Formal education of patients about to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

Generally, before being operated on, patients will be given informal information by the healthcare providers involved in the care of the patients (doctors, nurses, ward clerks, or healthcare assistants). This information can also be provided formally in different formats including written information, formal lectures, or audio-visual recorded information.

Objectives

To compare the benefits and harms of formal preoperative patient education for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to March 2013.

Selection criteria

We included only randomised clinical trials irrespective of language and publication status.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted the data. We planned to calculate the risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes based on intention-to-treat analyses when data were available.

Main results

A total of 431 participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to formal patient education (215 participants) versus standard care (216 participants) in four trials. The patient education included verbal education, multimedia DVD programme, computer-based multimedia programme, and PowerPoint presentation in the four trials. All the trials were of high risk of bias. One trial including 212 patients reported mortality. There was no mortality in either group in this trial. None of the trials reported surgery-related morbidity, quality of life, proportion of patients discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the length of hospital stay, return to work, or the number of unplanned visits to the doctor. There were insufficient details to calculate the mean difference and 95% CI for the difference in pain scores at 9 to 24 hours (1 trial; 93 patients); and we did not identify clear evidence of an effect on patient knowledge (3 trials; 338 participants; SMD 0.19; 95% CI -0.02 to 0.41; very low quality evidence), patient satisfaction (2 trials; 305 patients; SMD 0.48; 95% CI -0.42 to 1.37; very low quality evidence), or patient anxiety (1 trial; 76 participants; SMD -0.37; 95% CI -0.82 to 0.09; very low quality evidence) between the two groups.

A total of 173 participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to electronic consent with repeat-back (patients repeating back the information provided) (92 participants) versus electronic consent without repeat-back (81 participants) in one trial of high risk of bias. The only outcome reported in this trial was patient knowledge. The effect on patient knowledge between the patient education with repeat-back versus patient education without repeat-back groups was imprecise and based on 1 trial of 173 participants; SMD 0.07; 95% CI -0.22 to 0.37; very low quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

Due to the very low quality of the current evidence, the effects of formal patient education provided in addition to the standard information provided by doctors to patients compared with standard care remain uncertain. Further well-designed randomised clinical trials of low risk of bias are necessary.

Résumé scientifique

Information formelle des patients devant subir une cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Généralement, avant d'être opérés, les patients reçoivent des informations de façon informelle de la part des professionnels de santé impliqués dans les soins (médecins, infirmiers, secrétaires médicaux ou aides-soignants). Ces informations peuvent aussi être fournies dans un cadre formel dans différents formats, y compris sous forme d'informations écrites, de présentations formelles ou d'enregistrements audio-visuels.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices et les inconvénients de l'information préopératoire formelle pour les patients subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 2, 2013), MEDLINE, EMBASE et Science Citation Index Expanded jusqu'à mars 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus uniquement des essais cliniques randomisés sans restriction de langue ou de statut de publication.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données. Nous avions prévu de calculer le risque relatif avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour les résultats dichotomiques, et la différence moyenne (DM) ou la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) avec IC à 95 % pour les résultats continus en nous basant sur les analyses en intention de traiter lorsque les données étaient disponibles.

Résultats principaux

Un total de 431 participants subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective ont été aléatoirement assignés à l'information formelle du patient (215 participants) ou aux soins standard (216 participants) dans quatre essais. Dans ces quatre essais, l'information des patients incluait l'information verbale, un programme multimédia sur DVD ou sur ordinateur et une présentation PowerPoint. Tous les essais présentaient un risque élevé de biais. Un essai incluant 212 patients rendait compte de la mortalité. Aucune mortalité n'était signalée dans aucun des deux groupes dans cet essai. Aucun des essais ne rapportait la morbidité liée à la chirurgie, la qualité de vie, la proportion de patients sortis au titre de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique ambulatoire, la durée du séjour à l'hôpital, le retour au travail, ou le nombre de visites imprévues chez le médecin. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de détails pour calculer la différence moyenne et l'IC à 95 % pour la différence des scores de douleur au bout de 9 à 24 heures (1 essai ; 93 patients) ; et nous n'avons pas identifié de preuves claires d'un effet sur les connaissances des patients (3 essais ; 338 participants ; DMS 0,19 ; IC à 95 % -0,02 à 0,41 ; preuves de très faible qualité), la satisfaction du patient (2 essais ; 305 patients ; DMS 0,48 ; IC à 95 % -0,42 à 1,37 ; preuves de très faible qualité), ou l'anxiété du patient (1 essai ; 76 participants ; DMS -0,37 ; IC à 95 % -0,82 à 0,09 ; preuves de très faible qualité) entre les deux groupes.

Un total de 173 participants subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective ont été randomisés au consentement électronique avec répétition (les patients répètent les informations fournies) (92 participants) versus consentement électronique sans répétition (81 participants) dans un essai à risque élevé de biais. Le seul critère de jugement rapporté dans cet essai étaient les connaissances du patient. L'effet sur les connaissances du patient entre les groupes ayant reçu l'information avec ou sans répétition était imprécis et basé sur un essai avec 173 participants ; DMS 0,07 ; IC à 95 % -0,22 à 0,37 ; preuves de très faible qualité).

Conclusions des auteurs

En raison de la très faible qualité des preuves actuelles, les effets de l'information formelle des patients en plus de l'information standard fournie par les médecins, comparativement aux soins standard, restent incertains. D'autres essais cliniques randomisés bien conçus et à faible risque de biais sont nécessaires.

Plain language summary

Formal education of patients about to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Background

The liver produces bile, which has many functions including elimination of waste processed by the liver and digestion of fat. The bile is temporarily stored in the gallbladder (an organ situated underneath the liver in the abdomen (belly) before it reaches the small bowel. Concretions in the gallbladder are called gallstones. Gallstones are present in about 5% to 25% of the adult western population. Between 2% and 4% become symptomatic in one year. The symptoms include pain related to the gallbladder (biliary colic), inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), obstruction to the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder into the small bowel resulting in jaundice (yellowish discolouration of the body usually most prominently noticed in the white of the eye, which turns yellow), bile infection (cholangitis), and inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that secretes digestive juices and harbours the insulin-secreting cells that maintain blood sugar level (pancreatitis). Removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy) is currently considered the best treatment option for patients with symptomatic gallstones. This is generally performed by key-hole surgery (laparoscopic cholecystectomy). Generally, before being operated on, patients will be given informal information by the healthcare providers involved in the care of the patients (doctors, nurses, ward clerks, or healthcare assistants). This information is likely to include some information on the type of anaesthesia, expected duration of surgery, expected outcome of surgery including the complications, duration of hospital stay, wound dressing care (if applicable), return to normal activity, and return to work. This information can also be provided formally in different formats including written information, formal lectures, video, or computer presentations. The review authors set out to determine whether it is preferable to provide formal information to the patients before the operation.

Study characteristics

We searched the medical literature in order to identify studies that provided information on the above question. The authors obtained information from randomised trials only since such types of trials provide the best information if conducted well. Two review authors independently identified the trials and collected the information. The information is current to March 2013.

Key results

We found four trials including 431 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy who received either formal patient education (215 participants) or standard care (216 participants). The choice of whether the patient received formal patient education or standard care was determined by a method similar to the toss of a coin in order to create comparable groups of patients. The patient education included providing information by just talking to the patient but in a more formal way or by using various method of presentation. All the trials were of high risk of bias (faults in study design that can result in erroneous conclusions). Only one trial including 212 participants reported deaths after surgery. There were no deaths in either group in this trial. There was no clear evidence of an effect on pain scores at 9 to 24 hours, patient knowledge, patient satisfaction, or patient anxiety associated with education. None of the trials reported surgical complications, quality of life, percentage of patients discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, length of hospital stay, return to work, or the number of unplanned visits to the doctor.

A total of 173 participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy underwent patient education with repeat-back (patients repeating back the information provided) (92 participants) or patient education without repeat-back (81 participants) in one trial of high risk of bias. The only outcome reported in this trial was patient knowledge. The results we found for the effect onpatient knowledge between the patient education with repeat-back and patient education without repeat-back groups were uncertain and we could not exclude possible benefits of either education or control.

Due to the very low quality of the current evidence, we are uncertain as to whether formal patient education provided in addition to the standard information provided by doctors has any benefit to patients. Further well-designed randomised clinical trials are necessary.

Quality of evidence

The overall quality of the evidence was very low.

Résumé simplifié

Information formelle des patients devant subir une cholécystectomie laparoscopique

Contexte

Le foie produit la bile qui a de nombreuses fonctions, notamment l'élimination des déchets traités par le foie et la digestion des graisses. La bile est stockée temporairement dans la vésicule biliaire (un organe situé sous le foie dans l'abdomen (ventre)) avant d'arriver à l'intestin grêle. Les concrétions dans la vésicule biliaire sont appelées calculs biliaires. Les calculs biliaires sont présents chez environ 5 % à 25 % de la population adulte occidentale. Entre 2 % et 4 % deviennent symptomatiques par an. Les symptômes incluent la douleur liée à la vésicule biliaire (colique hépatique), l'inflammation de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystite), l'obstruction à l'écoulement de la bile du foie et de la vésicule biliaire dans l'intestin grêle entraînant un ictère (décoloration jaunâtre de l'organisme généralement principalement observée dans le blanc de l'œil, qui devient jaune), l'infection de la bile (angiocholite), et l'inflammation du pancréas, un organe sécrétant des fluides digestives et hébergeant les cellules productrices d'insuline qui maintiennent le taux de glycémie (pancréatite). L'ablation de la vésicule biliaire (cholécystectomie) est actuellement considérée comme la meilleure option de traitement pour les patients souffrant de calculs biliaires symptomatiques. Elle est généralement réalisée par chirurgie mini-invasive (cholécystectomie laparoscopique). Généralement, avant d'être opérés, les patients sont informés de façon informelle par les professionnels de santé impliqués dans les soins (médecins, infirmiers, secrétaires médicaux ou aides-soignants). Les patients reçoivent des informations notamment sur le type d'anesthésie, la durée prévue de l'opération, les résultats attendus de la chirurgie, y compris les complications, la durée du séjour à l'hôpital, les soins de la plaie (le cas échéant), la reprise des activités normales, et le retour au travail. Ces informations peuvent aussi être fournies dans un cadre formel dans différents formats, y compris sous forme d'informations écrites, de présentations formelles ou sur vidéo ou ordinateur. Les auteurs de la revue ont cherché à déterminer s'il est préférable de fournir une information formelle aux patients avant l'opération.

Caractéristiques des études

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la littérature médicale afin d'identifier les études ayant fourni des renseignements sur la question ci-dessus. Les auteurs ont extrait des informations uniquement à partir d'essais randomisés car ces types d'essais fournissent les meilleures informations quand ils sont menés correctement. Deux auteurs de la revue ont de manière indépendante identifié les essais et recueilli les données. Les informations sont à jour en mars 2013.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons trouvé quatre essais portant sur 431 patients subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective ayant bénéficié soit d'une information formelle du patient (215 participants) ou de soins standard (216 participants). Le choix d'assigner le patient à l'information formelle ou aux soins standard a été déterminé par une méthode similaire à pile ou face afin de créer des groupes de patients comparables. L'information du patient incluait la fourniture d'informations simplement en discutant avec le patient mais de manière plus formelle ou en ayant recours à différentes méthodes de présentation. Tous les essais présentaient un risque élevé de biais (erreurs dans la conception de l'étude pouvant conduire à des conclusions erronées). Un seul essai incluant 212 participants rapportait les décès après la chirurgie. Aucun décès n'est survenue dans aucun des deux groupes dans cet essai. Il n'y avait aucune preuve claire d'un effet associé à l'information du patient sur les scores de douleur au bout de 9 à 24 heures ou les connaissances, la satisfaction et l'anxiété du patient. Aucun des essais ne rendait compte des complications chirurgicales, de la qualité de vie, du pourcentage de patients sortis au titre de la cholécystectomie laparoscopique ambulatoire, de la durée d'hospitalisation, du retour au travail, ou du nombre de visites imprévues chez le médecin.

Un total de 173 participants subissant une cholécystectomie laparoscopique élective ont reçu une information formelle avec répétition (le patient répète l'information fournie) (92 participants) ou sans répétition (81 participants) dans un essai à risque élevé de biais. Le seul critère de jugement rapporté dans cet essai étaient les connaissances du patient. Les résultats que nous avons trouvés pour l'effet sur les connaissances du patient entre les groupes ayant bénéficié de l'information formelle avec ou sans répétition n'étaient pas clairs, et nous n'avons pas pu exclure d'éventuels bénéfices de l'intervention d'information ou de contrôle.

En raison de la très faible qualité des preuves actuelles, nous ne savons pas si l'information formelle des patients en plus de l'information standard fournie par les médecins apporte des bénéfices aux patients. D'autres essais cliniques randomisés bien conçus sont nécessaires.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité globale des preuves était très faible.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé