Intervention Review

Homeopathy for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

  1. Emily J Peckham1,*,
  2. E Andrea Nelson2,
  3. Joanne Greenhalgh3,
  4. Katy Cooper4,
  5. E Rachel Roberts5,
  6. Anurag Agrawal6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group

Published Online: 13 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 4 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009710.pub2


How to Cite

Peckham EJ, Nelson EA, Greenhalgh J, Cooper K, Roberts ER, Agrawal A. Homeopathy for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD009710. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009710.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of York, Department of Health Sciences, Heslington, UK

  2. 2

    University of Leeds, School of Healthcare, Leeds, UK

  3. 3

    University of Leeds, School of Sociology and Social Policy, Leeds, UK

  4. 4

    University of Sheffield, School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), Sheffield, UK

  5. 5

    Homeopathy Research Institute, London, Wales, UK

  6. 6

    Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Department of Gastroenterology and Medicine, Doncaster, UK

*Emily J Peckham, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, ARRC Building, Heslington, YO10 5DD, UK. emily.peckham@york.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 13 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, chronic disorder that leads to decreased health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have not been able to give guidance on the effects of homeopathic treatment for IBS because no systematic reviews have been carried out to assess the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment for IBS. Two types of homeopathic treatment were evaluated in this systematic review. In clinical homeopathy a specific remedy is prescribed for a specific condition. This differs from individualised homeopathic treatment, where a homeopathic remedy based on a person's individual symptoms is prescribed after a detailed consultation.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness and safety of homeopathic treatment for treating IBS.

Search methods

We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cochrane IBD/FBD Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Specialised Register and the database of the Homeopathic Library (Hom-inform) from inception to February 2013.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort and case-control studies that compared homeopathic treatment with placebo, other control treatments, or usual care, in adults with IBS were considered for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. The primary outcome was global improvement in IBS. The overall quality of the evidence supporting this outcome was assessed using the GRADE criteria. We calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous outcomes and the risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes.

Main results

Three RCTs (213 participants) were included. No cohort or case-control studies were identified. Two studies published in 1976 and 1979 compared clinical homeopathy (homeopathic remedy) to placebo for constipation-predominant IBS. One study published in 1990 compared individualised homeopathic treatment (consultation plus remedy) to usual care (defined as high doses of dicyclomine hydrochloride, faecal bulking agents and diet sheets asking the patient to take a high fibre diet) for the treatment of IBS in female patients. Due to the low quality of reporting in the included studies the risk of bias in all three studies was unclear on most criteria and high for some criteria. A meta-analysis of two small studies (129 participants with constipation-predominant IBS) found a statistically significant difference in global improvement between the homeopathic remedy asafoetida and placebo at a short-term follow-up of two weeks. Seventy-three per cent of patients in the homeopathy group improved compared to 45% of placebo patients (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.18). There was no statistically significant difference in global improvement between the homeopathic remedies asafoetida plus nux vomica and placebo. Sixty-eight per cent of patients in the homeopathy group improved compared to 52% of placebo patients (1 study, N = 42, RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.80 to 2.15). GRADE analyses rated the overall quality of the evidence for the outcome global improvement as very low due to high or unknown risk of bias, short-term follow-up and sparse data. There was no statistically significant difference found between individualised homeopathic treatment and usual care (1 RCT, N = 20) for the outcome "feeling unwell", where the participant scored how "unwell" they felt before, and after treatment (MD 0.03; 95% CI -3.16 to 3.22). None of the included studies reported on adverse events.

Authors' conclusions

A pooled analysis of two small studies suggests a possible benefit for clinical homeopathy, using the remedy asafoetida, over placebo for people with constipation-predominant IBS. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the low quality of reporting in these trials, high or unknown risk of bias, short-term follow-up, and sparse data. One small study found no statistically difference between individualised homeopathy and usual care (defined as high doses of dicyclomine hydrochloride, faecal bulking agents and diet sheets advising a high fibre diet). No conclusions can be drawn from this study due to the low number of participants and the high risk of bias in this trial. In addition, it is likely that usual care has changed since this trial was conducted. Further high quality, adequately powered RCTs are required to assess the efficacy and safety of clinical and individualised homeopathy compared to placebo or usual care.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Homeopathy for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic disorder characterised by altered bowel habits and abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, constipation or diarrhoea or both. It is difficult to treat because no single cause has been identified. IBS impairs health-related quality of life and work productivity. Currently there is no agreement on the best form of treatment for IBS. Therefore it is important to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of treatments, including homeopathic treatment, which some IBS sufferers use. Clinical homeopathy matches a 'remedy' to a specific condition (such as arnica for bruising), whereas individualised homeopathy involves a series of in-depth consultations to assess symptoms, the effects of remedies and other issues that may affect the patient, in order to select appropriate 'remedies'. Individualised homeopathy includes both a consultation and a remedy, whereas clinical homeopathy consists of a remedy without the in-depth consultation.

This review identified three randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including a total of 213 participants. Two RCTs (129 participants) compared a homeopathic remedy to a placebo remedy for the treatment of constipation-predominant IBS. The other study (23 participants) compared individualised homeopathic treatment (consultation plus remedy) to usual care in female patients diagnosed with IBS. Usual care consisted of high doses of dicyclomine hydrochloride (an antispasmodic drug) and faecal bulking agents (e.g. foods high in fibre). Patients in the usual care group received diet sheets asking them to take a high fibre diet. The three trials tested the effects of homeopathic treatment on the severity of IBS symptoms. None of the included studies reported on side effects. The RCT comparing individualised homeopathic treatment to usual care found no statistically significant difference between homeopathic treatment and usual care. No conclusions can be drawn from this study due to the small number of participants and the low quality of reporting in this trial. In addition, this study was carried out in 1990 and usual care for IBS may have changed since then. Therefore it is not known how individualized homeopathic treatment performs when compared with current usual care. A pooled analysis of two small studies (129 participants) suggests a possible benefit for clinical homeopathy, using the remedy asafoetida, over placebo for people with constipation-predominant IBS at a short-term follow-up of two weeks. However both of the studies were carried out in the 1970s when the reporting of trials was not as comprehensive as it is now. These studies were subject to bias which makes it difficult to determine whether the benefit found in these studies are a true reflection of the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment. Further high quality RCTs enrolling larger numbers of patients are required to assess the effectiveness and safety of clinical and individualised homeopathy compared to placebo or usual care.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Homéopathie pour le traitement du syndrome du côlon irritable

Contexte

Le syndrome du côlon irritable (SCI) est un trouble fréquent, trouble chronique qui conduit à une diminution de la qualité de vie et de la productivité au travail. Les directives thérapeutiques reposant sur des données factuelles n'ont pas été en mesure de suggérer des recommandations sur les effets du traitement homéopathique pour le SCI, car aucune des revues systématiques n’a été réalisée pour évaluer l'efficacité des médicaments homéopathiques pour le traitement du SCI. Deux types de traitement homéopathique ont été évalués dans cette revue systématique. Lors d’homéopathie clinique, un remède spécifique est prescrit pour un trouble spécifique. Ce qui diffère d’un traitement homéopathique individualisé, où un remède homéopathique est prescrit selon les symptômes individuels après une consultation détaillée.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité du traitement homéopathique pour le traitement du SCI.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les MII/TFI, le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'évaluation et la base de données de la Bibliothèque Homéopathique (Hom-inform) depuis leur création jusqu' en février 2013.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), les études de cohorte et les cas-témoins comparant un traitement homéopathique à un placebo, d'autres traitements de contrôle, ou aux soins habituels chez les adultes atteints du SCI, ont été pris en compte pour l'inclusion.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les risques de biais et extrait les données. Le critère de jugement principal était l'amélioration globale du SCI. La qualité globale des preuves indiquent que ce résultat a été évalué selon les critères GRADE. Nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% pour les résultats continus et le risque relatif (RR) et l'IC à 95% pour les résultats dichotomiques.

Résultats Principaux

Trois ECR (213 participants) ont été inclus. Aucune étude de cohorte ou de cas-témoins n’a été identifiée. Deux études publiées en 1976 et 1979 comparaient l’homéopathie clinique (remède homéopathique) à un placebo pour le traitement du SCI avec prédominance de constipation. Une étude publiée en 1990 comparait le traitement homéopathique individualisé (consultation plus remède) aux soins habituels (définis comme des doses élevées de chlorhydrate dicyclomine, des agents gonflants comme traitement fécal et un régime alimentaire riche en fibres) pour le traitement du SCI chez les patients de sexe féminin. En raison de la faible qualité de notification dans les trois études incluses et pour la plupart des critères, le risque de biais était incertain et élevé pour certains critères d'inclusion. Une méta-analyse de deux petites études (129 participants atteints du SCI avec prédominance de constipation) a trouvé une différence statistiquement significative dans l'amélioration globale entre le remède homéopathique asafoetida et un placebo sur un suivi à court terme de deux semaines. 73% des patients dans le groupe homéopathique se sont améliorés par rapport à 45% des patients sous placebo (RR 1,61, IC à 95% de 1,18 à 2,18). Il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative en termes d'amélioration globale entre les remèdes homéopathiques asafoetida plus nux vomica et un placebo. 68% des patients dans le groupe homéopathique ont constaté une amélioration par rapport à 52% des patients sous placebo (1 étude, N =42, RR de 1,31, IC à 95% de 0,80 à 2,15). Les analyses GRADE évaluaient la qualité globale des preuves pour le critère de jugement sur l’amélioration globale comme étant très faible en raison du risque de biais élevé ou incertain, d'un suivi à court terme et de l'éparpillement des données. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n’a été trouvée entre le traitement homéopathique individualisé et les soins habituels (1 ECR, N =20) pour le critère de jugement sur le « malaise », où les participants présentaient un score sur « l’état dans lequel ils se sentaient» avant et après le traitement (DM 0,03; IC à 95% - de 3,16 à 3,22). Aucune des études incluses n'a rendu compte des effets indésirables.

Conclusions des auteurs

Une analyse combinée de deux petites études suggère un potentiel avantage pour l’homéopathie clinique, en utilisant le remède asafoetida, par rapport au placebo pour le traitement du SCI avec prédominance de constipation. Ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence en raison de la faible qualité de notification dans ces essais, d’un risque de biais élevé ou incertain, d'un suivi à court terme et de l'éparpillement des données. Une petite étude n'a trouvé aucune différence en termes de statistiques entre l’homéopathie individualisée et les soins habituels (définis comme des doses élevées de chlorhydrate dicyclomine, des agents gonflants comme traitement fécal, et un régime alimentaire riche en fibres). Aucune conclusion ne peut être apportée dans cette étude en raison du faible nombre de participants et du risque de biais élevé. De plus, il est probable que les soins habituels aient changé depuis la réalisation de cet essai. D’autres ECR de haute qualité, présentant des statistiques adéquates, sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'homéopathie clinique et individualisée par rapport à un placebo ou aux soins habituels.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Homéopathie pour le traitement du syndrome du côlon irritable

Homéopathie pour le traitement du syndrome du côlon irritable

Le syndrome du côlon irritable (SCI) est un trouble chronique courant qui se caractérise par une altération des habitudes intestinales et des douleurs abdominales, une gêne, des ballonnements, de la constipation ou des diarrhées ou les deux. Il est difficile à traiter, car aucune cause unique n’a été identifiée. Le SCI dégrade la qualité de vie liée à la santé et la productivité au travail. À ce jour, il n'existe pas de consensus concernant le traitement du SCI le plus adéquat. Par conséquent, il est important d'évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité des traitements, y compris le traitement homéopathique dont certaines personnes atteintes du SCI utilisent. L’homéopathie clinique correspond à un remède pour traiter un trouble spécifique (tel que l’arnica pour traiter les ecchymoses), tandis que l’homéopathie individualisée implique une série de consultations approfondies pour évaluer les symptômes, les effets des remèdes et d'autres problèmes qui peuvent affecter le patient, afin de sélectionner le « remède » approprié. L’homéopathie individualisée inclut à la fois une consultation et un remède, alors que l’homéopathie clinique consiste en une investigation sans la consultation approfondie.

Cette revue a identifié trois essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) portant sur un total de 213 participants. Deux ECR (129 participants) comparaient un remède homéopathique à un placebo pour le traitement du SCI avec prédominance de constipation. L'autre étude (23 participants) comparait le traitement homéopathique individualisé (consultation plus remède) aux soins habituels chez les patients présentant un diagnostic du SCI. Les soins habituels comprenaient des doses élevées de chlorhydrate de dicyclomine (un médicament antispasmodique) et des agents gonflants comme traitement fécale(tels que les aliments riche en fibres). Les patients du groupe de soins habituels suivaient un régime alimentaire en fibres élevé. Les trois essais étudiaient les effets du traitement homéopathique sur la gravité des symptômes du SCI. Aucune des études incluses n'a rendu compte des effets secondaires. Les ECR comparant les traitements homéopathiques individualisés aux soins habituels n’ont trouvé aucune différence statistiquement significative entre le traitement homéopathique et les soins habituels. Aucune conclusion ne peut être apportée dans cette étude en raison du petit nombre de participants et de la faible qualité de notification. De plus, cette étude a été effectuée en 1990 et les soins habituels pour le SCI ont depuis peut-être été modifiés. Par conséquent, on ne connait pas la performance du traitement homéopathique individualisé en comparaison avec les soins habituels. Une analyse combinée de deux petites études (129 participants) suggère un avantage potentiel pour l’homéopathie clinique, en utilisant l’asafoetida, par rapport au placebo pour les patients atteints du SCI avec prédominance de constipation sur un suivi à court terme de deux semaines. Cependant, les deux études ont été effectuées dans les années 1970, lorsque le compte-rendu des essais n'était pas aussi exhaustif qu’aujourd'hui. Ces études étaient sujettes à un biais, ce qui rend difficile de déterminer si les avantages trouvés dans ces études reflètent véritablement l'efficacité du traitement homéopathique. D’autres ECR de haute qualité portant sur un plus grand nombre de patients sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'efficacité et l’innocuité de l’homéopathie clinique et individualisée par rapport à un placebo ou aux soins habituels.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�, Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux