Intervention Review

Exercise and mobilisation interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome

  1. Matthew J Page1,*,
  2. Denise O'Connor1,
  3. Veronica Pitt2,
  4. Nicola Massy-Westropp3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 13 JUN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009899


How to Cite

Page MJ, O'Connor D, Pitt V, Massy-Westropp N. Exercise and mobilisation interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD009899. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009899.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Monash University, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  2. 2

    National Trauma Research Institute, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    University of South Australia, Health Sciences, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

*Matthew J Page, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, The Alfred Centre, 99 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia. matthew.page@monash.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 13 JUN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Non-surgical treatment, including exercises and mobilisation, has been offered to people experiencing mild to moderate symptoms arising from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, the effectiveness and duration of benefit from exercises and mobilisation for this condition remain unknown.

Objectives

To review the efficacy and safety of exercise and mobilisation interventions compared with no treatment, a placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialised Register (10 January 2012), CENTRAL (2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), CINAHL Plus (January 1937 to January 2012), and AMED (January 1985 to January 2012).

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing exercise or mobilisation interventions with no treatment, placebo or another non-surgical intervention in people with CTS.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed searches and selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of the included studies. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for primary and secondary outcomes of the review. We collected data on adverse events from included studies.

Main results

Sixteen studies randomising 741 participants with CTS were included in the review. Two compared a mobilisation regimen to a no treatment control, three compared one mobilisation intervention (for example carpal bone mobilisation) to another (for example soft tissue mobilisation), nine compared nerve mobilisation delivered as part of a multi-component intervention to another non-surgical intervention (for example splint or therapeutic ultrasound), and three compared a mobilisation intervention other than nerve mobilisation (for example yoga or chiropractic treatment) to another non-surgical intervention. The risk of bias of the included studies was low in some studies and unclear or high in other studies, with only three explicitly reporting that the allocation sequence was concealed, and four reporting blinding of participants. The studies were heterogeneous in terms of the interventions delivered, outcomes measured and timing of outcome assessment, therefore, we were unable to pool results across studies. Only four studies reported the primary outcome of interest, short-term overall improvement (any measure in which patients indicate the intensity of their complaints compared to baseline, for example, global rating of improvement, satisfaction with treatment, within three months post-treatment). However, of these, only three fully reported outcome data sufficient for inclusion in the review. One very low quality trial with 14 participants found that all participants receiving either neurodynamic mobilisation or carpal bone mobilisation and none in the no treatment group reported overall improvement (RR 15.00, 95% CI 1.02 to 220.92), though the precision of this effect estimate is very low. One low quality trial with 22 participants found that the chance of being 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with treatment was 24% higher for participants receiving instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilisation compared to standard soft tissue mobilisation (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.75), though participants were not blinded and it was unclear if the allocation sequence was concealed. Another very low-quality trial with 26 participants found that more CTS-affected wrists receiving nerve gliding exercises plus splint plus activity modification had no pathologic finding on median and ulnar nerve distal sensory latency assessment at the end of treatment than wrists receiving splint plus activity modification alone (RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.69 to 2.30). However, a unit of analysis error occurred in this trial, as the correlation between wrists in participants with bilateral CTS was not accounted for. Only two studies measured adverse effects, so more data are required before any firm conclusions on the safety of exercise and mobilisation interventions can be made. In general, the results of secondary outcomes of the review (short- and long-term improvement in CTS symptoms, functional ability, health-related quality of life, neurophysiologic parameters, and the need for surgery) for most comparisons had 95% CIs which incorporated effects in either direction.

Authors' conclusions

There is limited and very low quality evidence of benefit for all of a diverse collection of exercise and mobilisation interventions for CTS. People with CTS who indicate a preference for exercise or mobilisation interventions should be informed of the limited evidence of effectiveness and safety of this intervention by their treatment provider. Until more high quality randomised controlled trials assessing the effectiveness and safety of various exercise and mobilisation interventions compared to other non-surgical interventions are undertaken, the decision to provide this type of non-surgical intervention to people with CTS should be based on the clinician's expertise in being able to deliver these treatments and patient's preferences.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Exercise and mobilisation interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition where one of two main nerves in the wrist is compressed, resulting in pain to the hand, wrist and sometimes arm, numbness and tingling in the thumb, index and long finger. In advanced cases the muscles of the hand can become weak. The condition affects approximately three per cent of the population, more commonly women. While carpal tunnel syndrome can be treated with surgery, people with mild to moderate symptoms are sometimes offered non-surgical interventions such as exercises or mobilisation. Based on the 16 studies identified, there is limited and very low quality evidence of benefit for all of a diverse collection of exercise and mobilisation interventions for improving symptoms, functional ability (for example hand grip strength), quality of life, and neurophysiologic parameters, and for minimising adverse effects and the need for surgery in people with carpal tunnel syndrome. More research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of exercises and mobilisation for people with carpal tunnel syndrome, especially the sustainability and long-term effects of this treatment.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation pour le syndrome du canal carpien

Contexte

Un traitement non-chirurgical, incluant des exercices et une mobilisation, est parfois proposé aux personnes confrontées à des symptômes légers à modérés provoqués par le syndrome du canal carpien (SCC). Cependant, l'effet et la durée du bénéfice des exercices et de la mobilisation pour ce syndrome restent à déterminer.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité des interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation en comparaison avec l'absence de traitement, un placebo ou une autre intervention non-chirurgicale, chez les personnes atteintes du SCC.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les affections neuromusculaires (10 janvier 2012), CENTRAL (2011, numéro 4), MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à décembre 2011), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à janvier 2012), CINAHL Plus (de janvier 1937 à janvier 2012), et AMED (de janvier 1985 à janvier 2012).

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés comparant des interventions d'exercices ou de mobilisation à l'absence de traitement, un placebo ou une autre intervention non-chirurgicale, chez les personnes atteintes du SCC.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué les recherches et sélectionné les essais à inclure, extrait les données et évalué les risques de biais des études incluses, de manière indépendante. Nous avons calculé les risques relatifs (RR) et les différences moyennes (DM) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour les critères de jugement principaux et secondaires. Nous avons recueilli les informations sur les événements indésirables dans les études incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Seize études randomisant 741 participants atteints du SCC ont été incluses dans cette revue. Deux ont comparé un traitement par mobilisation à l'absence de traitement comme témoin, trois ont comparé une intervention de mobilisation (par exemple mobilisation du carpe) à une autre (par exemple mobilisation des tissus mous), neuf ont comparé la mobilisation des nerfs menée dans le cadre d'une intervention à composantes multiples à une autre intervention non-chirurgicale (par exemple attelles ou ultrasonothérapie), et trois ont comparé une intervention de mobilisation autre que la mobilisation des nerfs (par exemple yoga ou chiropractie) à une autre intervention non-chirurgicale. Le risque de biais était faible dans certaines études et incertain ou élevé dans d'autres études : trois seulement indiquaient explicitement que la séquence d'assignation avait été gardée secrète et quatre signalaient une mise en aveugle des participants. Les études étaient hétérogènes en ce qui concerne les interventions menées, les critères mesurés et la planification de l'évaluation des critères, par conséquent, nous n'avons pas été en mesure de combiner les résultats des études. Seules quatre études avaient rendu compte du principal critère de jugement intéressant, l'amélioration globale à court terme (toute mesure par laquelle les patients indiquent l'intensité de leurs symptômes par rapport à un état initial, par exemple un score global d'amélioration ou de satisfaction avec un traitement, dans les trois mois suivant le traitement). Toutefois, parmi celles-ci, seules trois avaient rendu compte de données de critères complètes suffisantes pour être incluses dans la revue. Un essai de très faible qualité incluant 14 participants a trouvé que tous les participants ayant bénéficié soit d'une mobilisation neurodynamique soit d'une mobilisation du carpe, avaient rapporté une amélioration globale (RR 15,00 ; IC à 95 % 1,02 à 220,92), même si la précision de l'estimation de cet effet est très faible, et n'en a trouvé aucun dans le groupe témoin, à savoir l'absence de traitement. Un essai de faible qualité incluant 22 participants a trouvé que les participants ayant bénéficié d'une mobilisation des tissus mous assistée par un instrument comparée à une mobilisation des tissus mous standard, avaient 24 % de chances en plus d'être 'satisfaits' ou 'très satisfaits' du traitement (RR 1,24 ; IC à 95 % 0,89 à 1,75), même si les participants n'avaient pas été mis en aveugle et même s'il n'était pas certain que la séquence d'assignation avait été gardée secrète. Un autre essai de très faible qualité incluant 26 participants a trouvé qu'un plus grand nombre de poignets atteints du SCC bénéficiant d'exercices de glissement des nerfs plus des attelles plus une modification d'activité ne présentaient aucune conséquence pathologique lors de l'évaluation de la latence sensorielle distale des nerfs médian et cubital à la fin du traitement, comparés aux poignets traités par des attelles plus une modification d'activité seulement (RR 1,26 ; IC 95 % 0,69 à 2,30). Toutefois, il s'est produit une erreur dans l’unité d’analyse dans cet essai, car la corrélation entre les poignets chez les participants atteints du SCC bilatéral n'avait pas été prise en compte. Seules deux études avait mesuré les effets indésirables, davantage de données sont donc nécessaires avant que l'on puisse tirer des conclusions définitives sur l'innocuité des interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation. En général, les résultats des critères secondaires de la revue (amélioration à court et long terme des symptômes du SCC, capacité fonctionnelle, qualité de vie liée à la santé, paramètres neurophysiologiques et nécessité d'une intervention chirurgicale) pour la plupart des comparaisons avaient un IC à 95 % qui intégrait les effets dans les deux sens.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves sont limitées et de très faible qualité quant au bénéfice apporté par toute une collection variée d'interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation dans le SCC. Les personnes atteintes du SCC qui indiquent une préférence pour des interventions d'exercices ou de mobilisation doivent être informées des preuves limitées de l'innocuité et de la sécurité de cette intervention par leurs prestataires de soins. Jusqu'à ce que d'autres essais contrôlés randomisés de grande qualité évaluant l'efficacité et l'innocuité des différentes interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation comparées à d'autres interventions non-chirurgicales soient menés, la décision de dispenser ce type d'intervention non-chirurgicale aux personnes atteintes du SCC doit être fondée sur l'expertise des cliniciens dans la prise en charge de ces prestations de soins ainsi que sur les préférences du patient.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation pour le syndrome du canal carpien

Interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation pour le syndrome du canal carpien

Le syndrome du canal carpien est une pathologie courante dans laquelle un des deux principaux nerfs passant dans le poignet est comprimé, entrainant une douleur dans la main, le poignet et parfois le bras, un engourdissement et des picotements dans le pouce, l'index et le majeur. Dans les cas avancés les muscles de la main peuvent s'affaiblir. Ce syndrome affecte environ trois pour cent de la population, des femmes le plus souvent. Tandis que le syndrome du canal carpien peut être traité par chirurgie, les personnes confrontées à des symptômes légers à modérés sont parfois invitées à bénéficier d'interventions non-chirurgicales telles que des exercices ou une mobilisation. D'après les 16 études identifiées, les preuves sont limitées et de très faible qualité quant au bénéfice apporté par toute une collection variée d'interventions d'exercices et de mobilisation pour améliorer les symptômes, la capacité fonctionnelle (par exemple la force de préhension de la main), la qualité de vie et les paramètres neurophysiologiques, et pour réduire nettement les effets indésirables et la nécessité d'une intervention chirurgicale chez les personnes atteintes du syndrome du canal carpien (SCC). Davantage de recherches doivent être effectuées pour étudier l'efficacité des exercices et de la mobilisation chez les personnes atteintes du syndrome du canal carpien, en particulier la durabilité et les effets à long terme de ce traitement.

Notes de traduction

Ceci est l'une des six nouvelles revues qui vont actualiser la revue déjà publiée 'Non-surgical treatment (other than steroid injection) for carpal tunnel syndrome' (« Traitement non-chirurgical (autre que l'injection de stéroïdes) pour le syndrome du canal carpien »). Lorsque les six revues auront été publiées nous retirerons la revue initiale de la publication. Cette revue comprend une nouvelle recherche, une question de départ et des critères de sélection révisés, une méthodologie mise à jour et une équipe de revue renouvelée.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 25th June, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français