Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Selective computed tomography (CT) versus routine thoracoabdominal CT for high-energy blunt-trauma patients

  1. Raoul Van Vugt1,*,
  2. Frederik Keus2,
  3. Digna Kool3,
  4. Jaap Deunk4,
  5. Michael Edwards1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Injuries Group

Published Online: 23 DEC 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 9 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009743.pub2


How to Cite

Van Vugt R, Keus F, Kool D, Deunk J, Edwards M. Selective computed tomography (CT) versus routine thoracoabdominal CT for high-energy blunt-trauma patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009743. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009743.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Surgery and Trauma, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  2. 2

    University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Critical Care, Groningen, Netherlands

  3. 3

    Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  4. 4

    VU Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam, Brabant, Netherlands

*Raoul Van Vugt, Department of Surgery and Trauma, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen, 6500 HB, Netherlands. Raoul.vanVugt@gmail.com. R.vanvugt@chir.umcn.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 DEC 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Trauma is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide, and in people younger than 40 years of age, it is the leading cause of death. During the resuscitation of trauma patients at the emergency department, there are two different commonly used diagnostic strategies. Conventionally, there is the use of physical examination and conventional diagnostic imaging, potentially followed by selective use of computed tomography (CT). Alternatively, there is the use of physical examination and conventional diagnostics, followed by a routine (instead of selective) use of thoracoabdominal CT. It is currently unknown which of the two strategies is the better diagnostic strategy for patients with blunt high-energy trauma.

Objectives

To assess the effects of routine thoracoabdominal CT compared with selective thoracoabdominal CT on mortality in blunt high-energy trauma patients.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4, 2013); MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP) and CINAHL for all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We did not restrict the searches by language, date or publication status. We conducted the search on the 9 May 2013.

Selection criteria

We included RCTs of trauma resuscitation algorithms using routine thoracoabdominal CT versus algorithms using selective CT in this review. We included all blunt high-energy trauma patients (including blast or barotrauma).

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently evaluated the search results.

Main results

The systematic search identified 481 references; after removal of duplicates, 396 remained. We found no RCTs comparing routine versus selective thoracoabdominal CT in blunt high-energy trauma patients. We excluded 381 studies based on the abstracts of the publications because of irrelevance to the review topic, and a further 15 studies after full-text evaluation.

Authors' conclusions

We found no RCTs of routine versus selective thoracoabdominal CT in patients with blunt high-energy trauma. Based on the lack of evidence from RCTs, it is not possible to say which approach is better in reducing deaths.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Regular or selected use of computed tomography (CT) scanning to reduce deaths in people who have a high-energy blunt-traumatic injury

Background

Trauma is the fifth leading cause of death in the world, and in people younger than 40 years of age, it is the leading cause of death. Since the 2000s, computed tomography (CT) has been increasingly used in the trauma bay. It is more sensitive and specific than conventional radiography and ultrasonography. By the 2010s, with technical and infrastructural improvements, CT has evolved into a reliable and important method of diagnostic imaging in trauma.

Blunt injury may occur following a direct impact (e.g. forced against a steering wheel or floor) or an indirect impact (e.g. acceleration-deceleration). It is difficult to identify which part of the body is injured following blunt injury and quick and accurate diagnoses are essential to reduce disability and death. The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) system is the most commonly used approach and involves a clinical examination and use of diagnostic methods that recognise the most life-threatening injuries that should be treated first. In the ATLS® approach, conventional diagnostic imaging is performed first (e.g. X-rays and focused abdominal sonography), followed by selective use of CT of specific body regions if required. In contrast, the use of routine thoracoabdominal (chest and abdomen) CT ensures that therapeutic decisions can be made based on detailed anatomical information of the injuries rather than clinical suspicion. This may lead to quicker and more accurate assessment of injuries present. Consequently, this may lead to improved outcomes.

Study characteristics

We searched medical databases for publications of randomised controlled trials (a clinical study where participants are randomly allocated into treatment groups) comparing the usual approach versus selected use of CT scanning. We included studies of all types of blunt trauma and excluded studies with people with penetrating injuries (e.g. gunshot or knife wounds) and pregnant women. The searches are up-to-date to May 2013.

Key results

We found no published or ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared routine versus selective thoracoabdominal CT in blunt-trauma patients. At this time, it is not possible to say which approach is better for patients, or reduces death.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La tomodensitométrie sélective informatisée (TDM) par rapport à la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal

Contexte

Le traumatisme est la cinquième cause de décès dans le monde et la principale cause de décès chez les patients âgés de moins de 40 ans. Pendant la réanimation aux services des urgences de patients souffrant d’un traumatisme, deux diagnostiques de stratégies différentes sont utilisés. Ordinairement, l'examen physique et l'imagerie diagnostique conventionnelle, potentiellement suivis d'une tomodensitométrie sélective (TDM). Alternativement, l'examen physique et le diagnostic classique, suivis d'une couverture diagnostique, sont utilisés, suivis d'une TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine (au lieu d’une TDM sélective). On ne sait pas actuellement laquelle des deux stratégies est la plus efficace pour effectuer un diagnostic chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine par rapport à la TDM thoraco-abdominale sélective au niveau de la mortalité chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les blessures, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (numéro 4, 2013) ; MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP) et CINAHL pour tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) publiés. Nous n'avons pas appliqué de restriction concernant la langue, la date ou le statut de publication. Nous avons effectué la recherche en date du 9 mai 2013.

Critères de sélection

Dans cette revue, nous avons inclus des ECR d’algorithmes sur la réanimation traumatologique utilisant la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine par rapport à la TDM sélective. Nous avons inclus tous les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal (y compris les accidents du souffle ou les barotraumatismes).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les résultats de la recherche.

Résultats Principaux

La recherche systématique a identifié 481 références bibliographiques; après l'ablation des doublons, il en restait 396. Nous n'avons trouvé aucun ECR comparant la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine versus la TDM sélective chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal. Nous avons exclu 381 études sur la base des résumés des publications en raison du manque de rapport pour le sujet de la revue et 15 autres études après une évaluation du texte intégral.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'ECR comparant la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine versus la TDM sélective chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal. Basé sur le manque de preuves issues des ECR, il n'est pas possible de déterminer l’approche la plus efficace pour réduire les décès.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La tomodensitométrie sélective informatisée (TDM) par rapport à la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine chez les patients souffrant d’un traumatisme contondant brutal

La tomodensitométrie informatisée (TDM) sélective ou régulière pour réduire les décès chez les patients atteints d’un traumatisme contondant brutal

Contexte

Le traumatisme est la cinquième cause de décès dans le monde et la principale cause de décès chez les patients âgés de moins de 40 ans. Depuis les années 2000, la tomodensitométrie (TDM) a été de plus en plus utilisée pour les traumatismes. Elle est plus sensible et plus spécifique que la radiographie conventionnelle et l'échographie. Depuis les années 2010, grâce aux améliorations techniques et infrastructurelles, la TDM est devenue une méthode fiable et importante de l'imagerie diagnostique pour les traumatismes.

Les lésions brutales peuvent se produire après un impact direct (par exemple contre un volant ou le sol) ou un impact indirect (par exemple, par l’accélération-décélération). Il est difficile d'identifier quelle partie du corps est blessée suite à une lésion brutale et un diagnostic rapide et précis est essentiel pour réduire l’incapacité et la mortalité. Le système de soins avancés de réanimation traumatologique (ATLS ® ) est l'approche la plus couramment utilisée et implique un examen clinique ainsi qu’un diagnostic qui détecte les lésions les plus sévères menaçant le pronostic vital et devant être traitées en priorité. Dans l'approche ATLS ® , l'imagerie diagnostique est réalisée en premier (par exemple par radiographie et par échographie abdominale), suivie, si nécessaire, de l’utilisation sélective de la TDM pour des régions spécifiques du corps. En revanche, l'utilisation de la TDM thoraco-abdominale routinière (thorax et abdomen) garantie des décisions thérapeutiques fondées sur des informations anatomiques détaillées des lésions plutôt qu'une suspicion clinique. Cela peut conduire à une évaluation plus rapide et plus précise des lésions présentes. Par conséquent, cela pourrait conduire à de meilleurs résultats.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données médicales afin de trouver des publications d'essais contrôlés randomisés (une étude clinique dans laquelle les participants sont assignés de manière aléatoire dans les groupes de traitement) comparant l'approche classique par rapport à la tomodensitométrie sélective. Nous avons inclus des études de tous types de traumatismes contondants et exclu les études avec des patients atteints de blessures pénétrantes (par exemple les plaies par balle ou par couteau) et les femmes enceintes. Les recherches étaient à jour en mai 2013.

Résultats principaux

Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'essais contrôlés randomisés publiés ou en cours qui comparaient la TDM thoraco-abdominale de routine par rapport à la TDM sélective chez les patients atteints de traumatisme contondant. À ce stade, il n'est pas possible de déterminer la meilleure approche pour les patients ou pour réduire la mortalité.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé