Intervention Review

Devices for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel

  1. Marie-Claude Lavoie1,*,
  2. Jos H Verbeek2,
  3. Manisha Pahwa3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Group

Published Online: 9 MAR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 27 JAN 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009740.pub2


How to Cite

Lavoie MC, Verbeek JH, Pahwa M. Devices for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009740. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009740.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  2. 2

    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group, Kuopio, Finland

  3. 3

    University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

*Marie-Claude Lavoie, University of Maryland Baltimore, 110 South Paca Street, Rm 4-S-100, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201, USA. mclavoie@umaryland.edu. marieclavoie@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 9 MAR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Needlestick injuries from devices used for blood collection or for injections expose healthcare workers to the risk of blood borne infections such as hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Safety features such as shields or retractable needles can possibly contribute to the prevention of these injuries and it is important to evaluate their effectiveness.

Objectives

To determine the benefits and harms of safety medical devices aiming to prevent percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel versus no intervention or alternative interventions.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, NHSEED, Science Citation Index Expanded, CINAHL, Nioshtic, CISdoc and PsycINFO (until January 2014) and LILACS (until January 2012).

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before and after studies (CBA) and interrupted time-series (ITS) designs on the effect of safety engineered medical devices on needlestick injuries in healthcare staff.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias and extracted data. We synthesized study results with a fixed-effect or random-effects model meta-analysis where appropriate.

Main results

We included four RCTs with 1136 participants, two cluster-RCTs with 795 participants and 73,454 patient days, four CBAs with approximately 22,000 participants and seven ITS with an average of seven data points. These studies evaluated safe modifications of blood collection systems, intravenous (IV) systems, injection systems, multiple devices and sharps containers. The needlestick injury (NSI) rate in the control groups was estimated at about one to five NSIs per 1000 person-years. There was only one study from a low- or middle-income country. The risk of bias was high in most studies.

In one ITS study that evaluated safe blood collection systems, NSIs decreased immediately after the introduction (effect size (ES) -6.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) -9.5 to -4.2) and there was no clear evidence of an additional benefit over time (ES -1.2, 95% CI -2.5 to 0.1). Another ITS study used an outdated recapping shield.

There was very low quality evidence that NSIs were reduced with the introduction of safe IV devices in two out of four studies but the other two studies showed no clear evidence of a trend towards a reduction. However, there was moderate quality evidence in four other studies that these devices increased the number of blood splashes where the safety system had to be engaged actively (relative risk (RR) 1.6, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.36).

There was no clear evidence that the introduction of safe injection devices changed the NSI rate in two studies.

The introduction of multiple safety devices showed a decrease in NSI in one study but not in another. The introduction of safety containers showed a decrease in NSI in one study but inconsistent results in two other studies.

There was no evidence in the included studies about which type of device was better, for example shielding or retraction of the needle.

Authors' conclusions

For safe blood collection systems, we found very low quality evidence in one study that these decrease needlestick injuries (NSIs). For intravenous systems, we found very low quality evidence that they result in a decrease of NSI compared with usual devices but moderate quality evidence that they increase contamination with blood. For other safe injection needles, the introduction of multiple safety devices or the introduction of sharps containers the evidence was inconsistent or there was no clear evidence of a benefit. All studies had a considerable risk of bias and the lack of evidence of a beneficial effect could be due both to confounding and bias. This does not mean that these devices are not effective.

Cluster-randomised controlled studies are needed to compare the various types of safety engineered devices for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Devices with safety features for preventing needle stick injuries in healthcare staff

Background

Needlestick injuries (NSIs) from devices used for blood collection or for injections expose healthcare workers to the risk of serious infections such as hepatitis or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Safety features such as shields or retractable needles can help prevent these injuries. We wanted to find out how effective these devices are. We searched for studies in multiple databases until January 2012 for randomised (RCTs) and non-randomised studies (NRS).

Studies included in this review

We included eight RCTs and 11 NRS. These studies evaluated the safety of blood collection systems, intravenous (IV) systems, injection systems, multiple devices and sharps containers. We estimated that the NSI rate in the control groups was one to five NSIs per 1000 person-years. The risk of bias was high in most studies.

What does the research say?

In one NRS study that evaluated safe blood collection systems, NSIs decreased right after the systems were put into use but there was no further decrease over time.

There was very low quality evidence that NSIs reduced significantly using safe IV devices. However, there was moderate quality evidence in four other studies that these devices increased the number of blood splashes where the user had to switch on the safety system.

There was no clear evidence that safe injection devices reduced the NSI rate in two studies.

Using many safety devices showed a decrease in NSI in one study but not in another. Using safety containers showed a decrease in NSI in one study but inconsistent results in two studies.

There was no evidence in the included studies about which type of device was better. So, for example, we do not know if it is safer to shield or retract a needle.

What is the bottom line?

We concluded that there is only very low quality, inconsistent evidence that most safety devices prevent needlestick injuries (NSIs). The risk of blood contamination is greater with devices that have to be actively switched on. The lack of a clear beneficial effect could be due to the high risk of bias in the studies. This does not mean that these devices are not effective.

Cluster-randomised studies are needed to compare the various types of safety devices for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les dispositifs pour la prévention des blessures liées à l'exposition percutanée et causées par les aiguilles chez le personnel médical

Contexte

Les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille de dispositifs utilisés pour le prélèvement sanguin ou pour les injections exposent le personnel médical au risque de contamination par voie sanguine, telle que l'hépatite B et C, ainsi que le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH). Les dispositifs de protection, tels que les manchons de protection pour aiguille ou les aiguilles rétractables, pourraient permettre de prévenir ces blessures et il est important d'évaluer leur efficacité.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets bénéfiques et délétères des dispositifs médicaux protecteurs visant à prévenir des blessures liées à l'exposition percutanée causée par les aiguilles chez le personnel médical par rapport à l'absence d'intervention ou à d'autres interventions.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, NHSEED, Science Citation Index Expanded, CINAHL, Nioshtic, CISdoc et PsycINFO (jusqu'en janvier 2014) et LILACS (jusqu'en janvier 2012).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), les études contrôlées avant et après (CAA) et les séries chronologiques interrompues (SCI) évaluant l'effet des dispositifs médicaux protecteurs contre les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille chez le personnel médical.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité et le risque de biais et extrait les données. Nous avons synthétisé les résultats des études avec une méta-analyse de modèle à effets fixes ou à effets aléatoires lorsque cela était approprié.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus quatre ECR totalisant 1 136 participants, deux ECR en grappes portant sur 795 participants et 73 454 jours-patients, quatre études CAA présentaient environ 22 000 participants et 7 SCI avec une moyenne de sept points de données. Ces études ont évalué les modifications sécuritaires des systèmes de collecte de sang, des systèmes par voie intraveineuse (VI), des systèmes d'injection, des multiples dispositifs et des contenants pour objets tranchants. Le taux de blessures par piqûre d'aiguille (BPA) dans les groupes témoins était estimé d'une à cinq BPA pour 1000 personnes par année. Il y avait une seule étude d'un pays à revenu faible ou moyen. Le risque de biais était élevé dans la plupart des études.

Dans une étude SCI qui évaluait les systèmes sûrs de prélèvement sanguin, les BPA réduisaient immédiatement après l'introduction de ces systèmes (ampleur de l'effet (AE) -6,9, intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) de -9,5 à -4,2) et il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'un bénéfice supplémentaire au fil du temps (AE -1,2, IC à 95 % -2,5 à 0,1). Une autre étude SCI utilisait un capuchon de protection obsolète.

Dans deux études sur quatre, des preuves de très faible qualité indiquaient que les BPA diminuaient suite à l'introduction de dispositifs intraveineux sûrs, mais les deux autres études ne montraient aucune preuve probante d'une tendance à la baisse. Cependant, des preuves de qualité modérée dans quatre autres études indiquaient que ces dispositifs augmentaient le nombre d'éclaboussure de sang lorsque le système de protection devait être allumé en continu (risque relatif (RR) 1,6, IC à 95 % 1,08 à 2,36).

Dans deux études, il n'y avait aucune preuve probante que l'introduction de dispositifs d'injection sûrs modifiait les taux de BPA.

L'introduction de multiples dispositifs de protection montrait une diminution des BPA dans seulement une étude. L'introduction de contenants protecteurs montrait une diminution de BPA dans une étude, mais deux études indiquaient des résultats incohérents.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve dans les études incluses sur le type de dispositif le plus efficace, par exemple les manchons de protection pour aiguille ou les aiguilles rétractables.

Conclusions des auteurs

Dans une étude, des preuves de très faible qualité indiquaient que les systèmes sûrs de collectes du sang réduisaient les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille (BPA). Des preuves de très faible qualité indiquaient que les systèmes par voie intraveineuse entraînaient une diminution de BPA par rapport aux dispositifs ordinaires, mais des preuves de qualité modérée indiquaient qu'ils augmentaient la contamination avec le sang. Les preuves étaient incohérentes ou il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'un bénéfice concernant les autres aiguilles d'injection sûres, l'introduction de multiples dispositifs de protection ou l'introduction de contenants pour objets tranchants. Toutes les études présentaient un risque considérable de biais et le manque de preuves d'un effet bénéfique pourrait être dû à la fois à des confusions et à des biais. Cela ne signifie pas que ces dispositifs ne sont pas efficaces.

Des études randomisées par grappes sont nécessaires pour comparer les différents types de dispositifs de protection selon leur efficacité et leur rapport coût-efficacité, en particulier dans les pays à faibles et moyens revenus.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les dispositifs pour la prévention des blessures liées à l'exposition percutanée et causées par les aiguilles chez le personnel médical

Les dispositifs de protection pour prévenir les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille chez le personnel médical

Contexte

Les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille (BPA), provenant de dispositifs utilisés pour le prélèvement sanguin ou pour les injections, exposent le personnel médical à des risques d'infections graves, telles que l'hépatite ou le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH). Les dispositifs de protection, tels que les manchons de protection pour aiguille ou les aiguilles rétractables, peuvent permettre de prévenir ces blessures. Nous avons voulu déterminer l'efficacité de ces dispositifs. Nous avons recherché des études d'essais randomisés (ECR) et non randomisés (ENR) dans plusieurs bases de données jusqu'en janvier 2012.

Études incluses dans cette revue

Nous avons inclus 8 ECR et 11 ENR. Ces études évaluaient la sécurité des systèmes de collecte de sang, des systèmes par voie intraveineuse (VI), des systèmes d'injection, des dispositifs multiples et des contenants pour objets tranchants. Nous avons estimé que le taux de BPA dans les groupes témoins était de une à cinq BPA pour 1000 personnes par année. Le risque de biais était élevé dans la plupart des études.

Que dit la recherche?

Dans une étude d'ENR qui évaluait les systèmes sûrs de collecte du sang, les BPA ont diminuées immédiatement après l'introduction de ces systèmes, mais il n'y avait aucune baisse supplémentaire au fil du temps.

Des preuves de très faible qualité indiquaient que les BPA réduisaient significativement en utilisant les dispositifs intraveineux sûrs. Cependant, des preuves de qualité modérée dans quatre autres études indiquaient que ces dispositifs augmentaient le nombre d'éclaboussures de sang lorsque l'utilisateur devait mettre le système de protection en marche.

Dans deux études, aucune preuve probante n'indiquait que les dispositifs sûrs d'injection réduisaient le taux de BPA.

L'utilisation de plusieurs dispositifs de protection montrait une diminution des BPA dans une étude, mais pas dans l'autre. L'utilisation de contenants protecteurs montrait une diminution de BPA dans une étude, mais deux études indiquaient des résultats incohérents.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve dans les études incluses sur le type de dispositif le plus efficace. Nous ne savons donc pas si, par exemple, les manchons de protection pour aiguille sont plus sûrs que les aiguilles rétractables.

Quelles conclusions peut-on en tirer ?

Nous avons conclu qu'il existe uniquement des preuves de très faible qualité et contradictoires indiquant que la plupart des dispositifs de protection préviennent les blessures par piqûre d'aiguille (BPA). Le risque de contamination du sang est plus important avec des appareils qui doivent être allumés en continu. Le manque d'effet bénéfique probant pourrait être dû au risque de biais élevé dans les études. Cela ne signifie pas que ces dispositifs ne sont pas efficaces.

Des études randomisées par grappes sont nécessaires pour comparer les différents types de dispositifs de protection selon leur efficacité et leur rapport coût-efficacité, en particulier dans les pays à faibles et moyens revenus.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé