Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Decentralising HIV treatment in lower- and middle-income countries

  1. Tamara Kredo1,*,
  2. Nathan Ford2,
  3. Folasade B Adeniyi3,
  4. Paul Garner4

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 27 JUN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 26 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009987.pub2


How to Cite

Kredo T, Ford N, Adeniyi FB, Garner P. Decentralising HIV treatment in lower- and middle-income countries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD009987. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009987.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    South African Medical Research Council, South African Cochrane Centre, Tygerberg, Western Cape, South Africa

  2. 2

    Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland

  3. 3

    Stellenbosch University, Centre for Evidence-based Health Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Tygerberg, Cape Town, South Africa

  4. 4

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool, Merseyside, UK

*Tamara Kredo, South African Cochrane Centre, South African Medical Research Council, PO Box 19070, Tygerberg, Western Cape, 7505, South Africa. tamara.kredo@mrc.ac.za.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 27 JUN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Background

Policy makers, health staff and communities recognise that health services in lower- and middle-income countries need to improve people's access to HIV treatment and retention to treatment programmes. One strategy is to move antiretroviral delivery from hospitals to more peripheral health facilities or even beyond health facilities. This could increase the number of people with access to care, improve health outcomes, and enhance retention in treatment programmes. On the other hand, providing care at less sophisticated levels in the health service or at community-level may decrease quality of care and result in worse health outcomes. To address these uncertainties, we summarised the research studies examining the risks and benefits of decentralising antiretroviral therapy service delivery.

Objectives

To assess the effects of various models that decentralised HIV treatment and care to more basic levels in the health system for initiating and maintaining antiretroviral therapy.

Search methods

We conducted a comprehensive search to identify all relevant studies regardless of language or publication status (published, unpublished, in press, and in progress) from 1 January 1996 to 31 March 2013, and contacted relevant organisations and researchers. The search terms included 'decentralisation', 'down referral', 'delivery of health care', and 'health services accessibility'.

Selection criteria

Our inclusion criteria were controlled trials (randomised and non-randomised), controlled-before and after studies, and cohorts (prospective and retrospective) in which HIV-infected people were either initiated on antiretroviral therapy or maintained on therapy in a decentralised setting in lower- and middle-income countries. We define decentralisation as providing treatment at a more basic level in the health system to the comparator.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors applied the inclusion criteria and extracted data independently. We designed a framework to describe different decentralisation strategies, and then grouped studies against these strategies. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Because loss to follow up in HIV programmes is known to include some deaths, we used attrition as our primary outcome, defined as death plus loss to follow-up. We assessed evidence quality with GRADE methodology.

Main results

Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria, all but one were from Africa, comprising two cluster randomised trials and 14 cohort studies. Antiretroviral therapy started at a hospital and maintained at a health centre (partial decentralisation) probably reduces attrition (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.71, 4 studies, 39 090 patients, moderate quality evidence). There may be fewer patients lost to care with this model (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.69, low quality evidence).

We are uncertain whether there is a difference in attrition for antiretroviral therapy started and maintained at a health centre (full decentralisation) compared to a hospital at 12 months (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.02; four studies, 56 360 patients, very low quality evidence), but there are probably fewer patients lost to care with this model (RR 0.3, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.54, moderate quality evidence).

When antiretroviral maintenance therapy is delivered at home by trained volunteers, there is probably no difference in attrition at 12 months (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.46, two trials, 1453 patients, moderate quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

Decentralisation of HIV care aims to improve patient access and retention in care. Most data were from good quality cohort studies but confounding between site of treatment and outcomes cannot be excluded. Nevertheless, this review found that attrition appears to be lower in partial decentralisation models of treatment, where antiretrovirals were started at hospital and continued in the health centre; with antiretroviral drugs started and continued at health centres, no difference in attrition was detected, but there were fewer patients lost to care. For antiretroviral therapy provided at home by trained volunteers, no difference in outcomes were detected when compared to facility-based care.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Providing antiretroviral therapy closer to patients homes to improve access to care in lower- and middle-income countries

Background

Many people living with HIV who need antiretroviral therapy are unable to access or remain in care. This is often because of the time and cost required to travel to health centres. One approach to facilitating access and retention in care is to provide antiretroviral therapy close to people’s homes, ‘decentralising’ treatment from hospitals to health centres or even to the community. We wanted to assess whether decentralisation of antiretroviral therapy reduced the number of people lost to follow-up. Because loss to follow-up in HIV programmes is known to include some people who have died, our main outcome of interest was 'attrition', which is the number of people who have either died or been lost to follow-up.

Study characteristics

We searched for studies up to March 2013. We found 16 studies, including two high quality randomised controlled trials and 14 studies collecting data from HIV care programmes. All but one study was conducted in Africa. The study participants included both adults and children who were followed-up for up to two years.

We describe three types of care:

- Partial decentralisation: starting antiretroviral therapy at the hospital, then moving to a health centre to continue treatment

- Full decentralisation: starting and continuing treatment at a health centre

- Providing antiretroviral therapy in the community: antiretroviral therapy is started at a health centre or hospital and thereafter provided in the community

Key results

We found that if antiretroviral therapy was started at a hospital and continued in a health centre (partial decentralisation), there was probably less attrition and fewer patients were lost to care after one year (four studies, 39 090 patients).

Where antiretroviral therapy was started and continued at a health centre (full decentralisation), there was probably no difference in the number of deaths and patients lost to follow-up (attrition), but overall, there were probably fewer patients lost to care after one year (four studies, 56 360 patients).

If antiretroviral therapy was provided in the community, by trained volunteers, there was probably no difference detected in death or losses to care when compared to care provided at a health centre after one year (two studies, 1 453 patients).

Overall, none of the models of decentralisation led to worse health outcomes. The research indicates that fewer patients are lost to care when they are continued on antiretroviral therapy at health centres rather than in hospitals. The research also did not detect a difference in the numbers of patients lost to care when they are treated in the community rather than in a health facility.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Décentralisation du traitement anti-VIH dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Contexte

Les décideurs politiques, le personnel médical et les communautés reconnaissent que les services de santé dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire ont besoin d'améliorer l'accès de la population au traitement anti-VIH et le maintien dans les programmes de traitement. Une stratégie consiste à déplacer les points d'accès au traitement antirétroviral depuis les hôpitaux vers des établissement de soins de santé plus périphériques voire au-delà des établissements de soins de santé. Cela pourrait accroître le nombre de personnes ayant accès aux soins, améliorer les résultats sur la santé, et renforcer le maintien dans les programmes de traitement. En revanche, permettre l'accès aux soins à des niveaux moins sophistiqués dans le service de soins ou au niveau de la communauté peut éventuellement diminuer la qualité des soins et entraîner une aggravation des conséquences sur la santé. Afin de lever ces incertitudes, nous avons résumé les études de recherche examinant les risques et les bénéfices de la décentralisation de l'accès aux services de soins administrant le traitement antirétroviral.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de différents modèles qui ont décentralisé le traitement et les soins anti-VIH jusqu'à des niveaux plus élémentaires dans le système de santé afin d'instaurer et de maintenir le traitement antirétroviral.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche exhaustive afin d'identifier toutes les études pertinentes indépendamment de la langue ou du statut de publication (publiée, non publiée, sous presse et en cours) du 1er janvier 1996 au 31 mars 2013, et contacté les organismes de santé et les chercheurs compétents. Les termes de recherche utilisés comprenaient 'décentralisation', 'consultation de spécialistes', 'accès aux soins de santé' et 'accessibilité des services de soins'.

Critères de sélection

Nos critères d'inclusion étaient des essais contrôlés (randomisés et non randomisés), des études contrôlées avant-après et des cohortes (prospectives et rétrospectives) dans lesquels les personnes infectées par le VIH ont soit démarré un traitement antirétroviral soit maintenu le traitement dans un contexte de décentralisation dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire. Nous définissons la décentralisation par le fait de délivrer un traitement à un niveau plus élémentaire dans le système de santé par rapport au comparateur.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont appliqué les critères d’inclusion et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Nous avons conçu un cadre pour décrire différentes stratégies de décentralisation, puis nous avons regroupé les études par rapport à ces stratégies. Les données ont été regroupées au moyen de modèles de méta-analyses utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires. Dans la mesure où l'on sait que la perte de suivi dans les programmes de traitement anti-VIH inclut certains décès, nous avons utilisé l'attrition comme principal critère de jugement de notre revue, définie comme étant le décès plus la perte de suivi. Nous avons évalué la qualité des preuves au moyen de la méthodologie GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Seize études répondaient aux critères d'inclusion, toutes sauf une ont été réalisées en Afrique, et comprenaient 2 essais randomisés en cluster et 14 études de cohortes. Le traitement antirétroviral démarré à l'hôpital et maintenu dans un centre de soins (décentralisation partielle) réduit probablement l'attrition (RR 0,46, IC à 95 % 0,29 à 0,71, 4 études, 39 090 patients, preuves de qualité moyenne). Les patients ayant abandonné les soins avec ce modèle sont peut-être moins nombreux (RR 0,55, IC à 95 % 0,45 à 0,69, preuves de faible qualité).

Nous n'avons pas établi avec certitude s'il y a une différence en termes d'attrition pour le traitement antirétroviral démarré et maintenu dans un centre de soins (décentralisation totale) comparativement à l'hôpital au bout de 12 mois (RR 0,70, IC à 95 % 0,47 à 1,02 ; quatre études, 56 360 patients, preuves de très faible qualité), mais les patients ayant abandonné les soins avec ce modèle sont probablement moins nombreux (RR 0,3, IC à 95 % 0,17 à 0,54, preuves de qualité moyenne).

Lorsque le traitement antirétroviral d'entretien est délivré à domicile par des volontaires formés, il n'y a probablement aucune différence en termes d'attrition au bout de 12 mois (RR 0,95, IC à 95 % 0,62 à 1,46, deux essais, 1 453 patients, preuves de qualité moyenne).

Conclusions des auteurs

La décentralisation des soins anti-VIH vise à améliorer l'accès et le maintien des patients dans les programmes de soins. La plupart des données étaient issues d'études de cohortes de bonne qualité mais on ne peut pas exclure la possibilité d'une confusion entre le site de traitement et les résultats. Néanmoins, cette revue a révélé que l'attrition semble être plus faible dans les modèles de décentralisation partielle de traitement, dans lesquels les antirétroviraux ont été démarrés à l'hôpital et poursuivis dans le centre de soins ; avec les médicaments antirétroviraux démarrés et poursuivis dans les centres de soins, aucune différence en termes d'attrition n'a été détectée, mais les patients ayant abandonné les soins étaient moins nombreux. Pour le traitement antirétroviral délivré à domicile par des volontaires formés, aucune différence n'a été détectée dans les résultats comparativement aux soins délivrés dans les établissements de soins de santé.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Décentralisation du traitement anti-VIH dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Dispenser un traitement antirétroviral plus près du domicile des patients afin d'améliorer l'accès aux soins dans les pays à revenu faible et intermédiaire

Contexte

De nombreuses personnes vivant avec le VIH qui nécessitent un traitement antirétroviral ne peuvent pas accéder aux soins ou rester sous traitement. Cela tient souvent au temps et au coût nécessaires pour se déplacer jusqu'aux centres de soins. Une approche permettant de faciliter l'accès aux soins et le maintien sous thérapie consiste à dispenser le traitement antirétroviral à proximité du domicile des habitants, soit la ‘décentralisation’ des services de traitement depuis les hôpitaux vers des centres de soins, voire au sein même de la communauté. Nous souhaitions évaluer si la décentralisation du traitement antirétroviral avait réduit le nombre de personnes perdues de vue. Dans la mesure où l'on sait que la perte de suivi dans les programmes de lutte contre le VIH inclut certaines personnes qui sont décédées, notre principal critère de jugement intéressant était 'l'attrition', qui est le nombre de personnes qui sont soit décédées soit perdues de vue.

Caractéristiques des études

Nous avons effectué des recherches d'études jusqu'au mois de mars 2013. Nous avons trouvé 16 études, incluant 2 essais contrôlés randomisés de bonne qualité et 14 études consistant à recueillir des données à partir des programmes de soins anti-VIH. Toutes les études sauf une ont été menées en Afrique. Les participants aux études incluaient des adultes ainsi que des enfants qui avaient été suivis pendant un maximum de deux ans.

Nous décrivons ici trois types de soins :

- Décentralisation partielle : démarrage du traitement antirétroviral à l'hôpital, puis orientation vers un centre de soins pour continuer le traitement.

- Décentralisation totale : démarrage et poursuite du traitement dans un centre de soins.

- Accès au traitement antirétroviral au sein de la communauté : le traitement antirétroviral est démarré dans un centre de soins ou à l'hôpital puis est délivré au sein de la communauté.

Principaux résultats

Nous avons constaté que si un traitement antirétroviral était démarré à l'hôpital et poursuivi dans un centre de soins (décentralisation partielle), l'attrition était probablement plus faible et les patients ayant abandonné les soins au bout d'une année étaient moins nombreux (quatre études, 39 090 patients).

Lorsque le traitement antirétroviral était démarré et poursuivi dans un centre de soins (décentralisation totale), il n'y avait probablement aucune différence en termes de nombre de décès et de patients perdus de vue (attrition), mais globalement, les patients ayant abandonné les soins au bout d'une année étaient probablement moins nombreux (quatre études, 56 360 patients).

Si le traitement antirétroviral était délivré au sein de la communauté, par des volontaires formés, il n'y avait probablement aucune différence détectée dans le nombre de décès ou de patients ayant abandonné les soins comparativement aux soins délivrés dans un centre de soins au bout d'une année (deux études, 1 453 patients).

Dans l'ensemble, aucun des modèles de décentralisation n'a entraîné une aggravation des conséquences sur la santé. La recherche indique que les patients qui abandonnent les soins sont moins nombreux lorsqu'ils continuent le traitement antirétroviral dans les centres de soins que dans les hôpitaux. La recherche n'a pas non plus détecté de différence en termes de nombre de patients ayant abandonné les soins lorsqu'ils sont traités au sein de la communauté au lieu d'un établissement de soins de santé.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 7th August, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Descentralização do tratamento para HIV em países de baixa e média renda

Background

Os tomadores de decisão, os profissionais da saúde e as comunidades reconhecem que os serviços de saúde em países de baixa e média renda precisam melhorar o acesso das pessoas ao tratamento do HIV e sua retenção nos programas de tratamento. Uma estratégia seria deslocar a distribuição dos medicamentos antiretrovirais de dentro dos hospitais para os serviços de saúde mais periféricos ou até mesmo para fora dos serviços de saúde. Isto poderia aumentar o número de pessoas que recebem cuidados, melhorar os desfechos de saúde e melhorar a retenção nos programas de tratamento. Por outro lado, oferecer tratamento em serviços de saúde menos sofisticados ou mesmo em nível comunitário, pode diminuir a qualidade dos cuidados e resultar em uma piora dos desfechos. Para avaliar esta questão, resumimos os achados dos estudos que examinaram os riscos e os benefícios de descentralizar os serviços de terapia antiretroviral.

Objectives

Avaliar os efeitos de vários modelos de descentralização de cuidados e tratamento do HIV para níveis básicos dos sistemas de saúde, sobre a introdução e a manutenção da terapia antiretroviral.

Search methods

Foi realizada uma busca compreensiva para identificar todos os estudos relevantes independente do idioma ou status de publicação (publicados, não publicados, em vias de publicação ou em andamento) desde 1º de Janeiro de 1966 até 31 de Março de 2013. Também entramos em contato com organizações e pesquisadores relevantes. Incluímos nas buscas as seguinte palavras: ’decentralisation’, ’down referral’, ’delivery of health care’, and ’health services accessibility’.

Selection criteria

Foram incluídos ensaios controlados (randomizados e não-randomizados), estudos controlados antes e depois, assim como estudos coortes (prospectivos ou retrospectivos) com pessoas infectadas com HIV que iniciaram ou continuaram sua terapia antiretroviral em um serviço descentralizado, em países de baixa ou média renda. Descentralização foi definida como sendo a oferta do tratamento em um nível mais básico do sistema de saúde em relação ao comparador.

Data collection and analysis

Dois autores avaliaram, de forma independente, se os estudos preenchiam os critérios de inclusão e fizeram a extração dos dados. Criamos um esquema para descrever as diferentes estratégias de descentralização e a seguir agrupamos os estudos dentro dessas estratégias. Os dados foram combinados usando uma metanálise com modelo de efeito randômico. Como as perdas do seguimento nos programas de HIV podem incluir mortes, nosso desfecho primário foi “perdas", definida como mortes mais perdas do seguimento. Avaliamos a qualidade da evidência usando a metodologia GRADE.

Main results

Dezesseis estudos preencheram os critérios de inclusão, sendo que todos exceto um foram realizados na África; 2 dos estudos eram ensaios clínicos do tipo cluster e 14 eram estudos de coorte. A terapia antiretroviral iniciada no hospital e mantida em postos de saúde (descentralização parcial) provavelmente reduz as perdas (RR 0,46, IC 95% 0,29 – 0,71, 4 estudos, 39 090 pacientes, evidência de moderada qualidade). Com este modelo, é possível que menos pacientes deixem de receber cuidados (RR 0,55, IC 95% 0,45 – 0,69, evidência de baixa qualidade).

Há dúvidas se existe uma diferença nas perdas, avaliadas aos 12 meses, na comparação entre terapias antiretrovirais que foram iniciadas e continuadas em postos de saúde (descentralização completa) versus em hospital (RR 0,70, IC 95% 0,47 – 1,02; quatro estudos, 56.360 pacientes, evidência de muito baixa qualidade); porém é provável que menos pacientes deixem de receber cuidados com esse modelo de assistência (RR 0,30, IC 95% 0,17 – 0,54, evidência de moderada qualidade).

Quando a manutenção da terapia antiretroviral é oferecida em casa por voluntários, é provável que não haja diferença nas perdas aos 12 meses (RR 0,95, IC 95% 0,62 – 1,46, dois estudos, 1453 pacientes, evidência de qualidade moderada).

Authors' conclusions

A descentralização do tratamento do HIV busca melhorar o acesso dos pacientes e sua retenção no programa de cuidados. Apesar da maioria dos dados desta revisão terem vindo de estudos coortes de boa qualidade, não podemos afastar a possibilidade de existirem fatores de confusão no local de tratamento e nos desfechos. Todavia, esta revisão conclui que as perdas parecem ser menores em modelos de tratamento com descentralização parcial, onde o início da terapia antiretroviral ocorre em ambiente hospitalar e continua em postos de saúde. Quando o início e a continuação do tratamento ocorre nos postos de saúde, não foi detectada nenhuma diferença nas perdas, porém houve um número menor de pacientes que não receberam cuidados. Não foram observadas diferenças nos desfechos na comparação entre cuidados oferecidos em ambientes médicos versus tratamento antiretroviral oferecido em casa por voluntários treinados.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Descentralização do tratamento para HIV em países de baixa e média renda

Oferecer terapia antiretroviral perto da casa do paciente para melhorar acesso ao tratamento em países de baixa e média renda

Introdução

Muitas pessoas com o HIV que precisam de terapia antiretroviral não tem acesso ou não conseguem continuar a receber os cuidados necessários para seu tratamento. Isto frequentemente se deve ao tempo e custos necessários para se deslocarem até os locais de tratamento. Uma forma para facilitar o acesso e a continuidade dos cuidados seria fazer com que a terapia antirretroviral pudesse estar disponível em locais próximos de onde os pacientes moram, “descentralizando" o tratamento dos hospitais para os centros de saúde ou até mesmo para a comunidade. Nosso objetivo foi avaliar se a descentralização da terapia antirretroviral reduziria o número de pessoas que abandonam o tratamento (perdas de follow-up). Como uma parte das perdas de follow-up em programas de tratamento de HIV se deve à pessoas que morreram, nosso principal desfecho foi “perdas" definida como o número de pessoas que morreram ou que abandonaram o acompanhamento.

Características do estudo

Procuramos por estudos publicados até Março de 2013. Encontramos 16 estudos, sendo dois ensaios clínicos randomizados de alta qualidade e 14 outros estudos, que apresentavam dados de programas de cuidados de HIV. Todos os estudos, exceto um, foram conduzidos na Africa. Os participantes dos estudos eram tanto adultos como crianças que foram acompanhados por até dois anos.

Existem três tipos de formas de tratamento:

- Descentralização parcial: a terapia antiretroviral começa no hospital e depois continua em um posto de saúde.

- Descentralização total: o tratamento começa e continua em um posto de saúde.

- Terapia antiretroviral na comunidade: o tratamento começa no posto de saúde ou no hospital e depois continua na comunidade.

Resultados-chave

Os estudos mostram que se a terapia antiretroviral começa no hospital e continua em um posto de saúde (descentralização parcial), é provável haver menos perdas e um menor número de pacientes sem acompanhamento ao final de um ano (quatro estudos, 39 090 pacientes).

Quando a terapia antiretroviral é iniciada e continuada em um posto de saúde (descentralização total), é provável que não existam diferenças no número de mortes e de pacientes que abandonaram o acompanhamento (perdas), mas em geral, provavelmente vão existir menos pacientes sem tratamento ao final de um ano (quatro estudos, 56 360 pacientes).

Se a terapia é continuada na comunidade por voluntários treinados, é provável que não haja diferença no número de mortes ou de pacientes que abandonaram o tratamento ao final de um ano, quando comparado ao tratamento oferecido em postos de saúde (dois estudos, 1 453 pacientes).

Em geral, nenhum dos modelos de descentralização levaram à piores desfechos de saúde. Os estudos indicam que menos pacientes ficam sem cuidados quando o tratamento é continuado em postos de saúde do que quando é continuado nos hospitais. Os estudos também não detectaram diferenças no número de pacientes sem cuidados quando eles receberam o tratamento na comunidade em comparação com o tratamento em instituições de saúde.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre