Intervention Review

Interventions for preventing the spread of infestation in close contacts of people with scabies

  1. Deirdre FitzGerald1,*,
  2. Rachel J Grainger2,
  3. Alex Reid3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Group

Published Online: 24 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009943.pub2

How to Cite

FitzGerald D, Grainger RJ, Reid A. Interventions for preventing the spread of infestation in close contacts of people with scabies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD009943. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009943.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Medmark Occupational Healthcare, Cork, Ireland

  2. 2

    Tallaght Hospital, a teaching hospital of Trinity College Dublin, Microbiology Department, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland

  3. 3

    Tallaght Hospital, a teaching hospital of Trinity College Dublin, Occupational Health Department, Dublin, Ireland

*Deirdre FitzGerald, Medmark Occupational Healthcare, 28 Penrose Wharf, Cork, Ireland. deirdrefitzgerald@physicians.ie.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 24 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Scabies, caused by Sarcoptes scabiei variety hominis or the human itch mite, is a common parasitic infection. While anyone can become infected, it causes significant morbidity in immunocompromised hosts and it spreads easily between human hosts where there is overcrowding or poor sanitation. The most common symptom reported is itch which is worse at night. As the symptoms are attributed to an allergic reaction to the mite, symptoms usually develop between four to six weeks after primary infection. Therefore, people may be infected for some time prior to developing symptoms. During this time, while asymptomatic, they may spread infection to others they are in close contact with. Consequently, it is usually recommended that when an index case is being treated, others who have been in close contact with the index case should also be provided with treatment.

Objectives

To assess the effects of prophylactic interventions for contacts of people with scabies to prevent infestation in the contacts.

Search methods

We searched electronic databases (Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid), Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, OpenGrey and WHO ICTRP) up to November 2013.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cluster RCTs which compared prophylactic interventions which were given to contacts of index cases with scabies infestation. Interventions could be compared to each other, or to placebo or to no treatment. Both drug treatments and non-drug treatments were acceptable.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors intended to extract dichotomous data (developed infection or did not develop infection) for the effects of interventions and report this as risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals. We intended to report any adverse outcomes similarly.

Main results

We did not include any trials in this review. Out of 29 potentially-relevant studies, we excluded 16 RCTs as the data for the contacts were either not reported or were reported only in combination with the outcomes for the index cases. We excluded a further 11 studies as they were not RCTs. We also excluded one study as not all subjects were examined at baseline and follow-up, and another as it was a case study.

Authors' conclusions

The effects of providing prophylactic treatments for contacts of people with scabies to prevent infestation are unknown. We need well-designed RCTs of the use of prophylactic measures to prevent the transmission of scabies conducted with people who had the opportunity for prolonged skin contact with an index case, such as family members, healthcare workers or residential care personnel, within the previous six weeks.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for preventing the spread of infestation in close contacts of people with scabies

Background

Scabies is a common parasitic infection. It is caused by a mite, Sarcoptes scabiei variety hominis, also known as the human itch mite, which depends on humans to survive. Crusted scabies (or Norwegian scabies) is caused by the same mite, but tends to occur in people whose immune system is not working so well, such as transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy, people who misuse alcohol, or other debilitated people. Scabies infection spreads from person to person by skin contact. This is why it is more prevalent in areas with poor sanitation or overcrowding. In high-income countries it tends to spread between family contacts, between people in residential care, or between patients and staff in hospitals. People may be infected with these mites for several weeks before developing symptoms. During this time it is possible to spread the infection to other people. Consequently people who are in contact with suspected cases of scabies infection are often given preventative treatments in an attempt to stop the development of symptoms. Preventive treatment also aims to prevent further spread of the infection and to prevent the person who was the source of infection from getting reinfected. This review is important, as before conducting this review we were unable to say if using preventive treatment helps or not.

What does the research say?

We searched for studies in which people who had been in contact with scabies-infected people had been given medical treatment, or had been advised about personal hygiene to prevent the scabies infection from spreading. We also wanted studies to have been designed so that the treatment received by participants (either medication or advice) was determined by chance. We did not find any studies fulfilling these criteria.

Conclusions

There is currently no evidence to say if treating or advising people who have been in contact with scabies-infected people is effective in preventing the spread of scabies infection. We need researchers to conduct studies with people who may have been in skin contact with a person who has been diagnosed with a scabies infection within the previous six weeks. Half of these people should be given preventive treatment and the other half something else. Who gets what should be determined by chance so that the two groups are truly similar in every respect except the treatment they receive.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour prévenir la propagation de l'infestation en contact proche avec des personnes atteintes de gale

Contexte

La gale, causée par le Sarcoptes scabiei variante hominis ou l'acarien de la gale humaine, est une infection parasitaire commune. Tandis que toute personne peut être infectée, la gale occasionne une morbidité importante chez des hôtes immunodéprimés et se propage facilement entre hôtes humains en cas de surpopulation ou d'installations sanitaires défaillantes. Le symptôme le plus couramment signalé sont des démangeaisons s'empirant la nuit. Les symptômes, attribués à une réaction allergique à l'acarien, se développent généralement entre quatre à six semaines après l'infection primaire. Ainsi, les gens peuvent être infectés depuis un certain temps avant le développement des symptômes. Pendant cette période, tandis qu'elles sont asymptomatiques, ces personnes peuvent propager l'infection à d'autres avec qui elles sont en contact proche. Par conséquent, il est généralement recommandé que lorsqu'un cas primaire est traité, d'autres personnes qui ont été en contact avec lui devraient également recevoir un traitement.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions prophylactiques pour les personnes en contact avec des personnes atteintes de gale pour prévenir l'infestation chez ces contacts.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques (registre spécialisé du groupe de revue Cochrane sur la santé et la sécurité au travail, CENTRAL (Bibliothèque Cochrane), MEDLINE (Ovid), Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, OpenGrey et OMS ICTRP) jusqu'à novembre 2013.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ou ECR en grappes comparant des interventions prophylactiques administrées aux personnes en contact avec des cas primaires d'infestation par la gale. Les interventions pouvaient être comparées à d'autres interventions, à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement. Les traitements médicamenteux et non médicamenteux étaient éligibles.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs devaient extraire les données dichotomiques (personnes ayant développé une infection ou non) pour les effets des interventions et les rapporter sous forme de risques relatifs avec intervalles de confiance à 95 %. Nous avions prévu de rapporter de la même façon les résultats indésirables.

Résultats Principaux

Nous n'avons inclus aucun essai dans cette revue. Sur 29 études potentiellement pertinentes, nous avons exclu 16 ECR, car les données concernant les contacts n'étaient pas mentionnées ou étaient rapportées uniquement ensemble avec les critères de jugement concernant les cas primaires. Nous avons exclu 11 autres études car elles n'étaient pas des ECR. Nous avons également exclu une étude dans laquelle tous les sujets n'ont pas été examinés au départ et pendant le suivi, et une autre car il s'agissait d'une étude de cas.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les effets de l'administration de traitements prophylactiques aux personnes en contact avec des personnes atteintes de gale pour prévenir l'infestation sont inconnus. Nous avons besoin d'ECR bien conçus sur l'utilisation de mesures prophylactiques pour prévenir la transmission de la gale, réalisés auprès de personnes ayant eu l'occasion d'entrer en contact cutané prolongé avec un cas primaire dans les six semaines précédentes, telles que les membres de la famille ou le personnel de santé ou de résidence.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour prévenir la propagation de l'infestation en contact proche avec des personnes atteintes de gale

Interventions pour prévenir la propagation de l'infestation en contact proche avec des personnes atteintes de gale

Contexte

La gale est une infection parasitaire commune. Elle est causée par un acarien, le Sarcoptes scabiei variante hominis, ou acarien de la gale humaine, qui dépend de l'Homme pour survivre. La gale croûteuse (ou gale norvégienne) est causée par le même acarien, mais elle survient plutôt chez les personnes dont le système immunitaire ne fonctionne pas très bien, telles que les patients greffés sous traitement immunosuppresseur, les personnes abusant de l'alcool, ou autrement affaiblies. L'infection de la gale se transmet d'une personne à l'autre par contact cutané. C'est pourquoi elle est plus fréquente dans les régions avec des installations sanitaires insuffisantes ou surpeuplées. Dans les pays à revenu élevé, la gale a tendance à se propager par contact entre les membres d'une même famille, parmi les populations vivant en résidence, ou entre les patients et le personnel dans les hôpitaux. Les gens peuvent être infestés par ces acariens pendant plusieurs semaines avant le développement des symptômes. Au cours de cette période, ils peuvent propager l'infection à d'autres personnes. Par conséquent, un traitement préventif est souvent administré aux personnes qui sont en contact avec des cas suspectés d'infection par la gale pour essayer d'arrêter le développement des symptômes. Le traitement préventif vise également à prévenir la propagation de l'infection et à empêcher la personne à l'origine de l'infection de se réinfecter. Cette revue est importante, car avant sa réalisation nous ne savions pas si l'utilisation d'un traitement préventif aidait ou non.

Que dit la recherche ?

Nous avons recherché des études dans lesquelles les personnes ayant été en contact avec des personnes infectées par la gale avaient reçu un traitement médical ou avaient été informées de l'hygiène personnelle pour prévenir la propagation de l'infection par la gale. Nous voulions également que les études aient été conçues de sorte que le traitement reçu par les participants (médicaments ou conseils) était déterminé par le hasard. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune étude remplissant ces critères.

Conclusions

Il n'existe actuellement aucune preuve pour déterminer si un traitement ou des conseils fournis aux personnes ayant été en contact avec des personnes infectées par la gale sont efficaces dans la prévention de la propagation de l'infection de la gale. Il faut que des chercheurs réalisent des études portant sur des personnes qui pourraient avoir été en contact cutané avec une personne diagnostiquée avec une infection par la gale dans les six semaines précédentes. La moitié de ces personnes doivent recevoir un traitement préventif et l'autre moitié quelque chose autre. Ce que chaque participant reçoit devrait être déterminé par le hasard, de sorte que les deux groupes soient véritablement similaires à tous les égards à l'exception du traitement reçu.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé