 0.30, 2 studies, 106 people, 136 eyes, low quality evidence). At long-term follow-up there was heterogeneity of effect with 18-month data in two studies showing that CDVA was better in the monofocal group (MD 0.12 logMAR; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.16, 2 studies, 70 people,100 eyes) and one study which reported data at 12 months finding similar CDVA in the two groups (-0.02 logMAR units, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.02, 51 people) (low quality evidence).

The relative effect of the lenses on reading speed and spectacle independence was uncertain, The average reading speed was 11.6 words per minute more in the accommodative lens group but the 95% confidence intervals ranged from 12.2 words less to 35.4 words more (1 study, 40 people, low quality evidence). People with accommodative lenses were more likely to be spectacle-independent but the estimate was very uncertain (risk ratio (RR) 8.18; 95% CI 0.47 to 142.62, 1 study, 40 people, very low quality evidence).

More cases of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) were seen in accommodative lenses but the effect of the lenses on PCO was uncertain (Peto odds ratio (OR) 2.12; 95% CI 0.45 to 10.02, 91 people, 2 studies, low quality evidence). People in the accommodative lens group were more likely to require laser capsulotomy (Peto OR 7.96; 95% CI 2.49 to 25.45, 2 studies, 60 people, 80 eyes, low quality evidence). Glare was reported less frequently with accommodative lenses but the relative effect of the lenses on glare was uncertain (RR any glare 0.78; 95% CI 0.32 to 1.90, 1 study, 40 people, and RR moderate/severe glare 0.45; 95% CI 0.04 to 4.60, low quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

There is moderate-quality evidence that study participants who received accommodative IOLs had a small gain in near visual acuity after six months. There is some evidence that distance visual acuity with accommodative lenses may be worse after 12 months but due to low quality of evidence and heterogeneity of effect, the evidence for this is not clear-cut. People receiving accommodative lenses had more PCO which may be associated with poorer distance vision. However, the effect of the lenses on PCO was uncertain.

Further research is required to improve the understanding of how accommodative IOLs may affect near visual function, and whether they provide any durable gains. Additional trials, with longer follow-up, comparing different accommodative IOLs, multifocal IOLs and monofocal IOLs, would help map out their relative efficacy, and associated late complications. Research is needed on control over capsular fibrosis postimplantation.

Risks of bias, heterogeneity of outcome measures and study designs used, and the dominance of one design of accommodative lens in existing trials (the HumanOptics 1CU) mean that these results should be interpreted with caution. They may not be applicable to other accommodative IOL designs.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Accommodative intraocular lenses compared with monofocal intraocular lenses in cataract surgery

Background
Accommodation is the ability of the eye to focus on both distant and near objects.

Accommodation is achieved through the contraction of ciliary muscles, which results in an increase in curvature and a forward shift of the natural lens in the eye. Accommodation declines with increasing age due to a decrease in lens elasticity and a reduction in ciliary muscle contraction, resulting in difficulty in near vision (presbyopia). This is a problem for most people in their 40s or 50s.

For best optical performance, the lens must be transparent. Cataract is the clouding of the human lens. It is more common with increasing age, and is a common cause of visual impairment. Fortunately, cataract is treatable by a surgical procedure in which the natural lens is removed through a small incision. Once all lens material is removed, an artificial lens, known as an intraocular lens (IOL) is implanted into the eye to lie in the original position of the removed natural lens.

All functions of the natural lens are preserved by an IOL, with the exception of accommodation. Standard IOLs, known as monofocal IOLs, allow only distant objects to be focused and seen clearly. Patients require spectacles for near vision. This problem after cataract surgery remains a challenge for ophthalmologists. To overcome the loss of accommodation after cataract surgery, various strategies have been tried with variable success.

Accommodative IOLs have been designed to restore accommodation. The aim of this systematic review is to help define the extent to which accommodative IOLs improve near vision in comparison with standard monofocal IOLs.

Study characteristics
This review looked at four studies that enrolled 229 people (256 eyes) and compared the use of accommodative IOLs to the use of monofocal IOLs in cataract surgery. We last searched for evidence in October 2013.

Key findings
The results of the review showed that participants who received accommodative IOLs had improvements in near vision at six months and at 12 months after surgery compared to those who received monofocal IOLs. However, such improvements were small and reduced with time. Low-quality evidence also showed that more than 12 months after surgery, there was a compromise in distance vision for people with accommodative IOLs. This may be related to the finding that those who received accommodative IOLs also appeared to have a higher rate of posterior capsular opacification (thickening and clouding of the tissue behind the IOL). However, these findings were uncertain. Further research on accommodative IOLs is required before we can draw conclusions on their effectiveness and safety compared to monofocal IOLs

Quality of the evidence
Overall the quality of the evidence was low or very low with the exception for the findings on near vision at six months.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Lentilles intraoculaires accommodatives par rapport à l'implantation de lentilles intraoculaires monofocales standard dans la chirurgie de la cataracte

Contexte

Après une chirurgie de la cataracte et l'implantation de lentilles intraoculaires (LIO), une perte d'accomodation ou une presbytie postopératoire se produit et reste un problème. Les LIO monofocales standard corrigent seulement la vision à distance; les patients ont besoin de lunettes de vue lors de la vision de près. Les LIO accommodatives ont été conçues pour surmonter la perte d'accomodation après la chirurgie de la cataracte.

Objectifs

Définir (a) dans quelle mesure les LIO accommodatives améliorent la fonction visuelle rapprochée non corrigée, en comparaison avec les LIO monofocales; (b) dans quelle mesure l'acuité visuelle à distance non corrigée est-elle compromise; c) si un taux plus élevé de complications supplémentaires est associé à l'utilisation de LIO accommodatives.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (qui contient le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l'ophtalmologie) (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 9), Ovid MEDLINE en cours et autres citations non indexées Update Citations, le quotidien Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (de janvier 1946 à octobre 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à octobre 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (de janvier 1982 à octobre 2013), le registre des essais contrôlés (mECR ) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrial.gov) et le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques (ICTRP) de l'OMS (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). Nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date dans les recherches électroniques d'essais. Nous avons effectué les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques le 10 octobre 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) qui comparaient l'implantation de LIO accommodative par rapport à l'implantation de LIO monofocales dans la chirurgie de la cataracte.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment examiné les résultats de recherche, évalué le risque de biais et extrait les données. Tous les essais inclus ont utilisé les LIO accommodatives 1CU (HumanOptics, Erlangen, en Allemagne) pour leur groupe d'intervention. Un essai présentait un groupe avec les LIO accommodatives AT-45 de Crystalens (Eyeonics Vision). Nous avons effectué une analyse séparée comparant les LIO 1CU aux AT-45.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus quatre ECR, portant sur 229 participants (256 yeux), réalisés en Allemagne, en Italie et au Royaume-Uni. La tranche d'âge des participants était de 21 à 87 ans. Toutes les études incluaient des personnes atteintes de cataracte bilatérale sans pathologie oculaire préexistante. Nous avons jugé que toutes les études présentaient un risque élevé de biais de performance. Nous avons classé deux études à risque élevé de biais de détection et une étude à haut risque de biais de sélection.

Les participants ayant reçu les LIO accommodatives bénéficiaient d'une meilleure correction de l'acuité visuelle à distance et rapprochée (CAVDR) à six mois (différence moyenne (DM) de -3,10 unités Jaeger; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de -3,36 à -2,83, 2 études, 106 patients, 136 yeux, preuves de qualité modérée). Une meilleure CAVDR était observée dans le groupe de LIO accommodatives de 12 à 18 mois dans les trois essais qui avaient rendu compte de ces périodes d'évaluation, mais une hétérogénéité considérable d'effet était observée, allant de 1,3 (IC à 95 % de 0,98 à 1,68; 20 patients, 40 yeux) à 6 (IC à 95 % de 4,15 à 7,85; 51 patients, 51 yeux) unités Jaeger et 0,12 (IC à 95 % de 0,05 à 0,19; 40 patients, vision binoculaire) amélioration logMAR (preuves de faible qualité). L'effet relatif de lentilles sur l'acuité visuelle corrigée à distance (AVCD) était moins certain. Au bout de six mois, il y avait une différence moyenne standardisée de -0,04 d'écart type (IC à 95 % de -0,37 à 0,30, 2 études, 106 patients, 136 yeux, preuves de faible qualité). Lors du suivi à long terme, il y avait une hétérogénéité de l'effet avec des données à 18 mois dans deux études indiquant que l'AVCD était meilleure dans le groupe de monofocale (DM de 0,12 logMAR; IC à 95 % de 0,07 à 0,16, 2 études, 70 patients, 100 yeux) et une étude rapportant des données à 12 mois trouvait des résultats similaires d'AVCD dans les deux groupes (-0,02 unités logMAR, IC à 95 % de -0,06 à 0,02, 51 personnes) (preuves de faible qualité).

L'effet relatif des lentilles sur la vitesse de lecture et l'indépendance aux lunettes de vue était incertain, la moyenne de la vitesse de lecture était de 11,6 mots par minute supérieurs dans le groupe de lentilles accommodatives mais les intervalles de confiance à 95 % des études variaient de 12,2 mots inférieurs à 35,4 mots supérieurs (1 étude, 40 participants, preuves de faible qualité). Les personnes avec des lentilles accommodatives étaient plus susceptibles de ne pas être dépendantes aux lunettes de vue mais l'estimation était très incertaine (risque relatif (RR) de 8,18; IC à 95 % 0,47 à 142,62, 1 étude, 40 participants, preuves de très faible qualité).

Plus de cas de fibrose de capsule postérieure (FCP) ont été observés en termes de lentilles accommodatives, mais l'effet des lentilles sur la FCP était incertain (rapport des cotes de Peto (RC) de 2,12; IC à 95 % de 0,45 à 10,02, 91 patients, 2 études, preuves de faible qualité). Les personnes dans le groupe de lentilles accommodatives étaient plus susceptibles de nécessiter une capsulotomie au laser (RC Peto de 7,96; IC à 95 % de 2,49 à 25,45, 2 études, 60 patients, 80 yeux, preuves de faible qualité). L'éblouissement était rapporté moins fréquemment avec des lentilles accommodatives mais l'effet relatif des lentilles sur l'éblouissement était incertain (RR de tout éblouissement de 0,78; IC à 95 % de 0,32 à 1,90, 1 étude, 40 patients et RR de l'éblouissement modéré / sévère de 0,45; IC à 95 % de 0,04 à 4,60, preuves de faible qualité).

Conclusions des auteurs

Des preuves de qualité modérée indiquent que l'acuité visuelle des participants à l'étude ayant reçu des LIO accommodatives s'améliorait légèrement après six mois. Certaines preuves indiquent que l'acuité visuelle à distance avec des lentilles accommodatives peut s'aggraver après 12 mois, mais en raison des preuves de faible qualité et de l'hétérogénéité de l'effet, l'évidence est incertaine. Les personnes recevant des lentilles accommodatives avaient plus de FCP, ce qui pourrait être associé à une détérioration de la vision à distance. Cependant, l'effet des lentilles sur la FCP était incertain.

D'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour mieux comprendre la manière dont les LIO accommodatives peuvent affecter la fonction visuelle rapprochée et si elles apportent des résultats bénéfiques durables. Des essais supplémentaires avec un suivi plus long, comparant différentes LIO accommodatives, LIO multifocales et LIO monofocales, permettraient d'évaluer leur efficacité relative et les complications tardives. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires sur la maîtrise de la fibrose capsulaire post-implantation.

