Smartphone and tablet self management apps for asthma

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • José S Marcano Belisario,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, London, UK
    • José S Marcano Belisario, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. jose.marcano-belisario10@imperial.ac.uk.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kit Huckvale,

    1. School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Geva Greenfield,

    1. School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Josip Car,

    1. Imperial College London, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, London, UK
    2. University of Ljubljana, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ljubljana, Slovenia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Laura H Gunn

    1. Stetson University, Integrative Health Science, DeLand, Florida, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Asthma is one of the most common long-term conditions worldwide, which places considerable pressure on patients, communities and health systems. The major international clinical guidelines now recommend the inclusion of self management programmes in the routine management of patients with asthma. These programmes have been associated with improved outcomes in patients with asthma. However, the implementation of self management programmes in clinical practice, and their uptake by patients, is still poor. Recent developments in mobile technology, such as smartphone and tablet computer apps, could help develop a platform for the delivery of self management interventions that are highly customisable, low-cost and easily accessible.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of using smartphone and tablet apps to facilitate the self management of individuals with asthma.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register (CAGR), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health Library, Compendex/Inspec/Referex, IEEEXplore, ACM Digital Library, CiteSeerx and CAB abstracts via Web of Knowledge. We also searched registers of current and ongoing trials and the grey literature. We checked the reference lists of all primary studies and review articles for additional references. We searched for studies published from 2000 onwards. The latest search was run in June 2013.

Selection criteria

We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared self management interventions for patients with clinician-diagnosed asthma delivered via smartphone apps to self management interventions delivered via traditional methods (e.g. paper-based asthma diaries).

Data collection and analysis

We used standard methods expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. Our primary outcomes were symptom scores; frequency of healthcare visits due to asthma exacerbations or complications and health-related quality of life.

Main results

We included two RCTs with a total of 408 participants. We found no cluster RCTs, controlled before and after studies or interrupted time series studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Both RCTs evaluated the effect of a mobile phone-based asthma self management intervention on asthma control by comparing it to traditional, paper-based asthma self management. One study allowed participants to keep daily entries of their asthma symptoms, asthma medication usage, peak flow readings and peak flow variability on their mobile phone, from which their level of asthma control was calculated remotely and displayed together with the corresponding asthma self management recommendations. In the other study, participants recorded the same readings twice daily, and they received immediate self management feedback in the form of a three-colour traffic light display on their phones. Participants falling into the amber zone of their action plan twice, or into the red zone once, received a phone call from an asthma nurse who enquired about the reasons for their uncontrolled asthma.

We did not conduct a meta-analysis of the data extracted due to the considerable degree of heterogeneity between these studies. Instead we adopted a narrative synthesis approach. Overall, the results were inconclusive and we judged the evidence to have a GRADE rating of low quality because further evidence is very likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate. In addition, there was not enough information in one of the included studies to assess the risk of bias for the majority of the domains. Although the other included study was methodologically rigorous, it was not possible to blind participants or personnel in the study. Moreover, there are concerns in both studies in relation to attrition bias and other sources of bias.

One study showed that the use of a smartphone app for the delivery of an asthma self management programme had no statistically significant effect on asthma symptom scores (mean difference (MD) 0.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.23 to 0.25), asthma-related quality of life (MD of mean scores 0.02, 95% CI -0.35 to 0.39), unscheduled visits to the emergency department (OR 7.20, 95% CI 0.37 to 140.76) or frequency of hospital admissions (odds ratio (OR) 3.07, 95% CI 0.32 to 29.83). The other included study found that the use of a smartphone app resulted in higher asthma-related quality of life scores at six-month follow-up (MD 5.50, 95% CI 1.48 to 9.52 for the physical component score of the SF-12 questionnaire; MD 6.00, 95% CI 2.51 to 9.49 for the mental component score of the SF-12 questionnaire), improved lung function (PEFR) at four (MD 27.80, 95% CI 4.51 to 51.09), five (MD 31.40, 95% CI 8.51 to 54.29) and six months (MD 39.20, 95% CI 16.58 to 61.82), and reduced visits to the emergency department due to asthma-related complications (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.99). Both studies failed to find any statistical differences in terms of adherence to the intervention and occurrence of other asthma-related complications.

Authors' conclusions

The current evidence base is not sufficient to advise clinical practitioners, policy-makers and the general public with regards to the use of smartphone and tablet computer apps for the delivery of asthma self management programmes. In order to understand the efficacy of apps as standalone interventions, future research should attempt to minimise the differential clinical management of patients between control and intervention groups. Those studies evaluating apps as part of complex, multicomponent interventions, should attempt to tease out the relative contribution of each intervention component. Consideration of the theoretical constructs used to inform the development of the intervention would help to achieve this goal. Finally, researchers should also take into account: the role of ancillary components in moderating the observed effects, the seasonal nature of asthma and long-term adherence to self management practices.

Résumé scientifique

Les smartphones et les tablettes pour l’autogestion de l'asthme

Contexte

L'asthme est l'une des affections à long terme la plus fréquente dans le monde, ce qui exerce une pression considérable sur les patients, les communautés et les systèmes de santé. Les principales directives internationales de pratique clinique recommandent désormais l'inclusion des programmes d'autogestion dans la prise en charge habituelle des patients asthmatiques. Ces programmes ont été associés à de meilleurs résultats chez les patients asthmatiques. Cependant, la mise en œuvre de programmes d'autogestion dans la pratique clinique et leur utilisation par les patients, restent médiocres. De récents progrès en technologie portable, tels que les smartphones et les tablettes, pourraient permettre de développer une prestation d’autogestion qui est extrêmement personnalisable, peu onéreuse et facilement accessible.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité, le rapport coût-efficacité et la faisabilité de l'utilisation de smartphones et de tablettes pour faciliter l’autogestion chez les patients asthmatiques.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre du groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health Library, Compendex/Inspec/Referex, IEEEXplore, ACM Digital Library, CiteSeer x et des résumés CAB via Web of Knowledge. Nous avons également consulté les registres d'essais en cours et la littérature grise. Nous avons examiné les références bibliographiques de toutes les études primaires et des articles de revue pour obtenir des références supplémentaires. Nous avons recherché des études publiées à partir de 2000. La dernière recherche a été menée en juin 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés en parallèle (ECR) ayant comparé, chez les patients cliniquement diagnostiqués comme étant asthmatiques, les interventions d’autogestion via les smartphones par rapport aux méthodes traditionnelles (telles que le maintien de données liées à l’asthme sur support papier).

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons utilisé la méthode standard prévue par la Collaboration Cochrane. Nos principaux critères de jugement correspondaient aux scores des symptômes, à la fréquence des visites de soins de santé en raison de crises d'asthme ou de complications et à la qualité de vie liée à la santé.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus deux ECR totalisant 408 participants. Nous n'avons trouvé aucun ECR en groupes, ni aucune étude contrôlée avant et après ou interrompue, qui remplissait les critères d'inclusion pour cette revue systématique. Les deux ECR évaluaient l'effet d'une intervention de l'autogestion de l'asthme, basée sur la téléphonie mobile pour contrôler l'asthme, comparé à une méthode traditionnelle sur support papier. Une étude permettait aux participants de maintenir les données de leurs symptômes liés à l’asthme, l'utilisation de médicaments pour traiter l'asthme, le débit expiratoire de pointe et la variabilité du débit expiratoire sur leur téléphone portable qui calculait à distance leur niveau de contrôle de l'asthme et présentait les recommandations correspondantes pour autogérer l'asthme. Dans l'autre étude, les participants ont enregistré les mêmes données deux fois par jour et ils recevaient immédiatement sur leur téléphone mobile des suggestions pour une autogestion sous forme de feux de signalisation de trois couleurs. Les participants chutant à deux reprises dans la zone ambrée de leur plan d'action, ou chutant une fois dans la zone rouge, recevaient un appel téléphonique d’une infirmière spécialisée dans le traitement de l'asthme pour connaitre les raisons de l'asthme non-contrôlé.

Nous n'avons pas effectué de méta-analyse des données extraites en raison du niveau d'hétérogénéité considérable entre ces études. À la place, nous avons adopté une approche de synthèse narrative. Dans l’ensemble, les résultats n'étaient pas concluants et nous avons jugé que les preuves avaient une évaluation GRADE de faible qualité, car d'autres preuves sont très susceptibles d'avoir un impact important sur notre confiance dans l'estimation de l'effet et sont susceptibles de modifier cette estimation. De plus, il n'y avait pas suffisamment d'informations dans l'une des études incluses afin d’évaluer le risque de biais pour la plupart des domaines. Malgré que l'autre étude incluse soit méthodologiquement rigoureuse, il n'a pas été possible de l’effectuer en aveugle au niveau des participants ou du personnel. En outre, des préoccupations par rapport à un biais d'attrition et d’autres sources de biais sont présentes dans les deux études.

Une étude a montré que l'utilisation d'un smartphone pour une autogestion de l'asthme n'avait aucun effet statistiquement significatif sur les scores de symptômes de l'asthme (différence moyenne (DM) 0,01, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% - de 0,23 à 0,25), sur la qualité de vie liée à l'asthme (DM des scores moyens de 0,02, IC à 95% - de 0,35 à 0,39), sur les visites non-planifiées aux urgences (RC 7,20; IC à 95% de 0,37 à 140,76) ou sur la fréquence des admissions à l'hôpital (rapport des cotes (RC) de 3,07, IC à 95% de 0,32 à 29,83). L'autre étude incluse a découvert que l'utilisation d'un smartphone entraînait une augmentation des scores de qualité de vie liée à l'asthme lors du suivi à six mois (DM 5.50, IC à 95% 1,48 à 9,52 pour le score de composante physique du questionnaire SF-12; DM de 6,00, IC à 95% de 2,51 à 9,49 pour le score de composante mentale du questionnaire SF-12), une amélioration de la fonction pulmonaire au bout de quatre mois (DM 27.80, IC à 95% de 4,51 à 51,09), cinq mois (DM 31,40, IC à 95% de 8,51 à 54,29) et six mois (DM 39,20, IC à 95% de 16,58 à 61,82), ainsi qu’une baisse des visites aux urgences pour cause de complications liées à l'asthme (RC 0,20, IC à 95% de 0,04 à 0,99). Les deux études n'ont pas réussi à démontrer de différences statistiques en termes d'adhésion à l'intervention et autres complications liées à l'asthme.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves actuelles ne sont pas suffisantes pour démontrer aux cliniciens, aux décideurs et aux concitoyens l’efficacité des smartphones et des tablettes pour la mise en œuvre de programmes d'autogestion de l'asthme. Afin de comprendre l'efficacité des applications en tant qu’interventions autonomes, les recherches futures devraient essayer de minimiser la différence de prise en charge clinique chez les patients entre les groupes témoins et les groupes d'intervention. Ces études évaluant les applications dans le cadre d’interventions complexes et multiples, devraient essayer de déterminer la contribution relative de chaque intervention. Des concepts théoriques utilisés pour orienter le développement de l'intervention pourrait aider à atteindre cet objectif. Enfin, les chercheurs devront également prendre en compte : le rôle des éléments auxiliaires pour modérer les effets observés, la nature saisonnière de l'asthme et l'observance à long terme des pratiques de l’autogestion.

Plain language summary

Can smartphone apps improve access to asthma self management?

Background

Self management programmes have been advocated as a means to help people with asthma achieve better levels of asthma control and better asthma-related outcomes. However, there are a number of barriers affecting the successful implementation and uptake of these programmes. These barriers call for innovative approaches for the delivery of self management programmes. Of particular interest is the use of consumer devices such as smartphones and tablet computers as a means of delivering these programmes within the existing healthcare configuration.

Review question

This review assessed whether smartphone and tablet computer apps are effective tools for supporting patients with asthma to self manage their own condition.

Description of the studies

We included two studies with a total of 408 participants. Both studies evaluated the effect of a mobile phone-based asthma self management intervention on asthma control by comparing it to traditional, paper-based asthma self management. One study allowed participants to keep daily entries of their asthma symptoms, asthma medication usage, peak flow readings and peak flow variability on their mobile phone, from which their level of asthma control was calculated remotely and displayed together with the corresponding asthma self management recommendations. In the other study, participants recorded the same readings twice daily, and they received immediate self management feedback in the form of a three-colour traffic light display on their phones. Participants falling into the amber zone of their action plan twice, or into the red zone once, received a phone call from an asthma nurse who enquired about the reasons for their uncontrolled asthma.

Key results

Due to the lack of enough included studies and the considerable differences between them, we were unable to obtain conclusive answers to our research question. One study showed that the use of a smartphone app can result in better asthma-related quality of life and lung function, and reduced visits to the emergency department. The other study failed to show any significant improvements in asthma-related outcomes after using a smartphone app as a delivery mechanism.

Quality of the evidence

The current evidence base is not sufficient to advise clinicians, policy-makers and the general public with regards to the effectiveness of smartphone and tablet computer apps for the delivery of asthma self management programmes.

This plain language summary is current as of June 2013.

Résumé simplifié

Les smartphones peuvent-ils améliorer l'accès à l'autogestion de l'asthme?

Contexte

Les programmes d'autogestion ont été préconisés comme moyen pour aider les personnes asthmatiques à acquérir un meilleur contrôle de l'asthme et de meilleurs résultats en termes d'asthme. Cependant, il existe un certain nombre d'obstacles pour mener à bien la mise en œuvre et l’utilisation de ces programmes. Ces obstacles requièrent des approches innovantes pour la mise en œuvre de programmes d'autogestion. Un intérêt particulier est l'utilisation d’appareils grand public tels que les smartphones et les tablettes comme un moyen d’administrer ces programmes selon la configuration existante des soins de santé.

Question de la revue

Cette revue a évalué si les smartphones et les tablettes sont des outils efficaces pour soutenir les patients asthmatiques à gérer leur propre maladie.

Description des études

Nous avons inclus deux études totalisant 408 participants. Les deux études évaluaient l'effet de l'autogestion de l'asthme par téléphonie mobile en le comparant à l'autogestion traditionnelle sur support papier. Une étude permettait aux participants de maintenir les données de leurs symptômes liés à l’asthme, l'utilisation de médicaments pour traiter l'asthme, le débit expiratoire de pointe et la variabilité du débit expiratoire sur leur téléphone portable qui calculait à distance leur niveau de contrôle de l'asthme et présentait les recommandations correspondantes pour autogérer l'asthme. Dans l'autre étude, les participants ont enregistré les mêmes données deux fois par jour et ils recevaient immédiatement sur leur téléphone mobile des suggestions pour une autogestion sous forme de feux de signalisation de trois couleurs. Les participants chutant à deux reprises dans la zone ambrée de leur plan d'action, ou chutant une fois dans la zone rouge, recevaient un appel téléphonique d’une infirmière spécialisée dans le traitement de l'asthme pour connaitre les raisons de l'asthme non-contrôlé.

Résultats principaux

En raison de l’insuffisance d'études incluses et des différences considérables entre elles, nous ne sommes pas parvenus à obtenir de réponses concluantes à notre question de recherche. Une étude a montré que l'utilisation d'un smartphone peut entraîner de meilleurs résultats liés à l'asthme au niveau de la qualité de vie et de la fonction pulmonaire, il permet également de réduire le nombre de visites aux urgences. L'autre étude n'a pas réussi à démontrer d’améliorations significatives dans les critères de jugement liés à l'asthme et suite à l’utilisation d'un smartphone comme un mécanisme de promulgation.

Qualité des preuves

Les preuves actuelles ne sont pas suffisantes pour démontrer aux cliniciens, aux décideurs et aux concitoyens, l’efficacité des smartphones et des tablettes pour la mise en œuvre de programmes d'autogestion de l'asthme.

Ce résumé simplifié est à jour en janvier 2013.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé

Ancillary