Intervention Review

Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin

  1. Kamal R Mahtani1,*,
  2. Carl J Heneghan1,
  3. David Nunan1,
  4. Nia W Roberts2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Heart Group

Published Online: 15 MAY 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 27 FEB 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009917.pub2


How to Cite

Mahtani KR, Heneghan CJ, Nunan D, Roberts NW. Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD009917. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009917.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  2. 2

    University of Oxford, Bodleian Health Care Libraries, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

*Kamal R Mahtani, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, New Radcliffe House, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX2 6GG, UK. kamal.mahtani@phc.ox.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 MAY 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Effective use of warfarin involves keeping the international normalised ratio (INR) within a relatively narrow therapeutic range. However, patients respond widely to their dose of warfarin. Overcoagulation can lead to an increased risk of excessive bleeding, while undercoagulation can lead to increased clot formation. There is some evidence that patients with a variable response to warfarin may benefit from a concomitant low dose of vitamin K.

Objectives

To assess the effects of concomitant supplementation of low-dose oral vitamin K for anticoagulation control in patients being initiated on or taking a maintenance dose of warfarin.

Search methods

To identify previous reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2011). To identify primary studies, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations database and Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (1946 to 25 February 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (1974 to week 8 of 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded™ & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science™) (1945 to 27 February 2014), and the NHS Economics Evaluations Database (NHS EED) (via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014). We did not apply any language or date restrictions. We used additional methods to identify grey literature and ongoing studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition of vitamin K versus placebo in patients initiating warfarin or already taking warfarin.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from included studies. When disagreement arose, a third author helped reached a consensus. We also assessed risk of bias.

Main results

We identified two studies with a total of 100 participants for inclusion in the review. We found the overall risk of bias to be unclear in a number of domains. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in range. Only one study (70 participants) reported the mean time in therapeutic range as a percentage. This study found that in the group of participants deemed to have poor INR control, the addition of 150 micrograms (mcg) oral vitamin K significantly improved anticoagulation control in those with unexplained instability of response to warfarin. The second study (30 participants) reported the effect of 175 mcg oral vitamin K versus placebo on participants with high variability in their INR levels. The study concluded that vitamin K supplementation did not significantly improve the stability of anticoagulation for participants on chronic anticoagulation therapy. However, the study was only available in abstract form, and communication with the lead author confirmed that there were no further publications. Therefore, we interpreted this conclusion with caution. Neither study reported any thromboembolic events, haemorrhage, or death from the addition of vitamin K supplementation.

Authors' conclusions

Two included studies in this review compared whether the addition of a low dose (150 to 175 mcg) of vitamin K given to participants with a high-variability response to warfarin improved their INR control. One study demonstrated a significant improvement, while another smaller study (published in abstract only) suggested no overall benefit. Currently, there are insufficient data to suggest an overall benefit. Larger, higher quality trials are needed to examine if low-dose vitamin K improves INR control in those starting or already taking warfarin.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

The addition of vitamin K to improve anticoagulation stability for patients starting or already on warfarin

People with irregularity in heart activity, mechanical heart valves, and clotting disorders are at increased risk of developing blood clots, which could lead to stroke or death. Taking warfarin significantly reduces this risk. However, taking too much warfarin can lead to excessive bleeding, while taking too little reduces its benefit. To monitor this, patients taking warfarin must have regular blood tests to check if their dose of warfarin is stable enough to find the correct balance. There is some evidence that adding a small dose of vitamin K to the warfarin improves this balance. In this review, our primary outcomes were to assess if the addition of low-dose vitamin K to warfarin had an effect on the time taken to the first INR in range; the mean within the therapeutic range; or any adverse events, such as thromboembolic events, haemorrhage, or mortality. We found two studies that met our inclusion criteria. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in range. One study was only available in an abbreviated format, so we were unable to interpret the results fully. Nonetheless, it was suggested that the addition of vitamin K had no benefit. A second six-month study gave a small dose of vitamin K (150 mcg daily) or placebo to participants taking warfarin with existing poor INR control. This study reported the mean time in therapeutic range as a percentage and found that in the group of participants deemed to have poor INR control, the addition of 150 mcg oral vitamin K significantly improved their anticoagulation control. However, the study was relatively small. Neither study reported any adverse events, such as thromboembolism, haemorrhage, or death. We conclude that further larger, higher quality studies are needed to conclude whether adding vitamin K to warfarin for patients starting or already on warfarin improves their anticoagulation control.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La vitamine K pour un meilleur contrôle de l'anticoagulation chez les patients recevant de la warfarine

Contexte

Une utilisation efficace de la warfarine consiste à maintenir le rapport international normalisé (RIN) dans une marge thérapeutique relativement étroite. Cependant, les patients répondent largement à leur dose de warfarine.Une forte coagulation peut conduire à un risque accru de saignements excessifs, tandis qu'une faible coagulation peut entraîner une augmentation de la formation de caillots.Certaines preuves indiquent que les patients avec une réponse variable à la warfarine pourraient bénéficier de l'administration concomitante d'une faible dose de vitamine K.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la supplémentation concomitante par voie orale à faible dose de vitamine K pour le contrôle de l'anticoagulation chez les patients commençant ou prenant une dose d'entretien de warfarine.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Afin d'identifier les revues précédentes, nous avons effectué des recherches dans Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via la Bibliothèque Cochrane, Wiley) (numéro 2, 2011). Pour identifier des études primaires, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL via la Bibliothèque Cochrane, Wiley) (numéro 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) en cours et autres citations non indexées et Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (de 1946 au 25 février 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (de 1974 à la semaine 8 de 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded" & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science") (de 1945 au 27 février 2014) et la base de données d'évaluation économique du NHS (NHS EED) (via la Bibliothèque Cochrane, Wiley) (numéro 2, 2014).Aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date n'a été appliquée. Nous avons utilisé d'autres méthodes pour identifier la littérature grise et les études en cours.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés comparant l'ajout de vitamine K par rapport à un placebo chez les patients qui commencent ou prennent déjà de la warfarine.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné et extrait les données des études incluses. En cas de désaccords, un troisième auteur a aidé à trouver un consensus. Nous avons également évalué les risques de biais.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié deux études portant sur un total de 100 participants pour l'inclusion dans la revue. Le risque global de biais était incertain dans plusieurs domaines. Aucune étude n'a rapporté le temps nécessaire au première RIN en marge. Une seule étude (70 participants) a rapporté le temps moyen de la marge thérapeutique en pourcentage. Cette étude a constaté que dans le groupe de participants jugés avoir un contrôle inadéquat du RIN, l'ajout de 150 microgrammes (mcg) de vitamine K par voie orale améliorait significativement le contrôle de l'anticoagulation chez les patients répondant à la warfarine par une instabilité inexpliquée. La deuxième étude (30 participants) a rapporté l'effet de 175 mcg de vitamine K par voie orale par rapport à un placebo chez des participants avec une variabilité élevée dans leurs niveaux du RIN. L'étude a conclu que la supplémentation en vitamine K n'améliorait pas significativement la stabilité de l'anticoagulation chez les participants sous traitement chronique par anticoagulants.Cependant, l'étude n'était disponible que sous la forme de résumé et une communication avec l'auteur principal a confirmé qu'il n'y avait pas d'autres publications. Par conséquent, nous avons interprété cette conclusion avec prudence.Aucune étude ne rapportait d'événements thromboemboliques, d'hémorragie ou de décès suite à l'ajout de supplémentation en vitamine K.

Conclusions des auteurs

Deux études incluses dans cette revue comparaient si l'ajout d'une dose faible (150 à 175 mcg) de vitamine K administrée aux participants avec une grande variabilité de réponse à la warfarine améliorait le contrôle de leur RIN. Une étude a démontré une amélioration significative, tandis qu'une autre étude plus petite (publiée uniquement sous forme de résumé) ne suggérait aucun bénéfice global.Actuellement, il n'existe pas suffisamment de données permettant de suggérer un bénéfice global. Des essais de plus grande taille et de meilleure qualité sont nécessaires pour examiner si la vitamine K à faible dose améliore le contrôle du RIN chez les patients commençant ou prenant déjà de la warfarine.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La vitamine K pour un meilleur contrôle de l'anticoagulation chez les patients recevant de la warfarine

Ajout de vitamine K pour améliorer la stabilité de l'anticoagulation chez les patients commençant ou recevant déjà de la warfarine

Les personnes atteintes d'irrégularité au niveau de l'activité cardiaque, des valves cardiaques mécaniques et de la coagulation sont à risque accru de développer des caillots de sang, ce qui pourrait entraîner un accident vasculaire cérébral (AVC) ou un décès. L'administration de la warfarine réduit significativement ce risque. Cependant, une dose trop élevée de warfarine peut entraîner des saignements excessifs, tandis qu'une dose trop faible réduit ses effets bénéfiques. Pour surveiller cela, les patients sous warfarine doivent effectuer des analyses sanguines régulières pour vérifier si leur dose de warfarine est suffisamment stable afin de trouver le juste équilibre. Certaines preuves indiquent que l'ajout d'une faible dose de vitamine K à la warfarine améliore cet équilibre. Dans cette revue, nos critères de jugement principaux étaient d'évaluer si l'ajout d'une faible dose de vitamine K à la warfarine avait un effet sur le temps nécessaire au premier RIN en marge, sur la moyenne de la marge thérapeutique, ou si elle provoquait des effets indésirables, tels que des événements thromboemboliques, des hémorragies ou une mortalité. Nous avons identifié deux études qui remplissaient nos critères d'inclusion. Aucune étude ne rapportait le temps nécessaire au premier RIN en marge. Une étude était uniquement disponible en format abrégé, nous n'étions donc pas en mesure d'interpréter les résultats de manière exhaustive.Néanmoins, il a été suggéré que l'ajout de vitamine K ne présentait aucun bénéfice.Une deuxième étude de six mois administrait une faible dose de vitamine K (150 mcg par jour) ou un placebo aux participants sous warfarine avec un contrôle existant du RIN de mauvaise qualité.Cette étude a rapporté la durée moyenne de la marge thérapeutique en pourcentage et a constaté que dans le groupe de participants jugés avoir un contrôle inadéquat du RIN, l'ajout de 150 mcg de vitamine K par voie orale améliorait significativement le contrôle de l'anticoagulation.Cependant, l'étude était de taille relativement petite. Aucune étude ne rapportait d'effets indésirables, tels que la thromboembolie, l'hémorragie ou les décès. Des études supplémentaires de plus grande taille et de meilleure qualité sont donc nécessaires pour déterminer si l'ajout de vitamine K chez les patients commençant ou recevant déjà de la warfarine améliore le contrôle de leur anticoagulation.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé