Intervention Review

'Mediterranean' dietary pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

  1. Karen Rees1,*,
  2. Louise Hartley1,
  3. Nadine Flowers1,
  4. Aileen Clarke1,
  5. Lee Hooper2,
  6. Margaret Thorogood3,
  7. Saverio Stranges1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Heart Group

Published Online: 12 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009825.pub2

How to Cite

Rees K, Hartley L, Flowers N, Clarke A, Hooper L, Thorogood M, Stranges S. 'Mediterranean' dietary pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD009825. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009825.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Division of Health Sciences, Coventry, UK

  2. 2

    University of East Anglia, Norwich Medical School, Norwich, UK

  3. 3

    Division of Health Sciences, Public Health and Epidemiology, Coventry, UK

*Karen Rees, Division of Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. Karen.Rees@warwick.ac.uk. rees_karen@yahoo.co.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The Seven Countries study in the 1960s showed that populations in the Mediterranean region experienced lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality probably as a result of different dietary patterns. Later observational studies have confirmed the benefits of adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern on CVD risk factors. Clinical trial evidence is limited, and is mostly in secondary prevention.

Objectives

To determine the effectiveness of a Mediterranean dietary pattern for the primary prevention of CVD.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9 of 12, September 2012); MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to October week 1 2012); EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2012 week 41); ISI Web of Science (1970 to 16 October 2012); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment Database and Health Economics Evaluations Database (Issue 3 of 12, September 2012). We searched trial registers and reference lists of reviews and applied no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

We selected randomised controlled trials in healthy adults and adults at high risk of CVD. A Mediterranean dietary pattern was defined as comprising at least two of the following components: (1) high monounsaturated/saturated fat ratio, (2) low to moderate red wine consumption, (3) high consumption of legumes, (4) high consumption of grains and cereals, (5) high consumption of fruits and vegetables, (6) low consumption of meat and meat products and increased consumption of fish, and (7) moderate consumption of milk and dairy products. The comparison group received either no intervention or minimal intervention. Outcomes included clinical events and CVD risk factors.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and contacted chief investigators to request additional relevant information.

Main results

We included 11 trials (15 papers) (52,044 participants randomised). Trials were heterogeneous in the participants recruited, in the number of dietary components and follow-up periods. Seven trials described the intervention as a Mediterranean diet. Clinical events were reported in only one trial (Women's Health Initiative 48,835 postmenopausal women, intervention not described as a Mediterranean diet but increased fruit and vegetable and cereal intake) where no statistically significant effects of the intervention were seen on fatal and non-fatal endpoints at eight years. Small reductions in total cholesterol (-0.16 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.26 to -0.06; random-effects model) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (-0.07 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.01) were seen with the intervention. Subgroup analyses revealed statistically significant greater reductions in total cholesterol in those trials describing the intervention as a Mediterranean diet (-0.23 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.27 to -0.2) compared with control (-0.06 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.13 to 0.01). Heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses for other outcomes. Reductions in blood pressure were seen in three of five trials reporting this outcome. None of the trials reported adverse events.

Authors' conclusions

The limited evidence to date suggests some favourable effects on cardiovascular risk factors. More comprehensive interventions describing themselves as the Mediterranean diet may produce more beneficial effects on lipid levels than those interventions with fewer dietary components. More trials are needed to examine the impact of heterogeneity of both participants and the intervention on outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mediterranean diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

It is well established that diet plays a major role in cardiovascular disease risk. The traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern is of particular interest because of observations from the 1960s that populations in countries of the Mediterranean region, such as Greece and Italy, had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease compared with northern European populations or the US, probably as a result of different eating habits.

This review assessed the effects of providing dietary advice to follow a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern to healthy adults or people at increased risk of cardiovascular disease in order to prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and reduce the risk factors associated with it. Definitions of a Mediterranean dietary pattern vary and we included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions that reported at least two of the following components: (1) high monounsaturated/saturated fat ratio, (2) low to moderate red wine consumption, (3) high consumption of legumes, (4) high consumption of grains and cereals, (5) high consumption of fruits and vegetables, (6) low consumption of meat and meat products and increased consumption of fish, and (7) moderate consumption of milk and dairy products. The control group was no intervention or minimal intervention. We found 11 RCTs (15 papers) that met these criteria. The trials varied enormously in the participants recruited and the different dietary interventions. Four trials were conducted in women only, two trials were in men only and the remaining five were in both men and women. Five trials were conducted in healthy individuals and six trials were in people at increased risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer. The number of components relevant to a Mediterranean dietary pattern ranged from two to five and only seven trials described the intervention as a Mediterranean diet.

The largest trial, which recruited only postmenopausal women and was not described as a Mediterranean diet meeting only two of the criteria described above, reported no difference in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease between the dietary advice group and the control group. The other trials measured risk factors for cardiovascular disease. As the studies were so different, it was not possible to combine studies for most of the outcomes. Where it was possible to combine studies, we found small reductions in total cholesterol levels as well as in the harmful low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The reductions in total cholesterol were greater in the studies that described themselves as providing a Mediterranean diet. None of the trials reported side effects.

The review concludes that, from the limited evidence to date, a Mediterranean dietary pattern reduces some cardiovascular risk factors. However, more trials are needed to look at the effects of the different participants recruited and the different dietary interventions to see which interventions might work best in different populations.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » pour la prévention primaire des maladies cardiovasculaires

Contexte

L'étude Seven Countries menée dans les années 1960 a montré que les populations du bassin méditerranéen ont souffert d'une mortalité par maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV) plus faible probablement en résultat des différentes habitudes alimentaires. Les études observationnelles postérieures ont confirmé les bénéfices du respect d'un modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » concernant les facteurs de risque MCV. Les preuves issues des essais cliniques sont limitées, et concernent essentiellement la prévention secondaire.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité du modèle de régime alimentaire dit « méditerranéen » pour la prévention primaire des maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 9 sur 12, septembre 2012) ; MEDLINE (Ovid, de 1946 jusqu'à la 1ère semaine du mois d'octobre 2012) ; EMBASE (Ovid, de 1980 jusqu'à la 41ème semaine de l'année 2012) ; ISI Web of Science (de 1970 jusqu'au mardi 16 octobre 2012) ; la base des résumés des revues systématiques hors Cochrane (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)), la base de données d'évaluation des technologies de la santé et la base de données d'évaluation de l'économie de la santé (numéro 3 sur 12, septembre 2012). Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les registres d'essais et les listes bibliographiques des revues et nous n'avons appliqué aucune restriction de langue.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné les essais contrôlés randomisés menés avec des adultes sains et des adultes présentant un risque élevé de MCV. Le modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » a été défini comme comprenant au moins deux des composantes suivantes : (1) un rapport de graisses mono-insaturées/saturées élevé, (2) la consommation faible à modérée de vin rouge, (3) la consommation de légumineuses en grandes quantités, (4) la consommation de graines et de céréales en grandes quantités, (5) la consommation de fruits et de légumes en grandes quantités, (6) la faible consommation de viande et de produits à base de viande et l'augmentation de la consommation de poisson, et (7) la consommation modérée de lait et de produits laitiers. Le groupe de comparaison était l'absence d'intervention ou une intervention minimale. Les critères de jugement comprenaient les événements cliniques et les facteurs de risque MCV.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données et contacté les directeurs des études de recherche pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires pertinentes.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais (15 articles) portant sur 52 044 participants randomisés. Les essais étaient hétérogènes entre les participants recrutés, au niveau du nombre de composantes diététiques et des périodes de suivi. Sept essais ont décrit l'intervention comme étant un régime alimentaire « Méditerranéen ». Des événements cliniques ont été rapportés dans un seul essai (Women's Health Initiative, 48 835 femmes ménopausées, intervention non décrite comme étant un régime alimentaire « Méditerranéen » mais une augmentation de la consommation de fruit et légume et de céréale) dans lequel aucun effet statistiquement significatif de l'intervention n'a été observé sur les critères de jugement mortels et non mortels au bout de huit ans. De petites réductions du taux de cholestérol total (-0,16 mmol/l, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -0,26 à -0,06 ; modèle à effets aléatoires) et de lipoprotéine de basse densité (LDL)-cholestérol (-0,07 mmol/l, IC à 95 % -0,13 à -0,01) ont été constatées avec l'intervention. Les analyses en sous-groupe ont révélé des réductions nettement plus importantes au plan statistique du taux de cholestérol total dans les essais décrivant l'intervention comme étant un régime alimentaire « Méditerranéen » (-0,23 mmol/l, IC à 95 % -0,27 à -0,2) par rapport au témoin (-0,06 mmol/l, IC à 95 % -0,13 à 0,01). L'hétérogénéité a empêché de réaliser des méta-analyses pour d'autres résultats. Des réductions de la pression artérielle ont été notées dans trois des cinq essais ayant rendu compte de ce résultat. Aucun des essais n'a rendu compte des événements indésirables.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves limitées disponibles à ce jour suggèrent certains effets favorables sur les facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires. D'autres interventions approfondies ayant été décrites comme étant un régime alimentaire méditerranéen peuvent produire plus d'effets bénéfiques sur les taux de lipides que les interventions comprenant une quantité réduite de composantes diététiques. D'autres essais sont nécessaires pour examiner les répercussions de l'hétérogénéité des participants ainsi que de l'intervention sur les résultats.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » pour la prévention primaire des maladies cardiovasculaires

Régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » pour la prévention des maladies cardiovasculaires

Il est bien établi à présent que le régime alimentaire joue un rôle majeur dans le risque de maladies cardiovasculaires. Le modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » traditionnel est particulièrement intéressant en raison des observations répétées depuis les années 1960 affirmant que les populations des pays du bassin méditerranéen, tels que la Grèce et l'Italie, avaient une mortalité par maladies cardiovasculaires plus faible comparées aux populations d'Europe du nord ou des États-Unis, probablement en résultat des différentes habitudes alimentaires.

Cette revue a évalué les effets des conseils diététiques pour suivre un modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » proposés à des adultes en bonne santé ou des personnes à risque accru de développer des maladies cardiovasculaires afin de prévenir la survenue de maladies cardiovasculaires et réduire les facteurs de risque qui leur sont associés. Les définitions d'un modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » varient, c'est pourquoi nous n'avons inclus que les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) portant sur des interventions qui ont rendu compte d'au moins deux des composantes suivantes : (1) un rapport de graisses mono-insaturées/saturées élevé, (2) la consommation faible à modérée de vin rouge, (3) la consommation de légumineuses en grandes quantités, (4) la consommation de graines et de céréales en grandes quantités, (5) la consommation de fruits et de légumes en grandes quantités, (6) la faible consommation de viande et de produits à base de viande et l'augmentation de la consommation de poisson, et (7) la consommation modérée de lait et de produits laitiers. Le groupe de comparaison était l'absence d'intervention ou une intervention minimale. Nous avons trouvé 11 ECR (15 articles) qui répondaient à ces critères. Les essais variaient énormément entre les participants recrutés et les différentes interventions diététiques. Quatre essais ont été réalisés avec des femmes uniquement, deux essais ont été réalisés avec des hommes uniquement et les cinq autres ont été réalisés avec des hommes et des femmes. Cinq essais ont été réalisés avec des individus sains et six essais ont été réalisés avec des personnes présentant un risque accru de maladies cardiovasculaires ou de cancer. Le nombre de composantes pertinentes pour le modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » variait entre deux et cinq et seulement sept essais ont décrit l'intervention comme étant un régime alimentaire « Méditerranéen ».

L'essai ayant la plus grande échelle, qui a recruté uniquement des femmes ménopausées et n'a pas été décrit comme étant un régime alimentaire « Méditerranéen » répondant uniquement à deux des critères décrits ci-dessus, n'a rapporté aucune différence au niveau de la survenue des maladies cardiovasculaires entre le groupe bénéficiant de conseils diététiques et le groupe témoin. Les autres essais ont mesuré les facteurs de risque pour les maladies cardiovasculaires. Le niveau de différence entre les études était tel qu'il n'a pas été possible de combiner les résultats des études pour la plupart des critères. Lorsqu'il était possible de combiner les études, nous avons trouvé de petites réductions des taux de cholestérol total ainsi que des concentrations nocives de lipoprotéine de basse densité (LDL)-cholestérol. Les réductions du taux de cholestérol total ont été plus importantes dans les études qui ont été décrites en tant que régime alimentaire méditerranéen. Aucun des essais n'a rendu compte des effets indésirables.

La revue conclut que, d'après les preuves limitées disponibles à ce jour, le modèle de régime alimentaire dit « Méditerranéen » réduit certains facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires. Toutefois, d'autres essais sont nécessaires pour examiner les effets des différents participants recrutés et des différentes interventions diététiques pour déterminer quelles interventions pourraient être les plus efficaces auprès des différentes populations.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.