Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Slow-release oral morphine as maintenance therapy for opioid dependence

  1. Marica Ferri1,*,
  2. Silvia Minozzi2,
  3. Alessandra Bo1,
  4. Laura Amato2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group

Published Online: 5 JUN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009879.pub2

How to Cite

Ferri M, Minozzi S, Bo A, Amato L. Slow-release oral morphine as maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD009879. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009879.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, Interventions, Best Practice and Scientific Partners, Lisbon, Portugal

  2. 2

    Lazio Regional Health Service, Department of Epidemiology, Rome, Italy

*Marica Ferri, Interventions, Best Practice and Scientific Partners, European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, Cais do Sodre' 1249-289 Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. marica.ferri@emcdda.europa.eu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 5 JUN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Opioid substitution treatments are effective in retaining people in treatment and suppressing heroin use. An open question remains whether slow-release oral morphine (SROM) could represent a possible alternative for opioid-dependent people who respond poorly to other available maintenance treatments.

Objectives

To evaluate the efficacy of SROM as an alternative maintenance pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence.

Search methods

We searched Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group's Register of Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL - The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2013), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2013) and reference lists of articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials assessing efficacy of SROM compared with other maintenance treatment or no treatment.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected articles for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies.

Main results

Three studies with 195 participants were included in the review. Two were cross-over trials and one was a parallel group RCT. The retention in treatment appeared superior to 80% in all the three studies (without significant difference with controls). Nevertheless, it has to be underlined that the studies had different durations. One lasted six months, and the other two lasted six and seven weeks. The use of opioids during SROM provision varied from lower to non-statistically or clinically different from comparison interventions, whereas there were no differences as far as the use of other substances was concerned.

SROM seemed to be equal to comparison interventions for severity of dependence, or mental health/social functioning, but there was a trend for less severe opiate withdrawal symptoms in comparison with methadone (withdrawal score 2.2 vs. 4.8, P value = 0.06). Morphine was generally well tolerated and was preferred by a proportion of participants (seven of nine people in one study). Morphine appeared to reduce cravings, depressive symptoms (measured using the Beck Depression Inventory; P value < 0.001), physical complaints (measured using the Beschwerde-Liste (BL); P value < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (P value = 0.008). Quality of life in people treated with SROM resulted in no significant difference or a worst outcome than in those taking methadone and buprenorphine. Other social functioning measures, such as finances, family and overall satisfaction, scored better in people maintained with the comparison substances than in those maintained with SROM. In particular, people taking methadone showed more favourable values for leisure time (5.4 vs. 3.7, P value < 0.001), housing (6.1 vs. 4.7, P value < 0.023), partnerships (5.7 vs. 4.2, P value = 0.034), friend and acquaintances (5.6 vs. 4.4, P value = 0.003), mental health (5.0 vs. 3.4, P value = 0.002) and self esteem (8.2 vs. 5.7, P value = 0.002) compared to people taking SROM; while people taking buprenorphine obtained better scores for physical health.

Medical adverse events were consistently higher in people in SROM than in the comparison groups. None of the studies included people with a documented poor response to other maintenance treatment.

Authors' conclusions

The present review did not identify sufficient evidence to assess the effectiveness of SROM for opioid maintenance because only three studies meeting our inclusion criteria have been identified. Two studies suggested a possible reduction of opioid use in people taking SROM. In another study, the use of SROM was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Retention in treatment was not significantly different among compared interventions while the adverse effects were more frequent with the people given SROM.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Use of slow-release oral morphine for the treatment of people with opioid dependence

Opioid dependence is associated with public health and social problems. People injecting opioids are particularly at risk, not only because they become dependent faster than with other routes of administration but also because they are exposed to consequences such as an increased risk of overdose mortality, infective diseases and health issues. At least three-quarters of global opiate users consume heroin.

Opioid substitution treatment involves prescribing an opioid to replace street heroin or other opioids. This is a long-term treatment that has been shown to reduce injecting of street heroin and the risk of death and blood-borne virus transmission, and to reduce involvement in crime.

Maintenance treatments that are effective in retaining people in treatment and suppressing heroin use include methadone, buprenorphine, and dyacethilmorphine, alone or combined with psychosocial treatments. In order to diversify the treatment possibilities, it is important to clarify the benefits that each specific intervention can bring to patients. Slow release oral morphine (SROM) is given once daily and has been proposed for people who cannot tolerate methadone or who respond poorly to other available maintenance treatments.

This review did not identify sufficient evidence to assess the effectiveness of SROM for opioid maintenance. Only three randomised controlled trials involving 195 participants met our inclusion criteria. The findings of two studies suggested a possible reduction of opioid use in people taking SROM. In another study, the use of SROM was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Retention in treatment was not clearly different among the compared interventions. Adverse effects were more frequent with SROM than buprenorphine or methadone, including stomach cramps, headache, toothache, constipation, vomiting and insomnia.

These studies had small numbers of participants, very short follow -up and were designed to answer different questions. Overall, the quality of the evidence can be judged as low.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Morphine orale à libération prolongée comme traitement d'entretien dans la dépendance aux opiacés

Contexte

Les traitements de substitution aux opiacés permettent aux patients de poursuivre leur traitement et de ne plus consommer d'héroïne. Une question ouverte demeure, à savoir si la morphine orale à libération prolongée (SROM) peut constituer une éventuelle alternative pour les personnes dépendantes aux opiacés qui répondent mal aux autres traitements d'entretien disponibles.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de la SROM en tant que pharmacothérapie d'entretien alternative pour le traitement de la dépendance aux opiacés.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais du groupe Cochrane sur les drogues et l'alcool, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL - The Cochrane Library numéro 3, 2013), MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à avril 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à avril 2013) et les listes bibliographiques des articles.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et quasi randomisés comparant l'efficacité de la SROM à un autre traitement d'entretien ou à l'absence de traitement.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné des articles en vue de leur inclusion, extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais des études incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Trois études totalisant 195 participants ont été incluses dans la revue. Deux étaient des essais croisés et une était un ECR en groupes parallèles. Le maintien du traitement semblait dépasser les 80 % dans l'ensemble des trois études (sans différence significative avec les groupes témoins). Néanmoins, il doit être précisé que les études étaient de durées différentes. L'une s'étendait sur six mois et les deux autres sur six et sept semaines. La consommation d'opiacés lors de l'administration de SROM était inférieure à non statistiquement ou cliniquement différente des interventions témoins, alors qu'il n'y avait aucune différence au niveau de la consommation d'autres substances.

La SROM semblait équivalente aux interventions témoins en termes de gravité de la dépendance ou du fonctionnement social/santé mentale, mais les symptômes graves de sevrage des opiacés avaient tendance à diminuer par rapport à la méthadone (score de sevrage 2,2 contre 4,8, valeur de P = 0,06). La morphine était généralement bien tolérée et préférée par une proportion de participants (sept personnes sur neuf dans une étude). Elle semblait réduire les manques, les symptômes dépressifs (mesurés à l'aide de l'inventaire de dépression de Beck ; valeur de P < 0,001), les problèmes physiques (mesurés à l'aide de la liste de l'échelle Beschwerde-Liste (BL) ; valeur de P < 0,001) et les symptômes d'anxiété (valeur de P = 0,008). La qualité de vie des personnes traitées par SROM n'était pas significativement différente ou avait empiré par rapport aux personnes sous méthadone et buprénorphine. D'autres mesures de la fonction sociale, comme les finances, la famille et la satisfaction globale, étaient meilleures chez les personnes continuant leur traitement avec des substances témoins par rapport à celles qui continuaient de prendre de la SROM. Plus particulièrement, les personnes sous méthadone montraient des valeurs plus favorables pour les loisirs (5,4 contre 3,7, valeur de P < 0,001), le logement (6,1 contre 4,7, valeur de P < 0,023), les partenariats (5,7 contre 4,2, valeur de P = 0,034), les relations amicales et les connaissances (5,6 contre 4,4, valeur de P = 0,003), la santé mentale (5,0 contre 3,4, valeur de P = 0,002) et l'estime de soi (8,2 contre 5,7, valeur de P = 0,002) par rapport aux personnes sous SROM ; alors que celles sous buprénorphine obtenaient de meilleures scores en termes de santé physique.

Les événements indésirables médicaux étaient nettement plus nombreux chez les personnes sous SROM que dans les groupes témoins. Aucune des études n'incluait des personnes présentant une faible réponse documentée à un autre traitement d'entretien.

Conclusions des auteurs

La présente revue n'a pas identifié de preuves suffisantes pour évaluer l'efficacité de la SROM dans un traitement d'entretien aux opiacés car seules trois études répondant à nos critères d'inclusion ont été identifiées. Deux études suggéraient une éventuelle diminution de la consommation d'opiacés chez les personnes sous SROM. Dans une autre étude, l'administration de SROM était liée à une baisse des symptômes dépressifs. Le maintien du traitement n'était pas significativement différent parmi les interventions comparées, alors que ses effets indésirables étaient plus fréquents chez les personnes sous SROM.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Morphine orale à libération prolongée comme traitement d'entretien dans la dépendance aux opiacés

Administration de morphine orale à libération prolongée pour le traitement de personnes dépendantes aux opiacés

La dépendance aux opiacés est liée à des problèmes sociaux et de santé publique. Les personnes s'injectant des opiacés sont particulièrement à risque, non seulement parce qu'elles deviennent dépendantes plus rapidement par rapport à d'autres voies d'administration, mais aussi parce qu'elles sont exposées à des conséquences comme des risques accrus de mortalité par overdose, des maladies infectieuses et des problèmes de santé. Au moins les trois quarts des consommateurs d'opiacés dans le monde consomment de l'héroïne.

Un traitement de substitution aux opiacés consiste à prescrire un opiacé pour remplacer l'héroïne illicite ou d'autres opiacés. Il s'agit d'un traitement à long terme qui réduit l'injection d'héroïne illicite, les risques de décès, la transmission de virus par le sang et la criminalité.

Les traitements d'entretien qui incitent les patients à continuer leur traitement et à cesser toute consommation d'héroïne contiennent de la méthadone, de la buprénorphine et de la diacéthilmorphine, seules ou associées à des traitements psychosociaux. Afin de diversifier les possibilités de traitement, il est important de clarifier les effets bénéfiques que chaque intervention spécifique peut apporter aux patients. La morphine orale à libération prolongée (SROM pour « Slow Release Oral Morphine ») est administrée une fois par jour et proposée aux patients qui ne tolèrent pas la méthadone ou qui réagissent mal aux autres traitements d'entretien disponibles.

La présente revue n'a identifié aucune preuve suffisamment probante pour évaluer l'efficacité de la SROM dans un traitement d'entretien aux opiacés. Seuls trois essais contrôlés randomisés impliquant 195 participants répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Les résultats de deux études suggéraient une éventuelle diminution de la consommation d'opiacés chez les personnes sous SROM. Dans une autre étude, l'administration de SROM était liée à une baisse des symptômes dépressifs. Le maintien du traitement n'était pas clairement différent parmi les interventions comparées. Des effets indésirables étaient plus fréquents avec la SROM par rapport à la buprénorphine ou à la méthadone, notamment des crampes d'estomac, des céphalées, des douleurs dentaires, des constipations, des vomissements et des insomnies.

Ces études se composaient d'un nombre réduit de participants, d'un suivi très court et étaient conçues de sorte à répondre à différentes questions. Dans l'ensemble, la qualité des preuves peut être considérée comme étant médiocre.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.