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Intervention Protocol

Interventions for promoting reintegration and reducing harmful behaviour and lifestyles in street-connected children and young people

  1. Esther Coren1,*,
  2. Rosa Hossain1,
  3. Jordi Pardo Pardo2,
  4. Manuela Thomae1,
  5. Mirella MS Veras2,
  6. Kabita Chakraborty3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Public Health Group

Published Online: 18 APR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009823


How to Cite

Coren E, Hossain R, Pardo Pardo J, Thomae M, Veras MMS, Chakraborty K. Interventions for promoting reintegration and reducing harmful behaviour and lifestyles in street-connected children and young people (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD009823. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009823.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Canterbury Christ Church University, Research Centre for Children, Families and Communities, Canterbury, Kent, UK

  2. 2

    University of Ottawa, Centre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

  3. 3

    University of Melbourne, School of Population Health, Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

*Esther Coren, Research Centre for Children, Families and Communities, Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 1QU, UK. esther.coren@canterbury.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 APR 2012

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

Primary research objectives

To evaluate and summarise the effectiveness of interventions for street-connected children and young people that:

  • promote inclusion and reintegration ;
  • increase literacy and numeracy;
  • increase access to education and employment;
  • promote mental health, including self-esteem; and
  • reduce harms associated with early sexual activity and substance misuse.

Furthermore, to explore what can be known about the processes of successful intervention and models of change in this area, and understand how intervention effectiveness may vary in different contexts.

Secondary research objectives

  1. To explore whether effects of the intervention differ within and between populations, and whether an equity gradient impacts on these effects including and importantly, extrapolating from all findings relevance for low-middle income countries (Peters 2004).
  2. To describe other health, educational, psycho-social, and behavioural effects, where appropriate outcomes are available.
  3. To explore the influence of context in the design, delivery, and outcomes of the interventions.
  4. To explore the relationship between the number of components, duration, and effects of the interventions.
  5. To highlight implications for further research and research methods to improve knowledge of the interventions in relation to the primary research objective.

This review will also consider potential adverse or unintended outcomes. Some outcomes identified in the literature include negative effects of poorly planned or forced interventions (CSC 2011) and detrimental outcomes frequently documented in association with reintegration of children in non-family care into their families of origin (Thoburn 2009). A possible adverse outcome that may, however, not easily be captured in study evaluations is an increase in street-connected children and young people’s mistrust of adults in the context of interventions that may be ad-hoc and short-lived due to lack of funding and other structural support. Study designs that do not provide genuine opportunities for children and young people’s participation throughout the research process are most likely to fail in assessing the full range of outcomes of an intervention (Panter-Brick 2002; Slesnick 2007).