Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Dexmedetomidine for the management of awake fibreoptic intubation

  1. Xing-Ying He1,
  2. Jian-Ping Cao2,
  3. Qian He3,
  4. Xue-Yin Shi1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 19 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 9 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009798.pub2


How to Cite

He XY, Cao JP, He Q, Shi XY. Dexmedetomidine for the management of awake fibreoptic intubation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD009798. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009798.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Changzheng Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Department of Anaesthesiology, Shanghai, China

  2. 2

    455 Hospital of the PLA, Department of Anaesthesiology, Shanghai, China

  3. 3

    The Second Military Medical University, Department of Health Statistics, Faculty of Health Services, Shanghai, China

*Xue-Yin Shi, Department of Anaesthesiology, Changzheng Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Fengyang Road 415, Shanghai, 200003, China. shixueyin1128@163.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 19 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Awake fibreoptic intubation (AFOI) frequently requires sedation, anxiolysis and relief of discomfort without impairing ventilation and depressing cardiovascular function. The goal is to allow the patient to be responsive and co-operative. Medications such as fentanyl, remifentanil, midazolam and propofol have been reported to assist AFOI; however,these agents are associated with cardiovascular or respiratory adverse effects. Dexmedetomidine has been proposed as an alternative to facilitate AFOI.

Objectives

The primary objective of this review is to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine in the management of patients with a difficult or unstable airway undergoing awake fibreoptic intubation (AFOI).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2012, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2012) through Ovid, EMBASE (1980 to May 2012) and Web of Science (1945 to May 2012); we screened the reference lists of all eligible trials and reviews to look for further trials and contacted authors of trials to ask for additional information. We searched for ongoing trials at http://www.controlledtrials.com/ and http://clinicaltrials.gov/ . We reran our search of all databases listed above on 21 November 2013.

Selection criteria

We included published and unpublished randomized controlled trials, regardless of blinding or language of publication, in participants 18 years of age or older who were scheduled for an elective AFOI because of an anticipated difficult airway. Participants received dexmedetomidine or control medications.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently extracted data on study design, participants, interventions and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias using The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) or mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence internals (CIs) for outcomes with sufficient data; for other outcomes, we performed a qualitative analysis.

Main results

We identified four randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 211 participants. The four trials compared dexmedetomidine with midazolam, fentanyl, propofol or a sodium chloride placebo, respectively. The trials showed low or unclear risk of bias primarily because information provided on allocation concealment and other potential sources of bias was inadequate. Owing to clinical heterogeneity and potential methodological heterogeneity, it was impossible to conduct a full meta-analysis. We described findings from individual studies or presented them in tabular form. Limited evidence was available for assessment of the outcomes of interest for this review. Results of the limited included trials showed that dexmedetomidine significantly reduced participants' discomfort with no significant differences in airway obstruction, low oxygen levels or treatment-emergent cardiovascular adverse events noted during AFOI compared with control groups. When the search was rerun (from May 2012 to November 2013), it was noted that four studies are awaiting assessment. We will deal with these studies when we update the review.

Authors' conclusions

Small, limited trials provide weak evidence to support dexmedetomidine as an option for patients with an anticipated difficult airway who undergo AFOI. The findings of this review should be further corroborated by additional controlled investigations.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Is dexmedetomidine a good option for patients undergoing awake fibreoptic intubation?

This is a review of the clinical evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effect of dexmedetomidine in the management of awake fibreoptic intubation. The review was conducted by researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration. Awake fibreoptic intubation (AFOI) is indicated for the management of patients with a difficult or unstable (critical) airway, such as those with airway deformity or tumour, airway injury or spinal cord instability. It is necessary in such a situation to maintain patient co-operation and reduce patient anxiety without causing severe adverse effects during the AFOI. Many agents, including fentanyl, remifentanil, midazolam and propofol, have been reported to assist with AFOI. However, these agents can cause respiratory arrest, loss of airway control or reduced cardiovascular (heart) function, especially when used in high doses, thus increasing the risk of low oxygen levels (hypoxaemia), aspiration, low blood pressure (hypotension) or slow heart rate (bradycardia).

Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2-adrenoceptor agonist that can cause sedation, anxiolysis, analgesic sparing, reduced salivary secretion and minimal respiratory depression; this might be beneficial for patients with a difficult or unstable airway undergoing AFOI.

We searched the medical literature until May 2012 and identified four randomized controlled trials involving 211 patients that were appropriate for inclusion in the review. These studies compared dexmedetomidine versus midazolam, fentanyl, propofol or a sodium chloride placebo for patients undergoing AFOI. We reran our search in November 2013, and four studies are awaiting assessment. We will deal with them when we update the review.

Dexmedetomidine significantly reduced patient discomfort during AFOI compared with control groups in two included trials. No significant differences in intubation time, airway obstruction, low oxygen levels or treatment-emergent cardiovascular adverse events were reported during AFOI between the dexmedetomidine group and the control group.

Dexmedetomidine did not appear to be inferior to other medications. The data from this evidence database of modest size provide limited evidence to support the use of dexmedetomidine as an alternative or primary choice for AFOI. Further research should focus on this important topic. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to test the exact benefits of dexmedetomidine in the management of AFOI.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La dexmédétomidine pour la prise en charge de l'intubation à fibre optique chez les patients éveillés

Contexte

L'intubation à fibre optique chez les patients éveillés (IFOE) nécessite fréquemment une sédation, un anxiolyse et un soulagement de la gêne, sans altérer la ventilation, ni perturber la fonction cardiovasculaire. L'objectif est de permettre au patient d'être sensible et coopératif. Il a été rapporté que certains médicaments, tels que le fentanyl, le rémifentanil, le midazolam et le propofol étaient utiles lors d'une IFOE; toutefois, ces agents sont associés à des effets respiratoires ou cardio-vasculaires indésirables. La dexmédétomidine a été proposée comme alternative pour faciliter l'IFOE.

Objectifs

L'objectif principal de cette revue est d'évaluer et de comparer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de la dexmédétomidine dans la prise en charge des patients ayant une respiration difficile ou instable et subissant une intubation à fibre optique en restant éveillé (IFOE).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL ; 2012, numéro 5), MEDLINE (de 1966 à mai 2012) via Ovid, EMBASE (de 1980 à mai 2012) et Web of Science (de 1945 à mai 2012) ; nous avons passé au crible les références bibliographiques de tous les essais et de toutes les revues éligibles afin d'identifier d'autres essais et contacté les auteurs des essais pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Nous avons recherché des essais en cours au http://www.controlledtrials.com/ et http://clinicaltrials.gov/ . Nous avons recherché de nouveau toutes les bases de données mentionnées ci-dessus le 21 novembre 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés publiés et non publiés, indépendamment de la mise en aveugle ou de la langue de publication, chez des participants âgés de 18 ans ou plus qui devaient subir une IFOE élective en raison d'une respiration difficile anticipée. Les participants recevaient la dexmédétomidine ou des médicaments témoins.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données du plan d'étude, des participants, des interventions et des critères de jugement. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais à l'aide de l'outil de la Collaboration Cochrane. Nous avons estimé les risques relatifs (RR) ou les différences moyennes (DM) avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% pour les critères de jugement avec suffisamment de données; pour les autres critères de jugement, nous avons effectué une analyse qualitative.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié quatre essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), qui incluaient 211 participants. Les quatre essais comparaient la dexmédétomidine avec le midazolam, le fentanyl, le propofol, le chlorure de sodium ou un placebo, respectivement. Les essais ont montré des risques de biais faibles ou incertains principalement parce que les informations sur l'assignation secrète et les autres sources potentielles de biais étaient inadéquates. En raison de l'hétérogénéité clinique et d'une hétérogénéité méthodologique potentielle, il était impossible de réaliser une méta-analyse. Nous avons décrit les résultats sous forme d'études individuelles ou de tableau. Des preuves limitées étaient disponibles pour évaluer les critères de jugement d'intérêt pour cette revue. Les résultats des essais limités inclus ont montré que la dexmédétomidine entraînait une réduction significative de l'inconfort des participants sans différence significative en termes d'obstruction des voies respiratoires, de faibles niveaux d'oxygène ou de traitement d'effets indésirables cardiovasculaires durant l'IFOE par rapport aux groupes témoins. Lorsque la recherche a été analysée de nouveau (de mai 2012 à novembre 2013), il a été noté que quatre études sont en attente d'évaluation. Nous les traiterons lorsque nous mettrons la revue à jour.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les essais limités, de petite taille, ne fournissent pas assez de preuves pour soutenir la dexmédétomidine comme une option chez les patients qui devaient subir une IFOE élective en raison d'une respiration difficile anticipée. Les résultats de cette revue doivent être confirmés par d'autres examens contrôlés randomisés supplémentaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La dexmédétomidine pour la prise en charge de l'intubation à fibre optique chez les patients éveillés

Est-ce que la dexmédétomidine est une bonne option chez les patients subissant une intubation à fibre optique en restant éveillé ?

Ceci est une revue des données cliniques probantes issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur l'effet de la dexmédétomidine dans la prise en charge de l'intubation à fibre optique chez les patients éveillés. La revue a été effectuée par des chercheurs de la Collaboration Cochrane. L'intubation à fibre optique chez les patients éveillés (IFOE) est indiquée pour la prise en charge des patients ayant une respiration difficile ou instable (critique), tels que ceux atteints de difformité respiratoire ou de tumeur, de lésions au niveau des voies respiratoires ou d'instabilité de la moelle épinière. Dans une telle situation, il est nécessaire de maintenir la coopération des patients et de réduire leur anxiété sans entraîner d'effets indésirables graves au cours de l'IFOE. Il a été rapporté que de nombreux agents, y compris le fentanyl, le rémifentanil, le midazolam et le propofol étaient utiles lors d'une IFOE. Toutefois, ces agents peuvent entraîner un arrêt respiratoire, une perte du contrôle respiratoire ou une réduction de la fonction cardio-vasculaire (cSur), en particulier lorsqu'ils sont utilisés à doses élevées, accroissant le risque de faible niveau d'oxygène (hypoxie), d'aspiration, de faible pression artérielle (hypotension) ou de ralentissement du rythme cardiaque (bradycardie).

La dexmédétomidine est un agoniste sélectif des récepteurs alpha 2-adrénergiques qui peut entraîner une sédation, une anxiolyse, une analgésie limitée, une réduction de la sécrétion salivaire et une détresse respiratoire aiguë; cela pourrait être bénéfique chez les patients souffrant de respiration difficile ou instable et subissant une IFOE.

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la littérature médicale jusqu'en mai 2012 et identifié quatre essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur 211 patients qui pouvaient être inclus dans la revue. Ces études comparaient le midazolam, le fentanyl, la dexmédétomidine par rapport à un placebo, au propofol ou au chlorure de sodium chez les patients subissant une IFOE. Nous avons réitéré notre recherche en novembre 2013 et quatre études sont en attente d'évaluation. Nous les traiterons lorsque nous mettrons la revue à jour.

Dans deux essais inclus, la dexmédétomidine réduisait significativement l'inconfort du patient pendant l'IFOE par rapport aux groupes témoins. Aucune différence significative en termes de temps d'intubation, d'obstruction des voies respiratoires, de faibles niveaux d'oxygène ou de traitement d'effets indésirables cardiovasculaires au cours de l'IFOE n'a été rapportée entre le groupe de dexmédétomidine et le groupe témoin.

La dexmédétomidine ne semblait pas être inférieure à d'autres médicaments. Les données issues de cette base de données de preuves de taille modeste fournissent des preuves limitées pour recommander l'utilisation de la dexmédétomidine, comme une méthode alternative ou privilégiée pour l'IFOE. De nouvelles recherches devraient se concentrer sur cet important sujet. D'autres essais contrôlés randomisés bien planifiés sont nécessaires pour tester les bénéfices exacts de la dexmédétomidine dans la prise en charge de l'IFOE.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé