Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Red cell transfusion management for patients undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease

  1. Kirstin L Wilkinson1,*,
  2. Susan J Brunskill2,
  3. Carolyn Doree2,
  4. Marialena Trivella3,
  5. Ravi Gill4,
  6. Michael F Murphy5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Heart Group

Published Online: 7 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 11 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009752.pub2


How to Cite

Wilkinson KL, Brunskill SJ, Doree C, Trivella M, Gill R, Murphy MF. Red cell transfusion management for patients undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD009752. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009752.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Southampton University NHS Hospital, Paediatric and Adult Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, Southampton, UK

  2. 2

    NHS Blood and Transplant, Systematic Review Initiative, Oxford, Oxon, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Oxford, UK

  4. 4

    Southampton University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthetics, Southampton, Hampshire, UK

  5. 5

    John Radcliffe Hospital, NHS Blood and Transplant, Oxford, UK

*Kirstin L Wilkinson, Paediatric and Adult Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, Southampton University NHS Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK. kirstinwilkinson@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 7 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Congenital heart disease is the most commonly diagnosed neonatal congenital condition. Without surgery, only 30% to 40% of patients affected will survive to 10 years old. Mortality has fallen since the 1990s with 2006 to 2007 figures showing surgical survival at one year of 95%. Patients with congenital heart disease are potentially exposed to red cell transfusion at many points in the surgical pathway. There are a number of risks associated with red cell transfusion that may be translated into increased patient morbidity and mortality.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of red cell transfusion on mortality and morbidity on patients with congenital heart disease at the time of cardiac surgery.

Search methods

We searched 11 bibliographic databases and three ongoing trials databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 5, 2013), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1950 to 11 June 2013), EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 11 June 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP and the ISRCTN Register (to June 2013). We also searched references of all identified trials, relevant review articles and abstracts from between 2006 and 2010 of the most relevant conferences. We did not limit the searches by language of publication.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing red cell transfusion interventions in patients undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. We included participants of any age (neonates, paediatrics and adults) and with any type of congenital heart disease (cyanotic or acyanotic). We excluded patients with congenital heart disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery. No co-morbidities were excluded.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information.

Main results

We identified 11 trials (862 participants). All trials were in neonatal or paediatric populations. The trials covered only three areas of interest: restrictive versus liberal transfusion triggers (two trials), leukoreduction versus non-leukoreduction (two trials) and standard versus non-standard cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) prime (seven trials). Owing to the clinical diversity in the participant groups (cyanotic (three trials), acyanotic (four trials) or mixed (four trials)) and the intervention groups, it was not appropriate to pool data in a meta-analysis. No study reported data for all the outcomes of interest to this review. Risk of bias was mixed across the included trials, with only attrition bias being low across all trials. Blinding of study personnel and participants was not always possible, depending on the intervention being used.

Five trials (628 participants) reported the primary outcome: 30-day mortality. In three trials (a trial evaluating restrictive and liberal transfusion (125 participants), a trial of cell salvage during CPB (309 participants) and a trial of washed red blood cells during CPB (128 participants)), there was no clear difference in mortality at 30 days between the intervention arms. In two trials comparing standard and non-standard CPB prime, there were no deaths in either randomised group. Long-term mortality was similar between randomised groups in one trial each comparing restrictive and liberal transfusion or standard and non-standard CPB prime.

Four trials explored a range of adverse effects following red cell transfusion. Kidney failure was the only adverse event that was significantly different: patients receiving cell salvaged red blood cells during CPB were less likely to have renal failure than patients not exposed to cell salvage (risk ratio (RR) 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 0.79, 1 study, 309 participants). There was insufficient evidence to determine whether there was a difference between transfusion strategies for any other severe adverse events.

The duration of mechanical ventilation was measured in seven trials (768 participants). Overall, there was no consistent difference in the duration of mechanical ventilation between the intervention and control arms.

The duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay was measured in six trials (459 participants). There was no clear difference in the duration of ICU stay between the intervention arms in the transfusion trigger and leukoreduction trials. In the standard versus non-standard CPB prime trials, one trial examining the impact of washing transfused bypass prime red blood cells showed no clear difference in duration of ICU stay between the intervention arms, while the trial assessing ultrafiltration of the priming blood showed a shorter duration of ICU stay in the ultrafiltration group.

Authors' conclusions

There are only a small number of small and heterogeneous trials so there is insufficient evidence to assess the impact of red cell transfusion on patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery accurately. It is possible that the presence or absence of cyanosis impacts on trial outcomes, which would necessitate different clinical management of two groups. Further adequately powered, specific, high-quality trials are warranted to assess this fully.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Blood transfusions in patients with heart problems requiring surgery on their heart

This review aims to determine the current evidence on the impact of red blood cell transfusion on patients born with heart problems undergoing heart surgery.

Background

Between four and nine children out of every 1000 born alive have hearts that have not formed properly. Heart surgery may allow a child to live and grow or may correct the defect in children and adults alike. Patients often need red blood cell transfusions during or after heart surgery. Most patients will have the surgery on a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) machine, which acts as the heart and lungs during the operation. More patients are now surviving heart surgery and the aim is to make surgery even safer. Some research suggests that red blood cell transfusions may make people more ill.

Study characteristics

We searched scientific sources to identify eligible trials and found 11 studies with 862 participants. We found no trials including adults. The identified studies examined three treatments: two trials compared giving a red blood cell transfusion only when the levels of haemoglobin in the blood fell below a certain concentration (known as a restrictive versus a liberal transfusion trigger); two trials compared whether there was a benefit to removing white blood cells (leukocytes) from the transfused red blood cells and seven trials compared methods used to prepare the fluid for the CPB machine. The trials were different in terms of the age of the participants, the type of heart disease and the exact treatment studied so there was been no opportunity to pool data for analysis. All studies did not report on all outcomes (a measure of a participant's clinical and functional status that is used to assess the effectiveness of a treatment, e.g. death, side effects).

Key results

Our primary outcome was death within 30 days after surgery. Five trials looked at this outcome and found no clear difference in mortality between the treatment arms. Four trials explored other adverse effects following a red blood cell transfusion. A difference in the number of adverse events was only observed for kidney failure: in one trial (with 309 participants), patients receiving cell salvaged red blood cells during CPB were less likely to have renal failure than patients not exposed to cell salvage.

Quality of the evidence

This review identified only a few, small studies across three interventions. These studies measured many different aspects of red blood cell transfusion in patients having heart surgery so it is difficult to make accurate conclusions about the benefits or risks of red blood cell transfusion for these patients. More research is needed to allow accurate conclusions. Future studies should be bigger and focus on one aspect of transfusion in a specific type of heart disease.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Gestion de la transfusion de globules rouges chez les patients subissant une chirurgie cardiaque pour une cardiopathie congénitale

Contexte

La cardiopathie congénitale est l'affection congénitale néonatale le plus fréquemment diagnostiquée. Sans chirurgie, seulement 30 % à 40 % des patients atteints survivent jusqu'à 10 ans. La mortalité a considérablement diminué depuis les années 1990, les chiffres pour 2006 à 2007 montrant une survie chirurgicale à un an de 95 %. Les patients atteints de cardiopathie congénitale sont potentiellement exposés à la transfusion de globules rouges à de nombreux points de leurs parcours chirurgical. Il existe un certain nombre de risques associés à la transfusion de globules rouges qui peuvent se traduire par une augmentation de la morbidité du patient et de la mortalité.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la transfusion de globules rouges au moment de la chirurgie cardiaque sur la mortalité et la morbidité chez les patients atteints de cardiopathie congénitale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans 11 bases de données bibliographiques et trois bases de données d'essais en cours, y compris le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 5, 2013), MEDLINE (Ovid, de 1950 au 11 juin 2013), EMBASE (Ovid, de 1980 au 11 juin 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS) et le registre ISRCTN (jusqu'à juin 2013). Nous avons également consulté les références bibliographiques de tous les essais identifiés, les articles de revue pertinents et les résumés des conférences les plus pertinentes entre 2006 et 2010. Nous n'avons pas limité les recherches par langue de publication.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant des interventions de transfusion de globules rouges chez les patients subissant une chirurgie cardiaque pour une cardiopathie congénitale. Nous avons inclus les participants de tout âge (nouveau-nés, pédiatriques et adultes) et avec tout type de cardiopathie congénitale (cyanogène ou non). Nous avons exclu les patients atteints de cardiopathie congénitale subissant une chirurgie non cardiaque. Aucune co-morbidité n'a été exclue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données. Nous avons contacté les auteurs des études pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons identifié 11 essais (862 participants). Tous portaient sur des populations néonatales ou pédiatriques. Les essais couvraient seulement trois domaines d'intérêt : seuils de transfusion restrictifs versus libéraux (deux essais), leucoréduction versus non-leucoréduction (deux essais) et amorçage standard versus non standard du circuit de circulation extracorporelle (CEC) (sept essais). En raison de la diversité clinique dans les groupes de participants (cyanogène (trois essais), non cyanogène (quatre essais) ou mixte (quatre essais)) et les groupes d'intervention, le regroupement des données dans une méta-analyse n'était pas indiqué. Aucune étude n'a rapporté de données pour tous les critères de jugement intéressants pour cette revue. Le risque de biais était mitigé parmi les essais inclus, seul le biais d'attrition ayant été faible dans tous les essais. La mise en aveugle du personnel et des participants n'a pas toujours été possible, selon l'intervention utilisée.

Cinq essais (628 participants) rendaient compte du principal critère de jugement, la mortalité à 30 jours. Dans trois essais (un essai évaluant la transfusion restrictive et libérale (125 participants), un essai sur l'épargne cellulaire au cours de la CEC (309 participants) et un essai sur des globules rouges lavés au cours de la CEC (128 participants)), il n'y avait aucune différence claire dans la mortalité à 30 jours entre les bras d'intervention. Dans deux essais comparant un amorçage standard et non standard du circuit de CEC, aucun décès n'était rapporté dans aucun des groupes randomisés. La mortalité était similaire entre les groupes randomisés dans un essai comparant la transfusion restrictive et libérale ou l'amorçage standard et non standard de la CEC.

Quatre essais examinaient un certain nombre d'effets indésirables suite à la transfusion de globules rouges. L'insuffisance rénale était le seul événement indésirable avec une différence significative : les patients recevant leurs propres globules rouges récupérés au cours de la CEC étaient moins susceptibles de souffrir d'insuffisance rénale que les patients non exposés à l'épargne cellulaire (risque relatif (RR) 0,26, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,09 à 0,79, 1 étude, 309 participants). Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer s'il y avait une différence entre les stratégies de transfusion pour d'autres événements indésirables graves.

La durée de la ventilation mécanique a été mesurée dans sept essais (768 participants). Dans l'ensemble, il n'y avait aucune différence cohérente dans la durée de ventilation mécanique entre les groupes d'intervention et témoin.

La durée de séjour en unité de soins intensifs (USI) a été mesurée dans six essais (459 participants). Il n'y avait aucune différence claire dans la durée de séjour en USI entre les bras d'intervention dans les essais portant sur les seuils de transfusion et la leucoréduction. Parmi les essais sur l'amorçage standard ou non standard du circuit de CEC, un essai examinant l'impact du lavage des globules rouges transfusés en amorçage de la CEC ne montrait aucune différence claire dans la durée du séjour en USI entre les bras d'intervention, tandis que l'essai évaluant l'ultrafiltration du sang en amorçage de la CEC a montré une réduction de la durée du séjour en USI dans le groupe d'ultrafiltration.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe qu'un petit nombre d'essais hétérogènes de petite taille sur cette question, de sorte qu'il n'y a pas suffisamment de preuves pour évaluer avec précision l'impact de la transfusion de globules rouges chez les patients atteints de cardiopathie congénitale subissant une chirurgie cardiaque. Il est possible que la présence ou l'absence de cyanose ait un impact sur les résultats des essais, ce qui nécessiterait une prise en charge clinique différente des deux groupes. D'autres essais spécifiques de haute qualité avec une puissance adéquate sont nécessaires pour évaluer cette question de manière exhaustive.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Transfusions sanguines chez les patients souffrant de problèmes cardiaques nécessitant une intervention chirurgicale sur leur cœur

Cette revue vise à déterminer les preuves actuelles sur l'impact de la transfusion de globules rouges chez les patients atteints de problèmes cardiaques à la naissance subissant une chirurgie cardiaque.

Contexte

Entre quatre et neuf enfants sur 1 000 naissant vivants ont des malformations au cœur. La chirurgie cardiaque peut permettre à un enfant de vivre et de grandir, ou elle peut corriger cette malformation chez les enfants ainsi que les adultes. Les patients ont généralement besoin de transfusions de globules rouges pendant ou après une chirurgie cardiaque. La plupart des patients subissent l'opération sur un appareil de circulation extracorporelle (CEC), qui agit comme le cœur et les poumons du patient au cours de l'opération. Davantage de patients survivent désormais à la chirurgie cardiaque et l'objectif est de la rendre encore plus sûre. Certaines recherches suggèrent que les transfusions de globules rouges peuvent rendre les patients plus malades.

Caractéristiques des études

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les sources scientifiques pour identifier des essais éligibles et avons trouvé 11 études totalisant 862 participants. Nous n'avons trouvé aucun essai portant sur des adultes. Les études identifiées examinaient trois types de traitements : deux essais comparaient l'administration d'une transfusion de globules rouges uniquement lorsque les taux d'hémoglobine dans le sang descendaient en-dessous d'un certain niveau (appelé seuil de transfusion restrictif ou libéral) ; deux essais examinaient si le fait de retirer les globules blancs (leucocytes) des globules rouges transfusés présentait un avantage et sept essais comparaient des méthodes utilisées pour préparer le fluide pour l'appareil de CEC. Les essais étaient différents en termes de l'âge des participants, du type de maladie cardiaque et du traitement précisément étudié, et il n'a donc pas été possible de combiner les données pour analyse. Toutes les études ne documentaient pas tous les critères de jugement (une mesure du statut clinique et fonctionnel du participant utilisée pour évaluer l'efficacité d'un traitement, par ex. décès, effets secondaires).

Résultats principaux

Notre critère de jugement principal était la mortalité dans les 30 jours après l'opération. Cinq essais examinaient ce critère de jugement et n'ont trouvé aucune différence claire dans la mortalité entre les groupes de traitement. Quatre essais étudiaient d'autres effets indésirables suite à une transfusion de globules rouges. Une différence dans le nombre d'événements indésirables n'a été observée que pour l'insuffisance rénale : dans un essai (avec 309 participants), les patients recevant dans le circuit de CEC leurs propres globules rouges récupérés étaient moins susceptibles de souffrir d'insuffisance rénale que les patients non exposés à cette épargne cellulaire.

Qualité des preuves

Cette revue n'a identifié que quelques petites études portant sur trois types d'interventions. Ces études mesuraient plusieurs aspects différents de la transfusion de globules rouges chez les patients subissant une chirurgie cardiaque, de sorte qu'il est difficile de tirer des conclusions précises concernant les bénéfices ou les risques de la transfusion de globules rouges pour ces patients. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires afin de parvenir à des conclusions adéquates. Les études futures devraient être à plus grande échelle et se concentrer sur un aspect de la transfusion dans un type spécifique de maladie cardiaque.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé