Intervention Review

Steroidal contraceptives and bone fractures in women: evidence from observational studies

  1. Laureen M Lopez1,*,
  2. Mario Chen2,
  3. Sarah Mullins1,
  4. Kathryn M. Curtis3,
  5. Frans M Helmerhorst4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Fertility Regulation Group

Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009849.pub2


How to Cite

Lopez LM, Chen M, Mullins S, Curtis KM, Helmerhorst FM. Steroidal contraceptives and bone fractures in women: evidence from observational studies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD009849. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009849.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    FHI 360, Clinical Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  2. 2

    FHI 360, Division of Biostatistics, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  3. 3

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Reproductive Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  4. 4

    Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Gynaecology, Division of Reproductive Medicine and Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden, Netherlands

*Laureen M Lopez, Clinical Sciences, FHI 360, P.O. Box 13950, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA. llopez@fhi360.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Age-related decline in bone mass increases the risk of skeletal fractures, especially those of the hip, spine, and wrist. Steroidal contraceptives have been associated with changes in bone mineral density in women. Whether such changes affect the risk of fractures later in life is unclear. Hormonal contraceptives are among the most effective and most widely-used contraceptives. Concern about fractures may limit the use of these effective contraceptives. Observational studies can collect data on premenopausal contraceptive use as well as fracture incidence later in life.

Objectives

We systematically reviewed the evidence from observational studies of hormonal contraceptive use for contraception and the risk of fracture in women.

Search methods

In May 2012, we searched for observational studies. The databases included MEDLINE, POPLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science. We also searched for recent clinical trials through ClinicalTrials.gov and the ICTRP. For other studies, we examined reference lists of relevant articles and wrote to investigators for additional reports.

Selection criteria

We included cohort and case-control studies of hormonal contraceptive use. Interventions included comparisons of a hormonal contraceptive with a nonhormonal contraceptive, no contraceptive, or another hormonal contraceptive. The primary outcome was the risk of fracture.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently extracted the data. One author entered the data into RevMan, and a second author verified accuracy. We examined the quality of evidence using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS), developed for case-control and cohort studies. Sensitivity analysis included studies of moderate or high quality based on our assessment with the NOS.

Given the need to control for confounding factors in observational studies, we used adjusted estimates from the models as reported by the authors. Where we did not have adjusted analyses, we calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Due to varied study designs, we did not conduct meta-analysis.

Main results

We included 14 studies (7 case-control and 7 cohort studies). These examined oral contraceptives (OCs) (N=12), depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) (N=4), and the hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) (N=1). This section focuses on evidence from the six studies with moderate or high quality evidence that we included in the sensitivity analysis.

All six studies examined oral contraceptive use. We noted few associations with fracture risk. One cohort study found OC ever-users had increased risk for all fractures (reported RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.34). However, a case-control study with later data from a subset reported no association except for those with 10 years or more since use (reported OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.33). Another case-control study reported increased risk only for those who had 10 or more prescriptions (reported OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.16). A cohort study of postmenopausal women found no increased fracture risk for OC use after excluding women with prior fracture. Two other studies found little evidence of association between OC use and fracture risk. A cohort study noted increased risk for subgroups, such as those with longer use or specific intervals since use. A case-control study reported increased risk for any fracture only among young women with less than average use.

Two case-control studies in the sensitivity analysis also examined progestin-only contraceptives. One reported increased fracture risk for DMPA ever-use (reported OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.06), more than four years of use (reported OR 2.16; 95% CI 1.32 to 3.53), and women over 50 years old. The other noted increased risk for any past use, including one or two prescriptions (reported OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.29), and for current use of 3 to 9 or 10 or more prescriptions. In addition, one study reported reduced fracture risk for ever-use of the hormonal IUD (reported OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.87) and longer use of that IUD.

Authors' conclusions

Observational studies do not indicate an overall association between OC use and fracture risk. Some reported increased risk for specific user subgroups. DMPA users may have an increased fracture risk. One study indicated hormonal IUD use may be associated with decreased risk. Observational studies need adjusted analysis because the comparison groups usually differ. Researchers should be clear about the variables examined in multivariate analysis.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Hormonal birth control and fracture risk in observational studies

When bone mass declines with age, the risk of fractures increases. Birth control methods that have hormones may lead to changes in women’s bone density. Worry about fractures may limit the use of these effective methods. Observational studies can collect data on birth control use as well as fractures later in life. In May 2012, we searched for such studies in several databases. 

We included studies that looked at hormonal birth control use and fracture risk. We examined the quality of research methods using a tool for observational studies. With these types of studies, researchers need to control for differences in the study groups. We used the results from adjusted analyses as reported. Where we did not have adjusted analysis, we used the odds ratio to look at differences between groups.

We found 14 studies. Six of them had good quality results and looked at use of birth control pills. We did not find an overall difference in fracture risk for users and nonusers of birth control pills. One study found pill users were more likely to have fractures overall. Another had later data for a subset of those women. Pill use was not related to fracture risk except for 10 years or more since use. Still another study showed more risk when the woman had 10 or more prescriptions. When a study of postmenopausal women removed the women with prior fracture, pill users did not have higher fracture risk. Two more studies saw more fractures in pill users but only for certain user subgroups.

Two studies looked at birth control methods that contain only the hormone progestin. They both found that users of the injected ‘depo’ (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) had more fractures, as did women with longer current use. One showed more fractures for women with any past 'depo' use. Another study showed that women who had used the hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) were less likely to have a fracture.

These studies did not show that birth control pills are generally related to more fractures. Some studies reported greater risk for subgroups. Users of ‘depo’ may have more fracture risk. Observational studies need to examine differences between study groups. Researchers should be clear about the factors studied in the analysis.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs stéroïdiens et fractures osseuses chez les femmes : données issues d'études observationnelles

Contexte

La diminution de la masse osseuse liée à l'âge accroit le risque de fractures osseuses, en particulier celles de la hanche, de la colonne vertébrale et du poignet. Les contraceptifs stéroïdiens ont été associés à des changements dans la densité minérale osseuse des femmes. On ne sait pas si de tels changements influencent le risque de fractures à un stade ultérieur de la vie. Les contraceptifs hormonaux sont parmi les contraceptifs les plus efficaces et les plus largement utilisés. Des inquiétudes quant à d'éventuelles fractures pourraient limiter l'utilisation de ces contraceptifs efficaces. Les études observationnelles peuvent collecter des données sur l'utilisation de la contraception préménopause ainsi que sur l'incidence des fractures à un stade ultérieur de la vie.

Objectifs

Nous avons systématiquement examiné les données issues d'études observationnelles sur l'utilisation de contraceptifs hormonaux et le risque de fracture chez les femmes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En mai 2012 nous avons recherché des études observationnelles. Il s'agissait notamment des bases de données MEDLINE, POPLINE, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), LILACS, EMBASE, CINAHL et Web of Science. Nous avons également recherché des essais cliniques récents dans ClinicalTrials.gov et l'ICTRP. Pour trouver d'autres études, nous avons examiné les références bibliographiques d'articles pertinents et écrit à des chercheurs pour obtenir des rapports supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des études de cohorte et des études cas-témoins sur l'utilisation de contraceptifs hormonaux. Les interventions comprenaient des comparaisons d'un contraceptif hormonal avec un contraceptif non hormonal, l'absence de contraception ou un autre contraceptif hormonal. Le critère de jugement principal était le risque de fracture.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment extrait les données. Un auteur a saisi les données dans RevMan et un deuxième auteur en a vérifié l'exactitude. Nous avons examiné la qualité des données à l'aide de l'échelle Newcastle-Ottawa d'évaluation de la qualité (NOS), développée pour les études cas-témoins et de cohorte. L'analyse de sensibilité incluait des études de qualité modérée ou élevée sur la base de notre évaluation avec la NOS.

Compte tenu de la nécessité de neutraliser les facteurs de confusion dans les études observationnelles, nous avons utilisé des estimations ajustées à l'aide des modèles signalés par les auteurs. Lorsque nous n'avions pas d'analyses ajustées, nous avons calculé le rapport de cotes (RC) avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %. En raison de la variété des conceptions d'études, nous n'avons pas effectué de méta-analyse.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 14 études (7 études cas-témoins et 7 études de cohorte). Celles-ci avaient porté sur les contraceptifs oraux (CO) (N = 12), l'acétate de médroxyprogestérone retard (AMPR) (N = 4) et le stérilet hormonal (N = 1). Cette section se concentre sur les résultats des six études aux données de qualité moyenne ou élevée que nous avons incluses dans l'analyse de sensibilité.

Les six études avaient porté sur l'utilisation de contraceptifs oraux. Nous avons noté quelques associations avec le risque de fracture. Une étude de cohorte avait constaté que les utilisatrices de CO depuis toujours avaient un risque accru pour toutes les fractures (RR rapporté 1,20 ; IC à 95 % 1,08 à 1,34). Toutefois, une étude cas-témoins avec des données ultérieures d'un sous-ensemble n'avait pas rendu compte d'une association, sauf pour celles se trouvant 10 ans au moins après l'utilisation (RC rapporté 1,55 ; IC à 95 % 1,03 à 2,33). Une autre étude cas-témoin n'avait fait état d'un risque accru que pour celles qui avaient eu 10 prescriptions ou plus (RC rapporté 1,09 ; IC à 95 % 1,3 à 1,16). Une étude de cohorte sur des femmes ménopausées n'avait trouvé aucun risque accru de fractures lié à l'utilisation de CO, après exclusion des femmes avec antécédent de fracture. Deux autres études avaient trouvé de légères preuves d'une association entre l'utilisation de CO et le risque de fracture. Une étude de cohorte avait remarqué un risque accru pour des sous-groupes tels que celles avec une utilisation plus prolongée ou des intervalles de temps spécifiques depuis l'utilisation. Une étude cas-témoin avait fait état d'un risque accru de fracture en tous genres pour les seules jeunes femmes qui avaient eu une utilisation inférieure à la moyenne.

Deux études cas-témoins dans l'analyse de sensibilité avaient également examiné les contraceptifs à seuls progestatifs. Une avait rapporté un risque accru de fracture pour l'utilisation d'AMPR depuis toujours (RC rapporté 1,44 ; IC à 95 % 1,01 à 2,06), plus de quatre ans d'utilisation (RC rapporté 2,16 ; IC à 95 % 1,32 à 3,53) et les femmes de plus de 50 ans. L'autre avait noté un risque accru pour toute utilisation antérieure, y compris une ou deux prescriptions (RC rapporté 1,17 ; IC à 95 % 1,07 à 1,29), et pour une utilisation courante de 3 à 9 ou 10 prescriptions ou plus. En outre, une étude avait fait état d'un risque réduit de fracture pour l'utilisation depuis toujours du stérilet hormonal (RC rapporté 0,75 ; IC à 95 % 0,64 à 0,87) et une plus longue utilisation de ce stérilet.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les études observationnelles n'indiquent pas une association globale entre l'utilisation de CO et le risque de fracture. Certaines avaient fait état d'un risque accru pour des sous-groupes spécifiques d'utilisatrices. Les utilisatrices d'AMPR pourraient avoir un risque accru de fracture. Une étude avait indiqué que l'utilisation du stérilet hormonal pourrait être associée à un risque diminué. Les études observationnelles nécessitent une analyse ajustée parce qu'en général les groupes de comparaison diffèrent. Les chercheurs devraient être clairs quant aux variables examinées dans l'analyse multifactorielle.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Contraceptifs stéroïdiens et fractures osseuses chez les femmes : données issues d'études observationnelles

Contraception hormonale et risque de fracture dans les études observationnelles

Lorsque, avec l'âge, la masse osseuse décroit, le risque de fractures augmente. Les méthodes de contraception hormonales pourraient avoir entrainé des changements au niveau de la densité osseuse des femmes. Des inquiétudes quant à d'éventuelles fractures pourraient limiter l'utilisation de ces méthodes efficaces. Les études observationnelles peuvent collecter des données sur l'utilisation de la contraception ainsi que sur les fractures survenant à un stade ultérieur de la vie. En mai 2012 nous avons recherché de telles études dans plusieurs bases de données.

Nous avons inclus les études qui s'étaient intéressées à l'utilisation de la contraception hormonale et au risque de fracture. Nous avons examiné la qualité des méthodes de recherche au moyen d'un outil pour études observationnelles. Avec ces types d'études, les chercheurs doivent neutraliser les différences entre les groupes d'étude. Nous avons utilisé les résultats des analyses ajustées dont il avait été rendu compte. Lorsque nous n'avions pas d'analyses ajustées, nous avons utilisé le rapport de cotes pour examiner les différences entre les groupes.

Nous avons trouvé 14 études. Six d'entre elles avaient des résultats de bonne qualité et s'étaient intéressées à l'utilisation de pilules contraceptives. Nous n'avons pas constaté de différence globale pour le risque de fracture entre les utilisatrices et les non-utilisatrices de pilules contraceptives. Une étude avait trouvé que les utilisatrices de pilules étaient globalement plus susceptibles de subir des fractures. Un autre avait des données ultérieures pour un sous-ensemble de ces femmes. L'utilisation de la pilule n'était pas liée au risque de fracture si ce n'est pour 10 ans ou plus après utilisation. Une autre étude encore avait observé un risque accru lorsque la femme avait eu 10 prescriptions ou plus. Quand une étude sur des femmes ménopausées avait retiré les femmes ayant un antécédent de fracture, les utilisatrices de la pilule n'avaient pas un risque plus élevé de fracture. Deux autres études avaient constaté plus de fractures chez les utilisatrices de la pilule, mais seulement pour certains sous-groupes d'utilisatrices.

Deux études avaient porté sur les méthodes de contraception n'utilisant que l'hormone progestative. Elles avaient toutes deux constaté que les utilisatrices de la ‘depo’ (acétate de médroxyprogestérone retard) par injection avaient plus de fractures, de même que les femmes l'utilisant depuis plus longtemps. Une avait constaté plus de fractures chez les femmes ayant utilisé la 'depo' dans le passé. Une autre étude avait montré que les femmes qui avaient utilisé un stérilet hormonal étaient moins susceptibles d'avoir une fracture.

Ces études n'avaient pas montré que les pilules contraceptives sont généralement liées à davantage de fractures. Certaines études avaient fait état de risques accrus pour des sous-groupes. Les utilisatrices de la ‘depo’ pourraient avoir un plus grand risque de fracture. Les études observationnelles doivent examiner les différences entre les groupes d'étude. Les chercheurs devraient être clairs quant aux facteurs étudiés dans l'analyse.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 13th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français