Les risques de biais, l'hétérogénéité des mesures de résultats et les plans d'étude utilisés, et la domination d'une conception de lentilles accommodatives dans les essais existants (HumanOptics 1 CU) signifient que ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence. Ils pourraient ne pas être applicables à d'autres conceptions de LIO accommodatives.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Lentilles intraoculaires accommodatives par rapport à l'implantation de lentilles intraoculaires monofocales standard dans la chirurgie de la cataracte

Lentilles intraoculaires accommodatives par rapport à l'implantation de lentilles intraoculaires monofocales standard dans la chirurgie de la cataracte

Contexte
L'accomodation est la capacité d'adaptation de l'œil à se concentrer sur les objets éloignés et à proximité.

L'accomodation est obtenue grâce à la contraction du muscle ciliaire, ce qui entraîne une augmentation de la courbure et un devancement du cristallin naturel de l'œil. L'accomodation diminue à mesure que les personnes vieillissent en raison d'une diminution de l'élasticité du cristallin et d'une réduction de la contraction du muscle ciliaire, ce qui entraîne des difficultés à visionner de près (presbyties). Ceci est un problème pour la plupart des personnes qui ont la quarantaine ou la cinquantaine.

Pour une performance optique optimale, le cristallin doit être transparent. La cataracte est l'opacification du cristallin humain. Elle est plus fréquente à mesure que les personnes vieillissent et est une cause courante de déficience visuelle. Heureusement, la cataracte est traitable par une procédure chirurgicale dans laquelle le cristallin naturel est retiré à travers une petite incision. Une fois tout le cristallin retiré, un cristallin artificiel, appelé lentille intraoculaire (LIO), est implanté dans l'œil à la position d'origine du cristallin naturel retiré.

Toutes les fonctions du cristallin naturel sont préservées par la LIO, à l'exception de l'accomodation. Les LIO standard, connues sous le nom de LIO monofocales, permettent uniquement une concentration et une vision claire sur les objets éloignés. Les patients ont besoin de lunettes de vue lors d'une vision de près. Ce problème après la chirurgie de la cataracte reste un défi pour les ophtalmologues. Pour surmonter la perte d'accomodation après la chirurgie de la cataracte, diverses stratégies ont été essayées avec un succès mitigé.

Les LIO accommodatives ont été conçues pour restaurer l'accomodation. L'objectif de cette revue systématique est de déterminer dans quelle mesure les LIO accommodatives améliorent la vision de près en comparaison avec les LIO monofocales standard.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude
Cette revue a examiné quatre études impliquant un total de 229 personnes (256 yeux) et comparait l'utilisation des LIO accommodatives par rapport à l'utilisation des LIO monofocales dans la chirurgie de la cataracte. Nous avons recherché des preuves en octobre 2013.

Les principaux résultats
Les résultats de la revue ont montré que les participants ayant reçu des LIO accommodatives présentaient une amélioration de la vision de près à 6 mois et à 12 mois après la chirurgie par rapport à ceux ayant reçu des LIO monofocales. Cependant, ces améliorations étaient de petite taille et s'atténuaient avec le temps. Des preuves de faible qualité montraient également que plus de 12 mois après l'intervention chirurgicale, la vision à distance était compromise pour les personnes avec des LIO accommodatives. Cela peut être lié au fait que celles ayant reçu des LIO accommodatives semblaient également avoir un taux plus élevé d'opacification capsulaire postérieure (épaississement et opacification du tissu à l'arrière des LIO). Cependant, ces résultats étaient incertains. Des recherches supplémentaires sur les LIO accommodatives sont nécessaires pour pouvoir apporter des conclusions sur leur efficacité et leur innocuité par rapport aux LIO monofocales.

Qualité des preuves
La qualité globale des preuves était faible ou très faible à l'exception des résultats sur la vision de près au bout de six mois.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé