Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Non pharmacological interventions for spasticity in multiple sclerosis

  1. Bhasker Amatya1,*,
  2. Fary Khan1,2,3,
  3. Loredana La Mantia4,
  4. Marina Demetrios1,
  5. Derick T Wade5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the Central Nervous System Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009974.pub2


How to Cite

Amatya B, Khan F, La Mantia L, Demetrios M, Wade DT. Non pharmacological interventions for spasticity in multiple sclerosis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD009974. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009974.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Melbourne Hospital, Royal Park Campus, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  2. 2

    Monash University, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  4. 4

    I.R.C.C.S. Santa Maria Nascente Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Unit of Neurology - Multiple Sclerosis Center, Milano, Italy

  5. 5

    University of Oxford, Oxford Centre for Enablement, Oxford, UK

*Bhasker Amatya, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Royal Park Campus, Poplar Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, 3052, Australia. Bhasker.Amatya@mh.org.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Spasticity is commonly experienced by people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and it contributes to overall disability in this population. A wide range of non pharmacological interventions are used in isolation or with pharmacological agents to treat spasticity in MS. Evidence for their effectiveness is yet to be determined. 

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of various non pharmacological interventions for the treatment of spasticity in adults with MS.

Search methods

A literature search was performed using the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the Central Nervous System Review Group on using the Cochrane MS Group Trials Register which among other sources, contains CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PEDRO in June 2012. Manual searching in the relevant journals and screening of the reference lists of identified studies and reviews were carried out. Abstracts published in proceedings of conferences were also scrutinised.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that reported non pharmacological intervention/s for treatment of spasticity in adults with MS and compared them with some form of control intervention (such as sham/placebo interventions or lower level or different types of intervention, minimal intervention, waiting list controls or no treatment; interventions given in different settings), were included.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently selected the studies, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the studies using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) tool for best-evidence synthesis. A meta-analysis was not possible due to methodological, clinical and statistical heterogeneity of included studies.

Main results

Nine RCTs (N = 341 participants, 301 included in analyses) investigated various types and intensities of non pharmacological interventions for treating spasticity in adults with MS. These interventions included: physical activity programmes (such as physiotherapy, structured exercise programme, sports climbing); transcranial magnetic stimulation (Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS), Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)); electromagnetic therapy (pulsed electromagnetic therapy; magnetic pulsing device), Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS); and Whole Body Vibration (WBV). All studies scored 'low' on the methodological quality assessment implying high risk of bias. 

There is 'low level' evidence for physical activity programmes used in isolation or in combination with other interventions (pharmacological or non pharmacological), and for repetitive magnetic stimulation (iTBS/rTMS) with or without adjuvant exercise therapy in improving spasticity in adults with MS. No evidence of benefit exists to support the use of TENS, sports climbing and vibration therapy for treating spasticity in this population.

Authors' conclusions

There is 'low level' evidence for non pharmacological interventions such as physical activities given in conjunction with other interventions, and for magnetic stimulation and electromagnetic therapies for beneficial effects on spasticity outcomes in people with MS. A wide range of non pharmacological interventions are used for the treatment of spasticity in MS, but more robust trials are needed to build evidence about these interventions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Non pharmacological interventions for treatment of spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Spasticity is a common and debilitating symptom, causing ‘stiffness’, ‘spasms’ or ‘tightness’ in the weakened arm or leg in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Overall, spasticity is difficult to treat. Current treatments include various medications (such as botulinum toxin injections to relax the affected muscles) and non drug methods aiming to achieve functional goals for patients (and their caregivers) such as physiotherapy, magnetic stimulation, electromagnetic therapy, vibration therapy. In this review, nine studies evaluating various non drug treatments to treat spasticity in adult with MS were included, comprising a total of 341 participants. Results from these studies suggest that all included non pharmacological therapies have low level of evidence or no evidence in improving spasticity in people with MS. However, caution should be used in the interpretation of the results, due to the poor methodological quality of all the included studies. More research is needed to determine the usefulness of these interventions before they can be recommended as routine treatments.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions non pharmacologiques contre la spasticité dans la sclérose en plaques

Contexte

La spasticité touche généralement les personnes atteintes de sclérose en plaque (SEP) et elle contribue à l'invalidité globale de cette population. Un large éventail d'interventions non pharmacologiques sont utilisées seules ou avec des agents pharmacologiques pour traiter la spasticité dans la SEP. Les preuves de leur efficacité restent encore à être déterminées.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de différentes interventions non pharmacologiques pour le traitement de la spasticité chez les adultes atteints de SEP.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En juin 2012, des recherches documentaires ont été effectuées dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la sclérose en plaques, du groupe thématique Cochrane sur les maladies rares du système nerveux central et le registre d'essais sur groupe Cochrane sur la sclérose en plaques qui, parmi d'autres ressources, contient CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PEDRO. Des recherches manuelles ont été effectuées dans les journaux pertinents, ainsi que l'analyse des listes bibliographiques des études et revues identifiées. Les résumés publiés dans des actes de conférence ont également été examinés.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), qui rendaient compte d'interventions non pharmacologiques pour le traitement de la spasticité chez les adultes atteints de SEP et qui les comparaient à une forme d'intervention témoin (comme les interventions « fantôme »/placebo ou de niveau inférieur ou différents types d'interventions, une intervention minimale, des groupes témoins en liste d'attente ou l'absence de traitement ; des interventions pratiquées dans des contextes différents), étaient inclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné les études, extrait des données et évalué la qualité méthodologique des études à l'aide de l'outil GRADE (pour « Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation ») afin de rédiger une synthèse des preuves les plus probantes. Aucune méta-analyse n'a pu être réalisée en raison de l'hétérogénéité méthodologique, clinique et statistique des études incluses.

Résultats Principaux

Neuf ECR (N = 341 participants, 301 inclus dans les analyses) examinaient différents types et intensités d'interventions non pharmacologiques pour le traitement de la spasticité chez les adultes atteints de SEP. Ces interventions incluaient : des programmes d'activités physiques (comme la kinésithérapie, un programme d'exercices structurés, l'escalade) ; la stimulation magnétique transcrânienne (stimulation intermittente par thêta-burst (iTBS pour « Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation »), la stimulation magnétique transcrânienne répétitive (rTMS pour « Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation »)) ; la thérapie électromagnétique (thérapie électromagnétique pulsée ; dispositif d'impulsions magnétiques), la stimulation nerveuse électrique transcutanée (TENS pour « Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation ») et les vibrations globales du corps (WBV pour « Whole Body Vibration »). La qualité méthodologique de toutes les études était « médiocre », ce qui impliquait des risques de biais élevés.

Il existe des preuves « médiocres » concernant les programmes d'activité physique utilisés seuls ou combinés à d'autres interventions (pharmacologiques ou non pharmacologiques) et concernant la stimulation magnétique répétitive (iTBS/rTMS) avec ou sans thérapie d'exercice adjuvante dans l'amélioration de la spasticité chez les adultes atteints de SEP. Il n'existe aucune preuve d'effets bénéfiques pour recommander le recours à une TENS, à l'escalade et à une thérapie de vibrations dans le traitement de la spasticité chez cette population.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe des preuves « médiocres » concernant les interventions non pharmacologiques, comme les activités physiques combinées à d'autres interventions, et concernant les thérapies de stimulation magnétique et électromagnétiques en termes d'effets bénéfiques sur les résultats de la spasticité chez les personnes atteintes de SEP. Un large éventail d'interventions non pharmacologiques sont utilisées pour le traitement de la spasticité dans la SEP, mais d'autres essais plus fiables seront nécessaires pour identifier des preuves relatives à ces interventions.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions non pharmacologiques contre la spasticité dans la sclérose en plaques

Interventions non pharmacologiques pour le traitement de la spasticité dans la sclérose en plaques (SEP)

La spasticité est un symptôme courant et invalidant, provoquant des « raideurs », des « spasmes » ou des « crampes » au niveau du bras ou de la jambe affaibli(e) chez les personnes atteintes de sclérose en plaques (SEP). La spasticité est généralement difficile à traiter. Les traitements actuels incluent différents médicaments (comme des injections de toxine botulique pour détendre les muscles affectés) et des méthodes non médicamenteuses visant à atteindre des objectifs fonctionnels pour les patients (et leurs soignants) comme la kinésithérapie, la stimulation magnétique, la thérapie électromagnétique, la thérapie de vibration. Dans la présente revue, neuf études, totalisant 341 participants, évaluant plusieurs traitements non médicamenteux contre la spasticité chez les adultes atteints de SEP, ont été incluses. Leurs résultats suggèrent que tous les traitements non pharmacologiques inclus présentent de faibles niveaux de preuves, voire aucune preuve, concernant l'amélioration de la spasticité chez ces personnes. Toutefois, ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence en raison de la qualité méthodologique médiocre de l'ensemble des études incluses. D'autres recherches seront nécessaires pour déterminer l'utilité de ces interventions avant de les recommander en tant que traitements systématiques.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.