Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Anaesthetic regimens for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Jessica Vaughan1,
  2. Myura Nagendran2,
  3. Jacqueline Cooper3,
  4. Brian R Davidson1,
  5. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 24 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009784.pub2


How to Cite

Vaughan J, Nagendran M, Cooper J, Davidson BR, Gurusamy KS. Anaesthetic regimens for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009784. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009784.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Surgery, UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, London, UK

  3. 3

    Royal Free Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, London, NW3 2QG, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 24 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Day surgery involves admission of selected patients to hospital for a planned surgical procedure with the patients returning home on the same day. An anaesthetic regimen usually involves a combination of an anxiolytic, an induction agent, a maintenance agent, a method of maintaining the airway (laryngeal mask versus endotracheal intubation), and a muscle relaxant. The effect of anaesthesia may continue after the completion of surgery and can delay discharge. Various regimens of anaesthesia have been suggested for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Objectives

To compare the benefits and harms of different anaesthetic regimens (risks of mortality and morbidity, measures of recovery after surgery) in patients undergoing day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 10, 2013), MEDLINE (PubMed) (1987 to November 2013), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1987 to November 2013), Science Citation Index Expanded (ISI Web of Knowledge) (1987 to November 2013), LILACS (Virtual Health Library) (1987 to November 2013), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/mrct/) (November 2013), World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) portal (November 2013), and ClinicalTrials.gov (November 2013).

Selection criteria

We included randomized clinical trials comparing different anaesthetic regimens during elective day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy (irrespective of language or publication status).

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We calculated the risk ratio, rate ratio or mean difference with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat or available data analysis.

Main results

We included 11 trials involving 1069 participants at low anaesthetic risk. The sample size varied from 40 to 300 participants. We included 23 comparisons. All trials were at a high risk of bias. We were unable to perform a meta-analysis because there were no two trials involving the same comparison. Primary outcomes included perioperative mortality, serious morbidity and proportion of patients who were discharged on the same day. There were no perioperative deaths or serious adverse events in either group in the only trial that reported this information (0/60). There was no clear evidence of a difference in the proportion of patients who were discharged on the same day between any of the comparisons. Overall, 472/554 patients (85%) included in this review were discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients. Secondary outcomes included hospital readmissions, health-related quality of life, pain, return to activity and return to work. There was no clear evidence of a difference in hospital readmissions within 30 days in the only comparison in which this outcome was reported. One readmission was reported in the 60 patients (2%) in whom this outcome was assessed. Quality of life was not reported in any of the trials. There was no clear evidence of a difference in the pain intensity, measured by a visual analogue scale, between comparators in the only trial which reported the pain intensity at between four and eight hours after surgery. Times to return to activity and return to work were not reported in any of the trials.

Authors' conclusions

There is currently insufficient evidence to conclude that one anaesthetic regimen for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy is to be preferred over another. However, the data are sparse (that is, there were few trials under each comparison and the trials had few participants) and further well designed randomized trials at low risk of bias and which are powered to measure differences in clinically important outcomes are necessary to determine the optimal anaesthetic regimen for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the commonest procedures performed in the western world.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anaesthetic regimens for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Background

Approximately 50 to 250 out of every 1000 adults in the western world have gallstones. Of every 100 people with gallstones, two to four people develop symptoms such as pain in the upper abdomen. This condition is treated by surgical removal of the gallbladder through 'keyhole surgery', a procedure that is known as laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It is possible to perform the operation and allow the patient to go home on the same day ('day surgery'). During surgery, the patient is given a range of medicines to provide lack of awareness of the procedure undertaken, reduce pain, and relax muscles (allowing the surgeon adequate access and vision). Together, this is called an anaesthetic regimen. Many different anaesthetic regimens have been suggested for use in day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We sought to find the best anaesthetic regimen by performing a thorough search of the literature for randomized controlled trials, reported until November 2013.

Study characteristics

We included 11 trials involving 1069 patients in this review. Most participants in the trials had a low anaesthetic risk.

Key results

There were no deaths or serious complications in the only trial that reported this information. Overall, 85% of patients (472/554) were discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients and 2% of patients (1/60) required hospital readmission. The reasons for not discharging the patients as day-procedure patients were not described in detail in the trials. The reason for readmission was fever that developed in the patient and which subsequently settled on its own without any treatment. Quality of life was not reported in any of the trials. There was no clear evidence of a difference in the measures of pain intensity between any of the comparisons. Time to return to routine daily activity and to return to work were not reported in any of the trials. There is currently no evidence to support one anaesthetic regimen for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy over another.

Quality of evidence

All the trials had elements that tended to reduce our trust in the accuracy of the results. Few patients were included in each comparison resulting in a considerable chance of arriving at erroneous conclusions.

Future research

Randomized controlled trials designed to minimize the risk of arriving at wrong conclusions are necessary to determine the best anaesthetic regimen for day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the commonest procedures performed in the western world.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Schémas d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire

Contexte

La chirurgie ambulatoire implique l'admission à l'hôpital de patients sélectionnés pour une procédure chirurgicale planifiée avec les patients retournant à leur domicile le jour même. Un schéma d'anesthésie implique habituellement une combinaison d'anxiolytique, un agent d'induction, un agent d'entretien, une méthode maintenant les voies respiratoires (un masque laryngé par rapport à l'intubation endotrachéale), et un myorelaxant. L'effet de l'anesthésie peut se poursuivre après l'achèvement de la chirurgie et peut retarder la sortie d'hôpital. Différents schémas d'anesthésie ont été suggérés pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices et les préjudices des différents schémas d'anesthésie (risques de mortalité et de morbidité, les mesures de la récupération après la chirurgie) chez les patients subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) dans la Bibliothèque Cochrane (numéro 10, 2013), MEDLINE (PubMed) (de 1987 à novembre 2013), EMBASE (OvidSP) (de 1987 à novembre 2013), Science Citation Index Expanded (ISI Web of Knowledge) (de 1987 à novembre 2013), LILACS (Virtual Health Library) (de 1987 à novembre 2013), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/mrct) (novembre 2013), de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) de l'OMS (novembre 2013), et ClinicalTrials.gov (novembre 2013).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais cliniques randomisés comparant différents schémas d'anesthésie pendant la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire (indépendamment de la langue ou du statut de publication).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les essais à inclure et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif, le rapport des taux ou la différence moyenne avec un intervalle de confiance à 95 % sur la base des analyses d'intention de traiter ou des données disponibles.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais portant sur 1 069 participants à faible risque anesthésique. La taille des échantillons variaient de 40 à 300 participants. Nous avons inclus 23 comparaisons. Tous les essais étaient à risque de biais élevé. Nous n'avons pas été en mesure de réaliser une méta-analyse, car il n'y avait pas deux essais portant sur la même comparaison. Les principaux critères de jugement incluaient la mortalité périopératoire, la morbidité grave et la proportion de patients libérés le jour même. Dans le seul essai ayant rendu compte de ces informations, il n'y avait dans aucun des groupes ni décès périopératoires, ni effets indésirables graves (0/60). Entre les diverses comparaisons, il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence dans la proportion de patients libérés le même jour. Dans l'ensemble, 472/554 patients (85 %) inclus dans cette revue sont sortis de l'hôpital suite à une cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire. Les critères de jugement secondaires incluaient les réadmissions à l'hôpital, la qualité de vie liée à la santé, la douleur, la reprise des activités et le retour au travail. Dans la seule comparaison qui rapportait ce résultat, il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence au niveau des réadmissions à l'hôpital dans les 30 jours. Une réhospitalisation a été signalée chez 60 patients (2 %) dans lesquelles ce résultat a été évalué. La qualité de vie n'était rapportée dans aucun des essais. Il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence au niveau de l'intensité de la douleur, mesurée par une échelle visuelle analogique, entre les comparateurs dans le seul essai qui rapportait l'intensité de la douleur 4 et 8 heures après la chirurgie. Les périodes de reprise des activités et du retour au travail n'étaient rapportées dans aucun des essais.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe actuellement pas suffisamment de preuves pour conclure qu'un schéma d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire soit préféré par rapport à un autre. Cependant, les données sont rares (il y avait peu d'essais pour chaque comparaison et les essais avaient peu de participants) et d'autres essais randomisés, bien conçus, à faible risque de biais et de puissance suffisante pour mesurer les différences dans les résultats cliniquement importants, sont nécessaires pour déterminer le meilleur schéma d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire, l'une des procédures les plus couramment réalisée dans le monde occidental.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Schémas d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire

Contexte

Environ 50 à 250 sur 1 000 adultes dans le monde occidental souffrent de calculs biliaires. Sur 100 personnes souffrant de calculs biliaires, 2 à 4 patients développent des symptômes tels qu'une douleur dans le haut de l'abdomen. Cette affection est traitée par l'ablation chirurgicale de la vésicule biliaire à travers une chirurgie endoscopique, une procédure qui est connue sous le nom de cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Il est possible de procéder à l'opération et de permettre au patient de rentrer à son domicile le jour même (« chirurgie ambulatoire »). Pendant la chirurgie, le patient reçoit un éventail de médicaments pour fournir un manque de prise de conscience de la procédure, réduire la douleur et détendre les muscles (permettant au chirurgien un accès et une vision adéquats). Ensemble, cela se nomme un schéma d'anesthésie. De nombreux schémas d'anesthésie ont été suggérés pour utiliser dans la chirurgie ambulatoire de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique. Nous avons cherché à déterminer le meilleur schéma d'anesthésie par une recherche exhaustive de la littérature des essais contrôlés randomisés, rapportés jusqu'en novembre 2013.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Dans cette revue, nous avons inclus 11 essais portant sur 1 069 patients. La plupart des participants dans les essais présentaient un faible risque anesthésique.

Résultats principaux

Il n'y avait pas de décès ou de complications graves dans le seul essai ayant rendu compte de cette information. Dans l'ensemble, 85% des patients (472/554) rentraient à leur domicile suite à une chirurgie ambulatoire pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique et 2% des patients (1/60) nécessitaient une réadmission à l'hôpital. Les raisons de ne pas autoriser les patients subissant une chirurgie ambulatoire à quitter l'hôpital n'étaient pas détaillées dans les essais. Les raisons de la réadmission étaient la fièvre développée chez le patient et qui par la suite disparaissait spontanément, sans traitement. La qualité de vie n'était rapportée dans aucun des essais. Il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence dans les mesures d'intensité de la douleur entre les comparaisons. Les délais de reprise des activités quotidiennes et du retour au travail n'étaient rapportés dans aucun des essais. Il n'existe actuellement aucune preuve permettant de recommander un schéma d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire par rapport à un autre.

Qualité des preuves

Tous les essais comportaient des éléments qui tendaient à réduire notre confiance dans l'exactitude des résultats. Dans chaque comparaison, peu de patients étaient inclus, entraînant un risque considérable de fournir des conclusions erronées.

Les recherches futures

Des essais contrôlés randomisés conçus pour minimiser le risque de conclusions erronées sont nécessaires pour déterminer le meilleur schéma d'anesthésie pour la cholécystectomie laparoscopique pratiquée en chirurgie ambulatoire, l'une des procédures les plus couramment réalisée dans le monde occidental.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé